Author – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Author – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 Reed City author uses his mother’s letters to tell his story | News https://fcacleveland.org/reed-city-author-uses-his-mothers-letters-to-tell-his-story-news/ Tue, 17 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/reed-city-author-uses-his-mothers-letters-to-tell-his-story-news/ REED CITY – In his previous writings, author Timothy James Bazzett has captured the experiences of growing up in Reed City, joining the military, and falling in love. Now back with her sixth book, Bazzett tells her mother’s life story through her own letters, diary entries and unfinished memoirs. Of his many jobs over the […]]]>

REED CITY – In his previous writings, author Timothy James Bazzett has captured the experiences of growing up in Reed City, joining the military, and falling in love. Now back with her sixth book, Bazzett tells her mother’s life story through her own letters, diary entries and unfinished memoirs.

Of his many jobs over the years, Bazzett never expected the author to be one of them. After spending eight years in the U.S. Army, five years teaching English at Monroe County Community College, and 30 years serving in the Department of Defense, he found himself retired and back in his hometown.

Bazzett said he was just looking for something to do and became a surprise bestseller with his debut book, “Reed City Boy.” Four other books follow, entitled “Soldier Boy”, “Pinhead”, “Booklover” and “Love, War and Polio”.

With a background in teaching English, Bazzett has always been a reader, and while he had no plans to become a writer, he said it fell pretty easily into his life.

“It was just something I had to do, I guess,” he said.

The idea for his latest book was born when he discovered a series of letters his mother, Daisy, wrote to his father when she was a student at Central Michigan University. Bazzett said his mother was a prolific writer and if he were to count every letter she sent in her lifetime, the number would be in the thousands.

Initially, he forwarded the letters to the historic Clarke Library on the CMU campus, as they reflected college life in the 1930s.

But, when Bazzett realized how truly fascinating an experience was for his mother, he decided to compile the letters into a narrative format.

So was the creation of “Daisy: Pieces of a Life”.

Daisy, whose maiden name was Whalen, graduated from high school at age 15 and began attending CMU at age 16 between 1932 and 1936.

“Nothing that I thought too much about as a kid but think about now is that she went to college during the Great Depression, which was unusual,” Bazzett said. “And she was a woman who went to college.”

The purpose of “Daisy,” he said, is to try to express what women’s lives were like in the 1930s and what kinds of expectations followed. For Bazzett’s mother, a college education was unexpected, and without a scholarship, he said she probably wouldn’t have attended.

Throughout the first half of the book are Daisy’s compiled letters to Bazzett’s father. She tells him about her classes and her life on campus.

“You just realized how exciting it was for her,” Bazzett said.

One of the main sources of tension between the two was Daisy’s plans for post-graduation. Bazzett’s father wanted to get married as soon as possible, but his mother had a desire to teach. She ended up spending a year in what are now called Pine River Schools, but were then Remus Schools.

Then she got married and Bazzett said that became her role. He asked his mother why she was not working and said she replied that caring for her children was the most important job she could do.

Pieces of Bazzett’s family life were captured in many of his mother’s diary entries, which are also included in “Daisy”. The book also contains the beginning of what Daisy wanted to be a memoir of her life. Bazzett said she started the memoir when she was around 90, but over the years she couldn’t finish the job.

Daisy Bazzett died aged 96 in 2013, but Bazzett hopes her memory can live on in her book. Reed City was his hometown, but it was also his mother’s, despite her lack of familiarity with its people. As a wife and mother, Bazzett said Daisy didn’t have the same connectedness to the city that her father did.

When he retired and returned to Reed City in 2001, Bazzett said he would meet members of the community who remembered his father well but knew little about his mother. By reading “Daisy”, the people of Reed City can finally get to know her.

“I hope this will give people a chance to remember who my mother was,” he said.

During a May 17 visit to the Reed City Area District Library at 5 p.m., Bazzett will share some excerpts from “Daisy: Pieces of a Life,” followed by a Q and A. All of Bazzett’s books, including including “Daisy,” are available now on Amazon and on the Bazzett website and publisher Rathole Books.

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Legendary lawyer, LGBTQ+ activist and author Urvashi Vaid has died https://fcacleveland.org/legendary-lawyer-lgbtq-activist-and-author-urvashi-vaid-has-died/ Sat, 14 May 2022 22:13:08 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/legendary-lawyer-lgbtq-activist-and-author-urvashi-vaid-has-died/ LOS ANGELES – The publisher, editor and staff of the Los Angeles Blade congratulates our sports editor and contributing writer Dawn Ennis on being awarded the 33rd Annual GLAAD Media Award 2022 in the category of “Outstanding Online Journalism Article: “”No Time for Intolerance: ‘Dr. Rachel Levine Has a Job to Do,’ written for Forbes […]]]>

LOS ANGELES – The publisher, editor and staff of the Los Angeles Blade congratulates our sports editor and contributing writer Dawn Ennis on being awarded the 33rd Annual GLAAD Media Award 2022 in the category of “Outstanding Online Journalism Article: “”No Time for Intolerance: ‘Dr. Rachel Levine Has a Job to Do,’ written for Forbes Magazine Online.

