Author – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 19:17:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Author – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 Famous Author Jane Yolen Comes to Savoy for ‘Holiday Story Time’ | Entertainment https://fcacleveland.org/famous-author-jane-yolen-comes-to-savoy-for-holiday-story-time-entertainment/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 19:17:06 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/famous-author-jane-yolen-comes-to-savoy-for-holiday-story-time-entertainment/ WEST – Beloved bestselling author Jane Yolen, once called “the Hans Christian Anderson of American children’s literature” by Newsweek magazine, will be at the Savoy Bookshop and Café next Tuesday to read a few stories and sign a few books. “Yolen is one of the great storytellers of our time,” said Anastasia Soroko, the bookstore’s […]]]>

WEST – Beloved bestselling author Jane Yolen, once called “the Hans Christian Anderson of American children’s literature” by Newsweek magazine, will be at the Savoy Bookshop and Café next Tuesday to read a few stories and sign a few books.

“Yolen is one of the great storytellers of our time,” said Anastasia Soroko, the bookstore’s events and marketing manager, “and she’s an enigmatic presence as well.”

Yolen’s stories use “rhythm and rhyme in conjunction with elements of folklore and fantasy,” according to the Poetry Foundation, which quotes an article Yolen wrote for the Huffington Post, where she said: “I write to satisfy the story, poem or piece of a fascinating research that speaks to me. To rub a wound, to resonate with joy, to answer a question that no one else has answered satisfactorily to me.

Yolen is the author of over 400 books – including science fiction, fantasy and poetry in addition to children’s books – and his work has been translated into nearly two dozen languages. Her collection of poems, “Radiation Sonnets: Love, in Sickness and in Health,” deals with her late husband’s battle with cancer. His many books for young readers include the “Owl Moon” picture books, which was illustrated by John Schoenherr, “How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight?”, Illustrated by Mark Teague (which has over 15 million copies printed ), and the short story “The Devil’s Arithmetic.”

His non-fiction work includes “Take Joy: A Writer‘s Guide to Loving the Craft” and “Touch Magic: Fantasy, Faerie & Folklore in the Literature of Childhood”.

Born in New York, Yolen – who divides her time between homes in Hatfield, Mass., And Scotland – grew up in Hollywood, New York and Newport News, Virginia, and graduated from Smith College and University from Massachusetts. -Amherst. She won a Caldecott Medal, two Nebula Awards for Sci-Fi and Fantasy Writers of America, two Christopher Medals, and the Golden Kite Award from the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

She holds honorary doctorates from Smith College, Keene State College, and the College of Our Lady of the Elms (to name a few). Former president of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, Yolen served on the board of directors of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators for more than 25 years.

One of his books, “Arc of Bone,” his version of “Moby-Dick,” is a historical novel that revives the history of whaling in Nantucket.

Yolen’s fan base is diverse and multigenerational. Many of his books were written for – or with, in some cases – his grandchildren, who are now adults.

“It will be an amazing way for families to kick off the holiday season at the bookstore,” Soroko added, noting that Yolen will be reading excerpts from “How Dinosaurs Say Merry Christmas” and “How Dinosaurs Say Happy Hanukkah” and sign copies. for the fans.


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Outlander author Diana Gabaldon wanted Liam Neeson or Sir Sean Connery to play Jamie Fraser https://fcacleveland.org/outlander-author-diana-gabaldon-wanted-liam-neeson-or-sir-sean-connery-to-play-jamie-fraser/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 04:30:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/outlander-author-diana-gabaldon-wanted-liam-neeson-or-sir-sean-connery-to-play-jamie-fraser/ Hunky Sam Heughan wasn’t Outlander writer Diana Gabaldon’s first choice to play Jamie Fraser – she had Liam Neeson or Sir Sean Connery close to heart. The writer, whose books spawned one of the most popular TV shows on the planet, said that in picturing Jamie on screen it was about the rugged Irish actor […]]]>

Hunky Sam Heughan wasn’t Outlander writer Diana Gabaldon’s first choice to play Jamie Fraser – she had Liam Neeson or Sir Sean Connery close to heart.

The writer, whose books spawned one of the most popular TV shows on the planet, said that in picturing Jamie on screen it was about the rugged Irish actor or the star 007 that she saw in the role.

But, speaking at the launch of the ninth book in the Outlander series, Diana, 69, admitted that Sam’s cloak and sword turned out to be the perfect choice and that she wouldn’t change it for the world. .

The writer, who has confirmed that the sixth series of the hit drama starring Heughan, 41, as Jamie and Catriona Balfe as her time-traveling lover Claire, will air on March 6 2022, said: “Liam Neeson and Sir Sean Connery were the first contenders. for Jamie.

“It was years ago when my first books were selected for a feature film. People kept asking me who I would choose and these are the first two that come to mind.