Ennis, who works as a sportswriter for LA Blade, is an award-winning reporter for Forbes.com, The Daily Beast, Out Magazine, Senior Executive, CTVoice Magazine, Xtra Magazine and StarTrek.com.

She is also an on-air correspondent for “CTVoice Out Loud” on WTNH-TV and hosts the talk show “RiseUP With Dawn Ennis.” In 2013, she was the first trans journalist in the United States to appear on the network’s television news while working for ABC News.

Ennis, who lives in West Hartford, Connecticut, is a mother of three and an adjunct professor at the University of Hartford, where she teaches journalism, advertising, public relations, podcasting and media literacy for the School of Communication at UH College of Arts and Sciences. .

In addition to Ennis, the Los Angeles Blade congratulates all of the winners:

PRIZE BENEFICIARIES

At the New York ceremony, GLAAD announced the award winners for the following categories live on stage:

  • Laid received the award for Outstanding Drama Series [presented by Laverne Cox]
  • “HIV/AIDS: 40 Years Later” TODAY (NBC) received the award for Outstanding Television Journalism Segment [presented by Amber Tamblyn and Nyle DiMarco]
  • Power Rangers received the award for Outstanding programming for children and family [presented by Cynthia Nixon]
  • sesame street received the award for Outstanding Children’s Programming [presented by Cynthia Nixon]

Other winners announced in New York:

Outstanding Broadway Production: (TIE) Company and Thoughts of a colored man

Outstanding Music Artist: Lil Nas X

Outstanding Breakthrough Musical Artist: Lily Rose, Louder Than Me (Big Loud Records/Back Blocks Music/Republic Records)

Outstanding Variety or Talk Show Episode: “Elliot Page” The Oprah Conversation (AppleTV+)

Outstanding Television Journalism Segment: “HIV/AIDS: 40 years later” TODAY (NBC)

Outstanding TV Journalism – long version: “White House Pride” (MSNBC)

Outstanding Print Item: “Legislators Can’t Cite Local Examples of Trans Girls in Sport” by David Crary and Lindsay Whitehurst (The Associated Press)

Outstanding Online Journalism Article: “‘No Time for Intolerance:’ Dr. Rachel Levine Has a Job to Do” by Dawn Ennis (Forbes.com)

Outstanding Online Journalism – Video or Multimedia: “Transnational” [series] by Eva Reign, Alyza Enriquez, Freddy McConnell, Vivek Kemp, Courtney Brooks, Sarah Burke, Hendrik Hinzel, Alyza Enriquez, Dan Ming, Trey Strange and Daisy Wardell (VICE News)

Outstanding Blog: Pittsburgh Lesbian Pen pals

Outstanding article on online journalism in Spanish: (TIE) “Claudia: La Enfermera Trans que Lucha Contra el Covid en Ciudad Juárez” by Louisa Reynolds (Nexos.com) and “Somos Invisibles”: La Discriminación y los Riesgos se Multiplican para los Indígenas LGBTQ+” by Albinson Linares (Telemundo.com)

Outstanding Spanish-Language Online Journalism – Video or Multimedia: “Expulsados ​​México: Cómo la Comunidad Transgénero se Unió para Ayudar a los Migrantes” by Patricia Clarembaux, Anna Clare Spelman, and Celemente Sánchez (Univision Noticias)

Below is a complete list of all categories and winners from the 33rd Annual GLAAD Media Awards in New York and Los Angeles.

Best New TV Series: hacks (HBO Max)

Best Comedy Series: saved by the bell (Peacock)

Best Drama Series: LAID (FX)

Outstanding Film – Wide Distribution: Eternals (Walt Disney Studios Cinema)

Outstanding Reality Program: (TIE) RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1) and We are here (HBO)

Outstanding Documentary: Change the game (Hulu)

Best TV Movie: Single until the end (Netflix)

Outstanding Film – Limited Release: Parallel mothers (Sony Pictures Classics)

Limited or exceptional anthology series: It’s a sin (HBOMAX)

Outstanding Children’s Programming: “Family Day” sesame street (HBO Max)

Exceptional programming for children and family: Power Rangers: Dino Fury (Nickelodeon/Netflix)

Outstanding Music Artist: Lil Nas X, MONTERO (Columbia Records)

Outstanding Breakthrough Musical Artist: Lily Rose, Stronger than me (Big Loud Records/Back Blocks Music/Republic Records)

Outstanding Broadway Production: (TIE) THE SOCIETY and Thoughts of a colored man

Outstanding Video Game: Life is Strange: True Colors (Deck Nine Games/Square Enix)

Outstanding comic: Crush & Lobo (DC Comics)

Best Original Graphic Novel/Anthology: Comfort! Love and Pompoms (Oni Press)

Outstanding Overall Magazine Coverage: the lawyer

Outstanding Variety or Talk Show Episode: “Elliot Page” The Oprah Conversation (AppleTV+)

Outstanding Television Journalism Segment: “HIV/AIDS: 40 years later” TODAY (NBC)

Outstanding TV Journalism – long version: “White House Pride” (MSNBC)

Outstanding Print Item: “Legislators Can’t Cite Local Examples of Trans Girls in Sport” by David Crary and Lindsay Whitehurst (The Associated Press)

Outstanding Online Journalism Article: “‘No Time for Intolerance:’ Dr. Rachel Levine Has a Job to Do” by Dawn Ennis (Forbes.com)

Outstanding Online Journalism – Video or Multimedia: “Transnational” [series] by Eva Reign, Alyza Enriquez, Freddy McConnell, Vivek Kemp, Courtney Brooks, Sarah Burke, Hendrik Hinzel, Alyza Enriquez, Dan Ming, Trey Strange and Daisy Wardell (VICE News)

Outstanding Blog: Pittsburgh Lesbian Pen pals

Best Scripted Television Series in Spanish: Maricon Lost (HBO Max)

Outstanding Spanish-Language Television Journalism: “Orgullo LGBTQ: 52 Años de Lucha y Evolución” (Telemundo 47)

Outstanding article on online journalism in Spanish: (TIE) “Claudia: La Enfermera Trans que Lucha Contra el Covid en Ciudad Juárez” by Louisa Reynolds (Nexos.com) and “Somos Invisibles”: La Discriminación y los Riesgos se Multiplican para los Indígenas LGBTQ+” by Albinson Linares (Telemundo.com)
Outstanding Spanish-Language Online Journalism – Video or Multimedia: “Expulsados ​​México: Cómo la Comunidad Transgénero se Unió para Ayudar a los Migrantes” by Patricia Clarembaux, Anna Clare Spelman, and Celemente Sánchez (Univision Noticias)

Special Recognition: Not all boys are blue by George M. Johnson [filmed reading + performance]

Special Recognition: “Alok Vaid-Menon” 4D with Demi Lovato (Cadence13/OBB Sound/SB Projects)

Special Recognition: CODED: The hidden love of JC Leyendecker (Primary +)

Special Recognition: Peril! Champ Amy Schneider

Special Recognition: The Laverne Cox Show (Shondaland Audio/iHeartMedia)

Special Recognition: Life Out Loud with LZ Granderson (ABC News)

Special Recognition: Outsports coverage of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Special recognition (Spanish language): “Celebrando el Mes del Orgullo” (Telemundo)

The 33rd Annual GLAAD Media Awards recognize media for their fair, accurate and inclusive portrayals of LGBTQ people and issues. Since its inception in 1990, the GLAAD Media Awards have become the world’s most visible annual LGBTQ awards show, sending powerful messages of acceptance to audiences around the world.

“This year’s GLAAD Media Awards come at a time when LGBTQ visibility and storytelling may be the frontline response to a dangerous rise in anti-LGBTQ legislation across the country,” said Sarah Kate Ellis, President- CEO of GLAAD. “Our nominees and winners, including Pose, Sesame Street, Eternals, hacks, Lil Nas Xwe are here and so many journalists and news producers showcase the beautiful diversity of LGBTQ people. When we need them most, these stories speak out against hate, enlighten, entertain and send an undeniable message: we’re not going anywhere.

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Georgian author wins Pulitzer Prize posthumously https://fcacleveland.org/georgian-author-wins-pulitzer-prize-posthumously/ Fri, 13 May 2022 17:54:35 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/georgian-author-wins-pulitzer-prize-posthumously/ Years later, when he finally told his wife, Patsy, what had happened, she encouraged him to tell his story through art. And he did. Using leather as a canvas and the leather carving skills he learned in prison, he began creating beautiful, colorful renderings of people picking cotton, working in the fields, and attending church […]]]>

Years later, when he finally told his wife, Patsy, what had happened, she encouraged him to tell his story through art. And he did. Using leather as a canvas and the leather carving skills he learned in prison, he began creating beautiful, colorful renderings of people picking cotton, working in the fields, and attending church services. They now sell for up to $500,000.