“I was just thinking in general terms of tall, Celtic-looking men who could be successful and Liam and Sean were built that way and looked great in a kilt.

“The feature didn’t happen and when the Starz series started Neeson and Connery were too old and I left it up to the casting directors to find the perfect Jamie and I wasn’t disappointed.”



Catriona Balfe and Sam Heughan as Claire and Jamie Fraser

Diana, whose long-awaited book Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone is out now, exactly 30 years after the publication of her first Outlander book in 1991, added: “I couldn’t be happier with Catriona and Sam as heroes. and heroine. They are just wonderful.

“Sam is just everything. He’s a lovely guy who has become a good friend. We have a connection because he brought the character to life and I provided him with a job.

“Jamie and Claire have become more than a family, they are part of me. They have been my constant companions since I wrote my first book about them 30 years ago. Finding the perfect actors to play them and my other characters is no easy feat, but the show managed to do it and I couldn’t be happier. It’s fascinating to watch the story come to life on screen.



Diana Gabaldon with her husband Doug Watkins
Diana Gabaldon with her husband Doug Watkins

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Celebrating the release of her new 900-page blockbuster – which took seven years to write – Diana also revealed that Jamie and Claire’s epic love story is partly based on her relationship with her 45-year-old husband, Doug Watkins.

The mother of three, who lives in Scottsdale, Arizona, and had never set foot in Scotland before writing her first novel, said: “Doug is the love of my life and there are pieces of him in Jamie. We have been together for 50 years and married for 45 years. We have an everlasting relationship like Jamie and Claire.

“Ours spans decades, when he was centuries with them. My husband is proud that I feel this for him.

“I am often asked if I could travel through the stones in what period I would like to be and my answer is always the same – I am happy to be here with Doug and I would never want to be apart from him. We are planning to come to Scotland for our anniversary and take a look at the Culloden House Hotel near Inverness which is our favorite place to stay. ”



Diana Gabaldon
Diana Gabaldon

Diana is a consultant on the hit TV series, which before the pandemic was credited with boosting Scottish tourism by 72%, as fans flocked to Scotland to visit filming locations.

She said: “In 2019 Visit Scotland presented me with an award in recognition of my service to the industry.

“Scotland is one of the most beautiful countries on the planet and is a character in my books as Jamie and Claire. I feel honored to have helped boost tourism. It is a great legacy to leave the country I love.

Diana, who came up with the idea for her books after watching an episode of Doctor Who featuring a Scotsman in a kilt, said: “I’m a huge fan of The Doctor and was inspired… after watching an episode where Patrick Troughton played the time traveler.

“There was a minor character, a young Scotsman from 1745, who appeared in his kilt and I thought, ‘Perfect, a kilted hero in 18th century Scotland and the Stranger was born. “

“I’m still a fan of the show and can’t wait to catch up on the last two sets now that the book is finished. I don’t watch television when I write because there are already a lot of marbles of ideas rolling in my head.

Since the publication of Outlander’s first book, more than 50 million copies of Gabaldon’s novels have been sold worldwide.



Diana Gabaldon's Ninth Outlander <a class=Book – Go Tell The Bees I’m Gone” content=”https://i2-prod.dailyrecord.co.uk/incoming/article25528904.ece/ALTERNATES/s615b/0_JS251419531.jpg”/>
Diana Gabaldon’s Ninth Outlander Book – Go Tell The Bees I’m Gone

In Go Tell the Bees I Am Gone, it’s 1779 and Claire and Jamie are finally reunited with their daughter Brianna, her husband Roger and their children in Fraser’s Ridge. But what horrors occurred in the future to bring about their return?

Having the family together is a dream come true, but the Revolutionary War is drawing ever closer and there has been a hint from the future that Jamie is dying on the battlefield. Will it happen?

Even though Diana has said in the past that this is the penultimate book, fans will be delighted to know the 10th in the series, it might not be the last we hear from Jamie. and Claire.

The software expert, who has three science degrees, including a doctorate, said: “It took me seven years to write this, which is slightly misleading because during that time I wrote four more books and three scripts for TV – it wasn’t like I was sitting twiddling my thumbs.

“The next book is supposed to be the last because that’s where the story and the lives of my characters seem to go, and I’m not going to live forever. I am 70 years old in January.

“I think it’s the last one, but there might be another. There’s nothing to say, I won’t see anything in Jamie and Claire’s life that I can write about. I also have a contract for a prequel on Jamie Fraser’s parents.

She added: “One of the biggest mysteries that has confused Outlander fans is how Jamie, who can’t time travel, is seen watching Claire in the 1940s. I can tell you. promise that everything will be revealed in volume 10.



The cast of season 6 of Outlander
The cast of season 6 of Outlander

Diana, who made an appearance in the first series of Outlander as the wife of a wealthy merchant, Iona MacTavish, has agreed to make another appearance in the final series.

The author, who is a fan of Scottish writers Irvine Welsh, Ian Rankin and Andrew Greig, said: “I have been on the set of the series three times – mainly as a consultant – but made an appearance in the first series and I was asked to do another one in the finale but who knows when that will be.

“The sixth series will air in March of next year and a seventh has been confirmed. I hope all of my books come to life on screen. The appetite for Outlander is definitely here.

● Go Tell The Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon is now available.


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It’s time to talk about menopause: author reveals truths – and dispels myths https://fcacleveland.org/its-time-to-talk-about-menopause-author-reveals-truths-and-dispels-myths/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 00:07:45 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/its-time-to-talk-about-menopause-author-reveals-truths-and-dispels-myths/ It’s time to talk about menopause: Author reveals truths – and dispels myths – about most poorly understood diseases Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. to cancel An icon depicting a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret A block arrow icon pointing right. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook A Facebook […]]]>





It’s time to talk about menopause: Author reveals truths – and dispels myths – about most poorly understood diseases
































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JJ Hebert becomes USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestselling author with new business book, Success Mindsets https://fcacleveland.org/jj-hebert-becomes-usa-today-and-wall-street-journal-bestselling-author-with-new-business-book-success-mindsets/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 07:32:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/jj-hebert-becomes-usa-today-and-wall-street-journal-bestselling-author-with-new-business-book-success-mindsets/ Spirits of success PORTSMOUTH, NH, UNITED STATES, November 19, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Spirits of Success: How the Best Entrepreneurs Succeed in Business and in Life launched on November 9, 2021 and quickly became the no. 1 non-fiction book on Amazon. On November 18, the ebook hit the USA Today bestseller list at no. 126 and […]]]>

Spirits of success

PORTSMOUTH, NH, UNITED STATES, November 19, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Spirits of Success: How the Best Entrepreneurs Succeed in Business and in Life launched on November 9, 2021 and quickly became the no. 1 non-fiction book on Amazon. On November 18, the ebook hit the USA Today bestseller list at no. 126 and the Wall Street Journal bestseller list at no. 5 for non-fiction eBooks.

The book was co-authored by JJ Hebert and other great entrepreneurs. Hebert’s contribution, a chapter titled Putting Ideas in Motion: How a Low Point in Life Led to a Successful Mindset, is the opening chapter of the book.

The print edition of Success Mindsets will be available soon and will be distributed by Simon & Schuster.

From the back cover:

For motivated people looking for a more positive attitude, Success Mindsets is an anthology highlighting the thought process, attitude and approach to your professional life. The difference between success and failure is how you see a problem.

The world rewards success. It rarely shows the effort people put in to achieve it. We crave success, but it can seem so unattainable that we assume it’s not for us. What if successful business people told us their secrets? That what separates the adored from the forgotten is the state of mind.

You will understand this by reading the brilliant contributors to Success Mindsets. This anthology brings together the advice of dozens of outstanding leaders, from CEOs and champions to game changers. Success Mindsets reveals that there are many paths to success and you need to choose the one that best fits your concept.

Each chapter of Success Mindsets will reveal methods for developing the right approach to navigate to success.

About JJ Hébert:

JJ Hébert is a renowned entrepreneur and bestselling author. He is also the founder and CEO of MindStir Media, a leading self-publishing company. He was named “Entrepreneur to Watch in 2021” by International Business Times. Influencive selected him as one of the top entrepreneurs to follow in 2021 alongside Barbara Corcoran and Jordan Belfort, and LA Weekly crowned him as one of the top Instagram influencers you should follow. He has appeared in other major publications such as Forbes, Entrepreneur, Inc, Business Insider, and Yahoo Finance, among others. He is an editor for Entrepreneur Magazine and a member of the Forbes Business Council.

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Fashion designer Erdem and author Cressida Cowell to receive MBEs in Windsor https://fcacleveland.org/fashion-designer-erdem-and-author-cressida-cowell-to-receive-mbes-in-windsor/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 02:45:34 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/fashion-designer-erdem-and-author-cressida-cowell-to-receive-mbes-in-windsor/ Author Cressida Cowell to receive MBE in ceremony at Windsor Castle (Yui Mok / PA) (PA Wire) British fashion designer Erdem Moralioglu and How to Train Your Dragon author Cressida cowell will receive royal honors at windsor castle Wednesday. They will be honored with a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) at […]]]>

Author Cressida Cowell to receive MBE in ceremony at Windsor Castle (Yui Mok / PA) (PA Wire)

British fashion designer Erdem Moralioglu and How to Train Your Dragon author Cressida cowell will receive royal honors at windsor castle Wednesday.

They will be honored with a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) at the ceremony hosted by the Princess Royal, as well as sports stars and music legends who are also set to receive awards.