“My photos are about cotton plantations, Jim Crow, the civil rights movement and my time as a prisoner,” Rembert wrote in “Chasing Me to My Grave.” “They celebrate the people I knew and loved and how they lived. These are my memories of black life in the 1950s and 1960s, and how those of us who left the South took it with us and kept it. I want to share my memories with people who have been through what I have been through. Even after finding success as an artist, in Connecticut and New York, I dreamed of returning home.

Rembert first went public with his story in 2020 on NPR’s Storycorps podcast. You can hear him tell it on storycorps.org. His award-winning memoir followed last year and is illustrated with images of Rembert’s artwork. Sadly, he passed away at 75 just a week before publication.

On the Storycorps recording, Patsy Rembert tells her husband, “I wish the world knew what kind of man you are.” Now it is.

Legend

“I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King Jr. Courtesy of HarperCollins

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“I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King Jr. Courtesy of HarperCollins

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Historical partnership: Martin Luther King Jr.’s legendary “I Have A Dream” speech, delivered at the 1963 March on Washington, will be published next month in a new collector’s edition with a foreword by Amanda Gorman, the youngest inaugural poet. presidential in the history of the United States. .

It is the first book published under HarperCollins’ new Martin Luther King Jr. Library imprint, the result of an agreement the company reached last year with the King Estate to become the official publisher of the archives of King. HarperCollins published King’s first book, “Stride Toward Freedom,” in 1958.

The publisher plans to reissue the speech each year with a foreword by a different contemporary writer each time. The book will come with “The Dream Journal,” featuring inspirational quotes from King with space for the owner to jot down their own thoughts.

“I Have a Dream” (HarperCollins, $19.99) goes on sale June 14. It will be published in Spanish, Portuguese, French and German later this year.

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(St. Martin Press)

Credit: TNS

(St. Martin Press)

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(St. Martin Press)

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Credit: TNS

Queen of the Beach Read: For 30 years now, Atlanta’s own Mary Kay Andrews has released a fun, frothy page-turner just in time for beach vacation season, and this year is no different. His latest, “The Homewreckers” (St. Martin’s Press, $28.99), was released to his legion of fans on May 5. Five must be his lucky number, as the book debuted at #5 on the New York Times bestseller.

Both mystery and romance, “The Homewreckers” highlights one of Andrew’s favorite hobbies: fixing old houses. Young widow Hattie Kavanaugh restores homes for a living, but when she tries to strike out on her own and flip a house on her own, it’s a flop. With her confidence at rock bottom, she gets the opportunity to star in a reality show about a beach house renovation featuring a male lead who gets under her skin, for better or worse. During the demolition, evidence is discovered regarding the mysterious disappearance of a young woman many years ago.

Why all of Andrews’ books haven’t been made into TV movies yet, I’ll never know. This one looks like an ideal candidate. Are you paying attention, Hallmark Channel?

Suzanne Van Atten is a literary critic and managing editor for The Atlanta Journal Constitution. Contact her svanatten@ajc.comand follow her on @svanatten.

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Children at Royal Prep School in Haslemere inspired by author’s visit https://fcacleveland.org/children-at-royal-prep-school-in-haslemere-inspired-by-authors-visit/ Thu, 12 May 2022 06:03:12 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/children-at-royal-prep-school-in-haslemere-inspired-by-authors-visit/ THE AUTHOR Jon Gilbert visited the Royal Prep School and inspired students. The pre-prep kids – from reception through 2nd grade – listened with great excitement to Jon reading his fun and informative children’s book Tree Fellas: Olly Oak. Reception class teacher Sammy Collins said: ‘We thought it was a brilliant idea for the acorns […]]]>

THE AUTHOR Jon Gilbert visited the Royal Prep School and inspired students.

The pre-prep kids – from reception through 2nd grade – listened with great excitement to Jon reading his fun and informative children’s book Tree Fellas: Olly Oak.

Reception class teacher Sammy Collins said: ‘We thought it was a brilliant idea for the acorns to play football while the humans weren’t watching, and we could all relate to the feeling of accomplishment. felt when achieving a lifetime goal, like Olly winning the FA Cup.

“We ended the session with a walk in our woods, trying to find our own Olly Oaks.

“What a brilliant morning we all had.”

Children from Royal Prep School’s Little Sailors Nursery also enjoyed story time with Jon, where they learned that baby trees are called saplings and were fascinated to hear the secret that ‘trees take life when children and adults are not watching.

After reading the story, the children went in search of oak trees and their very own Olly.

The 4th and 5th graders were then thrilled to welcome a real-life author to their creative writing club.

Jon was inundated with questions about building a plot, characterization, and what to do when you get writer‘s block.