Born in Canada and based in London, designer M. Moralioglu counts the Duchess of Cambridge, former United States First Lady Michelle Obama, style dean Alexa Chung and actress Keira Knightley among his clients.

After a 15-year career in women’s fashion, creating stunning satin dresses and signature floral prints, the designer will receive an honor for Services to Fashion as he heads into men’s fashion.

Erdem Catwalk & # x002013;  London Fashion Week February 2020

Erdem Catwalk – London Fashion Week February 2020

Designer Erdem Moralioglu will receive a MBE To Windsor Castle on Wednesdays (Isabel Infantes / PA).

The writer and illustrator of How To Train Your Dragon, which has sold 11 million copies and has become a DreamWorks film series, said she was “thrilled and proud” to be recognized for her services to children’s literature.

After being named the recipient of the 2020 Queen’s Birthday Honors List, Ms Cowell, 55, said on Twitter: ‘So thrilled and proud to have received an MBE yesterday, just wanted to thank all of the kind people who sent you their best wishes and congratulations. “

Sports stars including golfer Pamela Chugg and former British, Commonwealth and European welterweight boxing champion Colin Jones will also receive honors for services to women’s sport and services to boxing in the Country of. Wales respectively.

After performing at Windsor Castle for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s wedding in 2018, cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason will return to the Royal Residence to collect an MBE for Services to Music.

London-born soul artist Mica Paris, who began singing in a local church gospel choir, will receive the same award.

Read more

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What the Newspaper Say – November 17

Health officials warn ‘tougher restrictions’ may be needed in NI


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From archaeologist to nurse to author, how Agatha Christie turned into a thriller novelist https://fcacleveland.org/from-archaeologist-to-nurse-to-author-how-agatha-christie-turned-into-a-thriller-novelist/ https://fcacleveland.org/from-archaeologist-to-nurse-to-author-how-agatha-christie-turned-into-a-thriller-novelist/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 02:30:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/from-archaeologist-to-nurse-to-author-how-agatha-christie-turned-into-a-thriller-novelist/ Queen of detective fiction, Agatha Christie has reigned over the cosmos of detective fiction since the 1920s. Even to this day, she is inextricably associated and synonymous with crime. The all-time bestselling mystery writer Christie was an accidental writer, not one who grew up wanting to be. Born in Torquay to upper-middle-class parents, she moved […]]]>
Queen of detective fiction, Agatha Christie has reigned over the cosmos of detective fiction since the 1920s. Even to this day, she is inextricably associated and synonymous with crime. The all-time bestselling mystery writer Christie was an accidental writer, not one who grew up wanting to be.

Born in Torquay to upper-middle-class parents, she moved to Paris at the age of 16 to study voice and piano; she was an archaeologist by profession later in life. Author of 66 mysterious murders, Christie freely admitted to knowing nothing about ballistics. Most of his books feature characters who die from poisoning, as more than 30 characters in his books have been poisoned to death. The connection to crime and poisons dates back to her training as a nurse during World War I, when she trained and worked under the direction of a pharmacist. Prescriptions at the time were handwritten and she had to write the prescriptions herself at the dispensary of the hospital where she was stationed. She acquired a good knowledge of the use of poisons and their dosage. It is interesting to note that the pharmacist, under whom she worked, had in her pocket at all times a dose of curare, a chemical that causes death by paralysis and asphyxiation. When asked why he was carrying such a deadly item with him, the pharmacist proved his resemblance to one of Christie’s characters when he mentioned the feeling of satisfaction that comes with carrying such a dangerous substance ” It makes me feel powerful, ”he told the author. It turned out later that he was administering a batch of suppositories with 10 times more medicine than needed. Christie noticed this and stopped the doses from being given to the patients by deliberately dropping the lot on the floor and apologizing later. The next batch was properly prepared and avoided such dramatic acts.

Pharmacology professor Michael Gerald studied Christie and published a book in 1993 called “The Poisonous Pen of Agatha Christie” which lists his favorite poisons and their uses. It is not a difficult task to notice how the narrative of his novels focuses primarily on poisons and associated chemistry, including availability, symptoms, methods of detection and antidotes, instead of psychological makeup or of the murderer, rendering the plot into an elaborate puzzle that has no particular formula for solving and leaves the reader guessing until the end, reaffirming the author’s and reader’s faith in the effectiveness of the “Whodunit” formula.

Credibility and praise are found in Christie’s work because of the extremely reliable sources she refers to for her writings. In Christie’s day, chemicals were used to commit suicides and murders by people eating phosphorus-laden matchsticks to kill themselves or administering arsenic to anyone they wanted to avoid. So Christie’s plots involve deaths by administering poisons, both rare and common, through food and drink instead of any other obscure path that is difficult to fit into her plots. The aforementioned supervising pharmacist who was originally Christie’s primary connection to poisons and criminal psychology is also featured in Christie’s 1961 novel “Pale Horse” and this becomes the defining example of how her actual engagement with poisons and chemistry paved the way for his writing. journey that immortalized her.