Prep 5 teacher Clare Mee said, “He was eager to see what the kids were working on.

“He gave Karishma advice on her mystery novel and talked to Phoebe and Ellie about what to do when you have too many ideas.

“Jon enjoyed seeing the children’s mind maps for Olly Oak and then he joined us for lunch to discuss all things bookish.

“It was a privilege to spend time with a professional who inspires our own young authors.”

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Michigan-based ‘Renovated to Death’ author draws inspiration from love of old homes for his first cozy crime novel https://fcacleveland.org/michigan-based-renovated-to-death-author-draws-inspiration-from-love-of-old-homes-for-his-first-cozy-crime-novel/ Tue, 10 May 2022 11:47:22 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/michigan-based-renovated-to-death-author-draws-inspiration-from-love-of-old-homes-for-his-first-cozy-crime-novel/ “In all my previous books, including ‘Lost in the ’90s’ and ‘Drama Queers!’, I set the stories in real cities, like Hazel Park and Ferndale, and made a point of mentioning real places readers would love to recognize, like Country Boy Restaurant, Pronto! and Gigi’s,” Polito told Pride Source. But the cozy mysteries are about […]]]>

“In all my previous books, including ‘Lost in the ’90s’ and ‘Drama Queers!’, I set the stories in real cities, like Hazel Park and Ferndale, and made a point of mentioning real places readers would love to recognize, like Country Boy Restaurant, Pronto! and Gigi’s,” Polito told Pride Source.

But the cozy mysteries are about typical small towns that feature typical small town things, like quaint little town centers with cute little shops. Something Polito’s hometown doesn’t have.

“If I had set the story in Pleasant Ridge and I had a character who owns an antique store, a reader would no doubt have called me.”

The lines of fact and fiction continue to blur throughout “Renovated.” Polito, a Michigan native who lived in New York for 18 years, moved home with his partner Craig Bentley in 2013. Polito and Bentley actually found their home while appearing on the HGTV series “House Hunters.” They now live in a 1924 Craftsman Colonial that they lovingly revived.

In “Renovated,” Polito himself clearly inspired the lead character of writer Peter “PJ” Penwell, who along with his partner, JP Broadway, stars in their own HGTV series “Domestic Partners.” Polito, in real life, loves watching HGTV.

“My partner and I are definitely fans of HGTV, especially ‘Rehab Addict’ with Nicole Curtis because we love seeing Detroit and all of its beautiful historic homes on TV. Funny thing the original title of that book was ‘Rehabbed to Death”, but my editor thought it sounded too much like a drug addiction story, so we changed it.

No drug addiction here, just a good old fashioned murder when a corpse is found in a house that Penwell and Broadway have to renovate for their show. Although “Renovated” is Polito’s first cozy mystery, he does it like an expert, explaining what makes it a good one.

“There are certain tropes to adhere to, because readers have certain expectations for a comfortable mystery story,” he said. “For example, the stories are usually highly PG rated, the murder takes place off-screen, and the protagonist is always a real person and not a trained detective or private investigator.”

HGTV and home renovation are both big right now, especially since the pandemic has forced people to spend more time at home than usual. In the case of Polito and Bentley’s home renovation, they didn’t work as closely together as their fictional counterparts.

“Craig’s old job as an automotive product specialist took him out of town for a bit, so I worked on projects whenever he was away,” Polito said. “That way I could make a big mess and he wouldn’t have to watch it.”

Still, some of the work they did together, like painting the second floor.

“We get along great when we end up working together,” he said. “We’ve been a couple since we were in college, so we know how to give and take and compromise when it comes to getting the job done.”