(By: Bhavya Sharma)

READ MORE: Popular Korean Proverbs You Should Know

5 novels by Agatha Christie with unusual narrators that will give you chills


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Author says he needs hope and religion in difficult times https://fcacleveland.org/author-says-he-needs-hope-and-religion-in-difficult-times/ https://fcacleveland.org/author-says-he-needs-hope-and-religion-in-difficult-times/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 13:32:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/author-says-he-needs-hope-and-religion-in-difficult-times/ New Book “Life Must Be Celebrated” Contains 52 Messages of Hope and Affirmation KANSAS CITY, Missouri, November 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Do you wonder how it is possible for life to assert itself, for religion to be relevant, and for our daily human journey to be hopeful in an era marked by division, […]]]>

New Book “Life Must Be Celebrated” Contains 52 Messages of Hope and Affirmation

KANSAS CITY, Missouri, November 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Do you wonder how it is possible for life to assert itself, for religion to be relevant, and for our daily human journey to be hopeful in an era marked by division, cynicism and negativity? If that is the case, Robert lee hill has fifty-two messages for you.

In Life Must Be Celebrated: Selected Sermons – Messages for the 21stst Century (Caroline Street Press, 272 pages, October 2021), the author, poet and pastor answers this fundamental question with fifty-two messages born from his experience as a pastor and community leader.

In these pages, clergy, laity, and spiritual seekers will find positive guidance and inspiration for living a life marked by kindness, joy, love, and celebration.

“If there was a Hall of Fame for preachers, Robert lee hill would definitely be included. These fifty-two sermons present the best of contemporary preaching in terms of spirit, theological acuity, expediency, concern for justice, human insight, homiletical variety, evocative language and poetry ” , said Ronald J. Allen, professor of preaching, gospels and letters, Emeritus Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, in the foreword.

Hill was minister of Community Christian Church in Kansas City, Missouri, from 1985 until his semi-retirement in 2015. He is a writer, poet and community consultant for organizations focused on social justice issues, including excellence in education, voter registration and care quality health. He has written or edited ten books, including the famous Life is too short for anything other than love (Woodneath Press 214 pages, March 2021) and All you need is more love (Caroline Street Press 239 pages, May 2020).

For more information visit https://revhill.wordpress.com/about/. Paperbacks and eBooks are also available online at Amazon.com. To schedule a reading or signature, or to order personalized copies, contact AGPR at https://www.alexgpr.com/contact/.

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Alex greenwood
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Join the author for the online library session https://fcacleveland.org/join-the-author-for-the-online-library-session/ https://fcacleveland.org/join-the-author-for-the-online-library-session/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 09:10:06 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/join-the-author-for-the-online-library-session/ Content of the article At Catherine Fogarty’s Murder Inside: The True Story of the Killing Riot at Kingston Penitentiary is a compelling story of an uprising that took place in April 1971. In order to draw attention to the the dehumanizing realities of life inside the penitentiary – including overcrowding, harsh punishments and extreme isolation […]]]>

Content of the article

At Catherine Fogarty’s Murder Inside: The True Story of the Killing Riot at Kingston Penitentiary is a compelling story of an uprising that took place in April 1971. In order to draw attention to the the dehumanizing realities of life inside the penitentiary – including overcrowding, harsh punishments and extreme isolation – incarcerated people took the guards hostage and tried to negotiate before things took a tragic turn .

Content of the article

Catherine Fogarty will join us online on November 23 at 7 p.m. Register to join us at peclibrary.org or call (613) 476-5962. If you need help or technology to reach out, call and we’ll help you.

Catherine Fogarty is a storyteller. She is the founder and president of Big Coat Media and Story Hunter Podcasts. An accomplished television producer, screenwriter and director, Catherine has produced award-winning lifestyle, reality TV and documentary series for Canadian and US networks for over twenty years.

Catherine is the executive producer of the Gemini-nominated series Love It or List It, one of Canada’s most popular lifestyle / reality formats, now in its tenth season on HGTV. Catherine is the author, producer and voice of Story Hunter Podcasts, a true network of criminal podcasts that focuses on historical Canadian criminal stories.

First trained as a social worker, Catherine studied deviance and criminology. She has worked with many populations at risk, including street youth, people with AIDS, women victims of violence and social services. Catherine holds an MA in Social Work (University of Sydney), an MBA in Human Resources Management (University of New England) and an MFA in Non-Fictional Creation from the University of Kings College. . She recently received the Marina Nemet Award in Creative Writing from the Continuing Education Division of the University of Toronto.

Catherine will join the conversation with Lenny Epstein. He is one of the filmmakers behind “Until the cows come home.”