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author, climate activist raises alarm over Kolkata ‘sinking’ | Kolkata News https://fcacleveland.org/author-climate-activist-raises-alarm-over-kolkata-sinking-kolkata-news/ Sun, 08 May 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/author-climate-activist-raises-alarm-over-kolkata-sinking-kolkata-news/ Kolkata: The city is under threat from climate change and needs a resilience committee to address the problem to plan what will happen and withstand disasters like major floods, said writer and social anthropologist Amitav Ghosh . During a brief trip to his home in south Kolkata on Sunday, Ghosh told TOI that the danger […]]]>
Kolkata: The city is under threat from climate change and needs a resilience committee to address the problem to plan what will happen and withstand disasters like major floods, said writer and social anthropologist Amitav Ghosh . During a brief trip to his home in south Kolkata on Sunday, Ghosh told TOI that the danger to the city stems from the fact that much of it lies below sea level and that a major flood could prove catastrophic for Kolkata.
“Kolkata is threatened for multiple reasons. Much of the city is below sea level and embankments have protected the city for a very long time. I was horrified to find in one of the UN flood impact reports that Dhakuria is one of the most endangered areas. I was alarmed and left thinking of ways to help my mother and sisters in the event of a catastrophic flood,” Ghosh said.
The danger to the city is amplified as the delta region is sinking four times faster than sea level rise, he said. “The sinking is caused by other man-made activities, such as pumping of groundwater, oil and gas. Thus, it will take much longer to get flood relief. People living in flood-prone areas should easy access to canned food and dry cell torches,” he said.
Bangladesh has successfully tackled climate change issues by disseminating information, sending out alerts and regular bulletins, he said. “In fact, Bangladesh has become a world leader in disseminating information on creating climate change resilience programs. There are so many innovations. Together with a Dutch team, they have created oyster beds around their islands to absorb the impact of rising sea levels. Bangladesh successfully banned single-use plastic many years ago . Even the United States couldn’t come close to banning single-use plastic,” the author said.
Ghosh, who has been traveling the Sunderbans for 20 years, found many facilities had reached the more remote areas. “A lot of embankments have been rebuilt and a lot of reinforcements have taken place.” But, he believes, the landfill is not a solution to the problem of the accelerating rate of climate change there. “Embankments cannot withstand sea level rise, nor storm surges,” he said.
People in the Sunderbans have ways of coping with the climate crisis, he stressed. “Many families have kept a small plot indoors, a sort of refuge. Many more migrated to the west coast. Many people from Sunderbans are now working in Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka and Kerala. It’s a huge demographic shift,” he said.
Climate change is a global problem and the global system of governance must deal with it. Ghosh said the geopolitics of climate change is the biggest obstacle to a defined and collective global response to the problems of climate change. “In Paris, deal-rich countries pledged $100 billion for the climate resilience fund, not even a tenth of that has been delivered, and rich countries increased defense spending by $1.2 trillion. of dollars. So, behind the scenes, they are preparing for war. It became clearer with the situation in Ukraine,” Ghosh said.
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The 23-year-old Mzansi Arts and Media Award-nominated South African author shares her journey as a storyteller https://fcacleveland.org/the-23-year-old-mzansi-arts-and-media-award-nominated-south-african-author-shares-her-journey-as-a-storyteller/ Thu, 05 May 2022 13:41:50 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/the-23-year-old-mzansi-arts-and-media-award-nominated-south-african-author-shares-her-journey-as-a-storyteller/ A self-published author had an informative and inspiring conversation with Briefly News about her journey as a young writer Although Omphemetse Maimane was a math and science student in high school, her mother helped her realize her artistic side by entering her in a competition. The 23-year-old has been nominated as Best Writer at the […]]]>
  • A self-published author had an informative and inspiring conversation with Briefly News about her journey as a young writer
  • Although Omphemetse Maimane was a math and science student in high school, her mother helped her realize her artistic side by entering her in a competition.
  • The 23-year-old has been nominated as Best Writer at the Mzansi Arts and Media Awards (MAMA)

PAY ATTENTION: Click “See First” under the “Next” tab to see Briefly News on your News Feed!

Omphemetse Maimane has always been into arts and crafts. From the age of 13, she realized that she wanted to be a writer but didn’t have enough knowledge to share her stories with the world.

The young woman shared a bit of her story with Briefly News about how she found her passion by turning words into captivating adventures, gaining readers around the world and being nominated for a prestigious award.

Read also

Mzansi’s daughter beams as she breaks generational curse by becoming first in her family to graduate from college

South Africa, Author, Mzansi Arts and Media Awards
As a young writer, Omphemetse Maimane comes to life when she finds herself face to face with a blank page and her thoughts. Image: Omphemetse Maimane/Supplied
Source: UGC

The birth of a storyteller

It was her mother who helped her realize that drawing was a form of storytelling and that she was a born storyteller.

Do you like reading our stories? Download the BRIEFLY NEWS app on Google Play now and stay up to date with top South African news!

“She encouraged me to talk to her about my photos – the characters and all. That’s when I got used to drawing and telling story ideas.

Although she was a math and science student at Matlhare Mokautu Secondary School, it was an art competition that opened the door to a talent and a profession that shaped and changed her life.

“Around 2013 and 2014, my mother bought OMO Auto washing powder. There was a contest that was advertised on the front packaging. She participated in the contest for me since it was for children. I won a cash prize of R5,000 and it was announced on Motsweding FM,” she shared.

Read also

Brave Woman Shares Inspirational Story of Overcoming Loss of Funding and Other Struggles to Graduate

Turn words into magic

“I like to write about my life experiences and I also write poetry.”

The 23-year-old admits it took her years for her work to be exposed to the world as it wasn’t until 2021 that she became a published author.