Content of the article

For two days in the late summer of 2010, hundreds of angry protesters stood outside the Frontenac Prison farm in the heart of Kingston, Ont., Ready to block cattle trucks brought in to remove the dairy herd. centenary. The dramatic clash between protesters and police lasted two days, in pouring rain and scorching sun. It was headlines across the country. An army of black-clad police arrested twenty-four people. The youngest woman arrested was 14, the oldest 85. Till The Cows Come Home tells the story of this extraordinary display of civil disobedience, filled with captivating clashes and a cast of colorful characters, farmers angry at the passionate nuns passing by the endearing ex-inmates. . He asks provocative questions about the Canadian government’s alarming approach to criminal justice, food security… and democracy itself.

It promises to be an interesting discussion. If you are interested in reading Murder inside or watch the DVD recording of ‘ Until the cows come home, both are available at the library. You can ask at any branch of the library.

ONE-ON-ONE technical help:

Available in person, online and by phone. Call (613) 476-5962 to make your free appointment. Get answers to all your technical questions.


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Q&A: Kirsty Manning, author of “The French Gift” https://fcacleveland.org/qa-kirsty-manning-author-of-the-french-gift/ https://fcacleveland.org/qa-kirsty-manning-author-of-the-french-gift/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 17:00:52 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/qa-kirsty-manning-author-of-the-french-gift/ The French gift is a WWII story of female friendship, longing and sacrifice through war and loss, bringing together the present and the past. We chat with Kirsty Manning about her latest book release, as well as her writing, research, book recommendations and more! Hi, Kirsty! Can you tell our readers a bit about yourself? […]]]>

The French gift is a WWII story of female friendship, longing and sacrifice through war and loss, bringing together the present and the past.

We chat with Kirsty Manning about her latest book release, as well as her writing, research, book recommendations and more!

Hi, Kirsty! Can you tell our readers a bit about yourself?

I live between Melbourne and a sleepy seaside village where I am renovating an old cabin alongside my family. My weeks are pretty busy in the city running with three teenagers and trying to write during the day. My husband, I am the co-owner of the Bellota Wine Bar and the Prince Wine Store.

I love good food and good wine, even better if someone cooks for me! In my spare time I like long walks with friends and swimming in the ocean.

Before writing, I was a book editor and then a freelance journalist. (Also, a pretty awful waitress.) I have degrees in literature and a masters in communication.

As the year draws to a close, how has 2021 been for you?

Strange! I live in Melbourne, Victoria and we have been confined for 265 days. I know!

As a writer, I can isolate myself socially like a boss, but with my husband and three teenage children all working from home for most of that time, I had to do things a little differently.

I loved (for the most part) this moment of closeness with my family and the time for reflection. It has been a year of review with ups and downs.

That said, 2022 cannot come soon enough …

When did you first discover your love for writing?

Primary school. My mom recently sent me the first cover story I wrote. I’ve always loved creative writing in school, but I didn’t study it and didn’t get into fiction as a career until I was forty.

Quick flash tour! Tell us about the first book you remember reading, the one that made you want to be an author and that you can’t stop thinking about!

Oscar and Lucinda by Peter Carey. I read it in my senior year of high school and there is a scene of a glass structure floating on the river. I could smell the eucalyptus, the longing and the longing.

Your new novel, The French gift, is out now! If you could only describe it in five words, what would they be?

Lush, surprising, full of hope

What can readers expect?

Right now, women are crying out for our voices to be heard. For too long history has been written and recorded by men. War stories are generally told from the perspective of men. How many movies and books feature men: Gallipoli, Saving Private Ryan, Hello Vietnam etc

But here’s the thing: Women have always been strong. Women have always tied their arms and led their loved ones in better conditions, to safety, to the future.

In my heroine, Josephine, I wanted to capture some of that resilience and inspiration of women in times of war. To honor the women who have been forced to work in excruciating conditions, and whose stories have been largely forgotten.

Where does the inspiration for The French gift comes from?

I read a lot of non-fiction because I love to explore the forgotten pockets of history in my novels. A few years ago, a single paragraph from the excellent non-fiction book The Riviera set by Mary S. Lovell lit my imagination. Lovell described a decadent French Riviera party hosted by a famous hostess, where one of the guests is (fake) murdered and local police enlisted as part of the game.

What is funny, I was thinking! What if I wrote a book about a decadent murder party … and then it goes wrong.

But I also wanted to write a story inspired by the ordeal of WWII women who were forced to work in factories. We know so little about their history – women’s war stories – and I came across a translated version of a memoir by Agnes Humbert.

Can you tell us a bit about the challenges you encountered while writing and how you were able to overcome them?

It’s always a huge challenge to balance the nuances of a real person and real places with the needs of a fictional character to serve the story. I always work with historians and translators for authenticity. I have readers who check all sensitivity because I want to honor and celebrate the inspiration behind my novels.

See also

The other challenge in a double-timed book is to marry contemporary history with historical intrigue. It’s a bit like putting a puzzle together with no idea what shape it is supposed to have. Everything is linked at the end.

As a writer of historical fiction, can you tell us about your research approach? Especially for this novel?

I took copious notes throughout Resistance– (expertly translated into English by Barbara Mellor) to get into the mind of Agnès Humbert. To try to understand a woman who was part of the Resistance, a member of the subterfuge group Alain Fournier Circle, co-founder of the underground newspaper Resistance, was tried, convicted and imprisoned for espionage for five years in the prisons of Cherche-Midi, de la Santé, Fresnes and Anrath and underwent forced labor at the Phrix Rayon factory.

I like to read primary sources, but also government documents, prison records, court documents, etc. There is a list of some resources at the end of each book so people can follow the areas that interest them.

Unlike my heroine Joséphine, Agnès Humbert was a key figure in the liberation, and stayed in Germany to help American troops drive out the Nazis. Her story does not stop at the Phrix Rayon Factory, since at the age of 51 she returns to a liberated France, to work and to writing. She was also a devoted mother, daughter and wife.

Agnès Humbert was an extraordinary woman. My quest in historical fiction has long been to draw attention to forgotten pockets of history. Agnes Humbert’s English translator Barbara Mellor captured with precision and visceral reality a type of reporting on a female first-person experience of the Resistance and shed light on the forced labor factories used during WWII that have long been overlooked in history.

What’s the best and worst writing advice you’ve ever received?

Worse, you should work out your ideas with a lot of people before you put pen to paper. Ideas by committee never work

Best: Keep writing. You cannot change anything.

What’s the next step for you?

A historical mystery series, set in Paris.

Finally, what were your favorite reads of 2021?

at Sarah Bailey The room mate, Jane harper The survivors

Will you pick up The French gift? Tell us in the comments below!


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Best-selling author William Kent Krueger doesn’t claim to be a writer: “I’m a storyteller” | Culture & Leisure https://fcacleveland.org/best-selling-author-william-kent-krueger-doesnt-claim-to-be-a-writer-im-a-storyteller-culture-leisure/ https://fcacleveland.org/best-selling-author-william-kent-krueger-doesnt-claim-to-be-a-writer-im-a-storyteller-culture-leisure/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 09:32:52 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/best-selling-author-william-kent-krueger-doesnt-claim-to-be-a-writer-im-a-storyteller-culture-leisure/ ST. PAUL, Minn. – As a little boy, William Kent Krueger never went down for a nap, never went to bed at night, without hearing a story first. It has become his way of seeing the world – through stories. As far back as he can remember, “I always wanted to be a storyteller too.” […]]]>

ST. PAUL, Minn. – As a little boy, William Kent Krueger never went down for a nap, never went to bed at night, without hearing a story first. It has become his way of seeing the world – through stories. As far back as he can remember, “I always wanted to be a storyteller too.”

And a storyteller he has become. His 18th Cork O’Connor mystery, “Lightning Strike,” was released in August. Nine of his novels have made the New York Times bestseller list, it has been published in 21 languages, and it has won a whole shelf of accolades, from the Minnesota Book Awards to Edgars, Barrys and Anthonys, to the Oscars of the world. mysterious. There are over a million printed copies of his novel “Ordinary Grace”.

Doesn’t that make him a writer, not a storyteller?

Not exactly. For Krueger, there is a distinction.

“I mean, Colson Whitehead is a writer,” he said. “I am a storyteller.”

Krueger is in his St. Paul’s garden as he speaks. It’s a hot and windy day in mid-September, and he has jumped out of his lawn chair to grab and stabilize the heavy patio umbrella, which threatens to topple in the wind and crush his visitor. He is cheerful and unperturbed and continues his thought without interruption.

“I think a writer sets out to do something with literature that sort of has a bigger purpose in mind,” he said as he clung to the umbrella pole. “Perhaps a writer sets out to experiment with a new literary technique, to change the course of literature, or has a particular social problem that he wishes to explore. But a storyteller simply sets out to tell. a story.”

The stories Krueger tells, for the most part, are mysteries – his recurring character, Cork O’Connor, is a former anti-crime law enforcement official who hails from a town on the edge of the Wilderness. canoe trip from Boundary Waters Minnesota. But he also wrote two independent novels, “Ordinary Grace” and “This Tender Land,” which are coming-of-age tales set in the Minnesota River Valley in the 1960s.

Whatever he writes, he tries to make it as true as possible.

“You are always going to touch on things that are universal,” he said. “But that’s not what you set out to do. You just wrote a good true story.”

He pauses, laughs. “I think I had to do a really long apprenticeship before I felt like a natural storyteller,” he said.