“I’ve published 3 books so far and poems. I don’t have a specific timeframe for writing a book. It depends on what type of book I’m working on, but I take time to work on my books to get good results,” she shared.

The young woman believes that being a self-published author saves her many complications such as signing with publishing houses that are not legitimate because she has heard of people complaining that their work or their money has been stolen.

A nominated author

Omphemetse was named best writer by people who believe in her.

“I got a mention on the Mzansi Arts and Media Awards (MAMA) Facebook page and that’s where I saw that I was nominated.

Read also

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“After a few days, I was given a keyword and a voting line to share with my supporters and anyone who will be interested in voting for me. The awards ceremony will take place on September 10, 2022 at the Carousel Casino .

“This nomination means the world to me! for me writing is therapeutic and anything about writing excites me,” said the author who is supported by her family, friends and fans,” the Rustenburg resident said.

The growth of everything

The mother-of-one shared that she was most proud to be nominated for MAMAs, to be a young writer with 3 published books, to sell her books worldwide and to be read by different people.

“So far, I haven’t encountered any challenges, but I am ready to face them as I progress in my journey. I will take the challenges ahead as motivation and I guess they will make me stronger”, said Omphemetse, who is also busy with other business projects as well as her fourth book.

Read also

Woman Graduates While Working 2 Jobs & Running Hair Business: ‘I’m So Proud I Did This’

Sharing the most encouraging words she has received, Omphemetse said:

“My mother once told me that I was the strongest person she had ever met and I remember the time she said, ‘I knew the day I gave you birth you were born to win”.

Ambitious KZN Poet Tells How Writing Changed His Life

In a separate story, In brief News reported that Xolani Shezi is a 33-year-old poet from KwaZulu-Natal with enough ambition to fuel a small business. Take the time to talk to Briefly.co.za In an exclusive interview, Xolani spoke candidly about her biggest accomplishments, setbacks and hopes for the future.

Xolani explained how he grew up with his mother and grandmother, never having met his father until he was on his deathbed. This is something that deeply marked Xolani in many ways.

“My upbringing was not glamorous. I always faced challenges on a daily basis. Raised by my late mother and my late grandmother. My grandfather died before I was born and my father also passed away before I was born. my birth,” he said.

Source: News in Brief

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The Dutch author arrives at Beatty on May 4 https://fcacleveland.org/the-dutch-author-arrives-at-beatty-on-may-4/ Tue, 03 May 2022 17:29:53 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/the-dutch-author-arrives-at-beatty-on-may-4/ A recently transcribed book has won acclaim for spotlighting a Nye County ghost town and a character who travels back in time to 1907. Marcel Beijer is the author who originally wrote the book in Dutch. In “Golden Mountains”, the protagonist enters a cave in the Netherlands in 1990 and reappears in the rhyolite during […]]]>

A recently transcribed book has won acclaim for spotlighting a Nye County ghost town and a character who travels back in time to 1907.

Marcel Beijer is the author who originally wrote the book in Dutch.

In “Golden Mountains”, the protagonist enters a cave in the Netherlands in 1990 and reappears in the rhyolite during the gold rush. The time traveler befriends a young prostitute until a high-profile murder threatens to disrupt their friendship and life.

Beijer will be at the Beatty Museum at 6 p.m. on May 4, about 5 miles from where part of the book takes place. Beijer traveled several times to visit the ghost town of Rhyolite and became fascinated with the rise and fall of the town. The town was booming in the early 1900s and was once home to over 8,000 people.

On August 9, 1904, a man named Frank “Shorty” Harris made the discovery that sparked one of the biggest mining rushes of the 1900s, according to Western Mining History. The city experienced one of the most spectacular booms in Western history.

At its height, Rhyolite spanned 36 blocks and city lots were given to miners to set up work camps. In 1905 he was estimated.

The desert city’s challenge was its scarce water supply. Three companies competed to supply water from various sources in the region, channeling it for miles and storing it in reservoirs.

By 1909 the town had begun to realize that the mine was no longer producing new ore and it became clear to the locals that Rhyolite would not live long.

The Montgomery Shoshone, the largest producer in the district, operated at a loss in 1910 and in 1911 they closed, devastating Rhyolite’s economy. Lower grade ore was what came out of the mines that was unprofitable to mine and many mines closed.

In 1910, Rhyolite was said to have 675 people in the town, or about 10% of the peak population. By 1916 the town was largely abandoned.

Beijer’s book brings the lost city and its people to life.

Beijer is a Dutch journalist and writer. Golden Mountains is her second novel. He is currently working on his third book, which is expected to be published in 2023.

Contact Jimmy Romo at jromo@reviewjournal.com. To follow @jimi_writes on Twitter.