From the cafe to the dining room

Krueger’s long apprenticeship began about 35 years ago, when he lived in another area of ​​St. Paul and had a full-time job – what he calls being a member of the “working world”.

Every morning he got up early and walked over to the St. Clair Broiler just as it opened at 6 am. He would order coffee (“Coffee is part of the ritual,” he said) and open his notebook. He wrote for exactly an hour and 15 minutes, then took the bus to work.

He was almost 50 when he landed his first book deal – a two book deal for Cork O’Connor’s first two mysteries, “Iron Lake” and “Boundary Waters”.

Some things have changed since then. Krueger, who turns 71 in November, now writes on a laptop, not a notebook. He and his wife, Diane, moved to a bungalow in Como Park next to his brother, and his writing desk moved to the local cafe. He sold more books, became more famous.

And then, of course, COVID-19 hit, and he did his best to ruin everything. But Krueger is the kind of guy who makes lemonade with lemons. Stopping the pandemic, he soon realized, gave him time, and he took full advantage of it.

Since the start of the lockdown he has written two Cork O’Connor novels, two short stories, and is now working on his third independent novel, a companion to the first two and set, once again, in the Minnesota River Valley .

So much unstructured time “makes me want to step away from all the other stuff and just write,” he said, but it’s unlikely to happen.

Highly in demand as a speaker, he has spent in-person events at Zoom and chatted with some 300 book clubs around the world. His “Lightning Strike” book tour of 35 in-person events has also gone almost entirely virtual. Wednesday’s Talking Volumes event will be his second public appearance since the start of the pandemic (he traveled to Texas in September for a community chat with 600 people).

He’s now writing at the dining room table, a switch he can’t wait to flip whenever it’s safe.

“The truth is, if you’re making a living as a writer, you’re doing what you need to do to get the writing done,” he said. “The transition was a lot easier than I imagined. One thing I love about coffee, getting up, dressing, grooming and going to the cafe was like going into creative mode. don’t have that transition now. I feel like I have to get down to business. “

Krueger, who grew up in Oregon, was in his thirties when he first set foot in the boundary waters. “I just fell madly in love with this place, I tried to spend as much time as possible in the North,” he said. “I have decided, this is what I want to write.”

Every good book is built around conflict, and northern Minnesota has given it a spadeful way.

“Conflict is so much a part of life in the north – it’s the rugged landscape, it’s the weather, it’s different cultures trying to live together, and then I thought, well, what if I created a character who reflected the conflict? ” Cork is part Irish, part Ojibway.

Krueger began writing at a time when the term “cultural appropriation” was not widely used. Yet he is keenly aware that without “a drop” of Ojibwa blood himself, he must exercise extreme caution when writing about the Ojibway culture and people.

“It wasn’t a problem at first. Tony Hillerman was doing it [in his mysteries featuring the Navajo Tribal Police] and doing it pretty well and was pretty much the inspiration for me. “

Still, he said: “Every time I sit down to write a Cork story, I am painfully aware that I am a white man encroaching on a culture that is not mine. And so I work really hard. to get it right. That said, it’s still written from a white perspective – Cork is 3⁄4 Irish and 1⁄4 Ojibwa. I’m doing everything I can to make the Ojibway part right. And the response I got was, without exception, positive. “

Human nature, he said, is human nature, no matter what culture you come from. And “if you are a storyteller, you go where the story takes you”.

“Lightning Strike” takes readers back to Cork’s childhood, when he solved his first mystery, came to appreciate his Ojibwe heritage, got into a fight with his father, and began to grow and think for himself.

“My agent has been urging me to do this for years,” he said. “A lot of times during the Cork O’Connor series, I referred to events from her past, to people from her past, and she told me that this was rich territory for mine.”

Continuity, however, was tricky. Krueger does not keep a notebook describing the history of Cork or the events mentioned in previous books (“That would be a good idea, wouldn’t it?” He said with a smile) and when he did returned the manuscript, his agent reported discrepancies. .

So he “worked really hard to make sure everything worked out”, although he admits he faked in a few places. “I’ve had a few readers who wrote and said, ‘You know, in this novel there are 10 novels, you said this, and here you said this. “And you can hope, hey, who remembers 10 novels ago, but they do.”

Over the years, Krueger said he grew to trust himself more and quit sweating because of writing. “The mystery is a construction, and so I sweat the plot. All of the narrative elements are what I really love – the character, the sense of place, the sense of atmosphere, finding a deep language to relate with. the story. These are the things that I love, but because they are mysteries, they have to have this plot first. “

And so he’s working on it, refining the story, digging deeper into the characters, turning the mystery as much as possible, trying to write a good true story.

Because that’s what a storyteller does.

© 2021 StarTribune. Visit to startribune.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Copyright 2021 Tribune Content Agency.


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