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Author Interview: Kathleen C. Stone on “They Called Us Girls: Stories of Female Ambition, From Suffrage to Crazy Men” https://fcacleveland.org/author-interview-kathleen-c-stone-on-they-called-us-girls-stories-of-female-ambition-from-suffrage-to-crazy-men/ Sun, 01 May 2022 14:07:14 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/author-interview-kathleen-c-stone-on-they-called-us-girls-stories-of-female-ambition-from-suffrage-to-crazy-men/ By Martha Wolfe “Some women ignored what was expected and pursued careers in fields traditionally reserved for men. In other words, they had “men’s” jobs. I wanted to know where this ambition came from. Kathleen C. Pierre“They called us girls” (Cynren Press) chronicles the inspiring experiences of seven women who, in mid-twentieth-century America, found success […]]]>

By Martha Wolfe

“Some women ignored what was expected and pursued careers in fields traditionally reserved for men. In other words, they had “men’s” jobs. I wanted to know where this ambition came from.

Kathleen C. Pierre“They called us girls” (Cynren Press) chronicles the inspiring experiences of seven women who, in mid-twentieth-century America, found success in professional jobs in male-dominated fields. . Topics artistic fuse Contributor Stone chose to write in her first book – via interviews and extensive historical research – including a social and physical scientist, an artist, a federal judge, two doctors and a spy.

All of the women featured in the book were born before 1935. They were in their 80s and 90s when Stone interviewed them. These go-getters “did not so much oppose cultural norms as ignore them.” None of these women wanted to change the world. They simply could not accept conventional religious, cultural and domestic expectations.

They called us girlThe focus is on how Stone’s subjects – Dahlov Ipcar, Muriel Petioni, Cordelia Hood, Martha Lepow, Mildred Dresselhaus, Frieda Garcia and Rya Zobel – coped with social pressures and gender expectations as they worked to achieve their goals. Notice is taken of the support given by political changes – the 1960 Presidential Commission on the Status of Women, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Equal Credit Opportunity Act of 1974 – but the volume focuses on “individual achievement, woman by woman”. These are women whose professional struggles have helped to entrench the fragile equality we enjoy today.

I asked Stone what prompted her to write They called us girls and why she decided not to take a standard biographical approach.


The fuse of the arts: What question were you trying to answer when you set out to interview women for your book?

Kathleen C. Stone: I wanted to understand what drives some women to venture outside the accepted norms to live a fulfilled life. In the early and mid-twentieth century, when the women I write about came of age, women were seen as the keepers of the home. Only occasionally have they been encouraged to be or do something else. We must remember that discrimination on the basis of sex was legal and that for women entering the paid labor force, most were in jobs considered “appropriate” for the “weaker” sex. But others ignored what was expected and forged careers in fields traditionally reserved for men. In other words, they had “men’s” jobs. I wanted to know where this ambition came from.

As I write in the introduction to the book, my questioning about women like this started when I was a girl. At the time, I watched my dad go to work every morning and my mom stay home. It was typical of my neighborhood, but I knew a few women led different lives. My father had graduated from law school in 1950 and a handful of his classmates were women. I saw their pictures in his yearbook and was intrigued by them. I even fantasized that a secret ingredient explained that they took a different direction from other women. Decades later, when I started working on this book, I had a more mature understanding. Nevertheless, I intended to discover the secret ingredient, so to speak.

A F: You focus on the 7 women, and each has its own chapter. You also include short chapters about yourself that you call “intermezzos”. Why include them?

Calculation: I spent a lot of time on the 7 women – interviewing in person, reviewing transcripts of our conversations, thinking about what was most salient, creating a master chart of their lives, reading the story in order to put their lives in context and, of course, by writing about them. As much as I looked at the details of their lives, I realized I was dealing with a universal theme – our need to understand the society we live in and how we will fit in and where we will adapt in order to develop interests personnel and talents. This, in turn, caused me to reflect on my own path.

Originally, I intended to write in the traditional mode of biography, entirely in the third person. But when I was at Bennington’s writing seminars and working on early drafts of chapters, my teachers and fellow students persuaded me to try a more personal approach. I’m a generation younger than the women in the book, but some of their experiences were familiar to me. Including material from my own life was a way of reflecting on what had changed for women, and what hadn’t, over the years.

A F: What did you learn about the nature of female ambition?

Author Kathleen Stone.

Calculation: In each woman’s young life, she was exposed to a counter-narrative that allowed her to see ways to circumvent norms that might otherwise have limited her opportunities. Often, the counter-narrative came from the family. Some of the fathers held professional roles that their daughters decided to emulate. Although mothers took on such roles less frequently, they were important sources of encouragement and support. Other times, a teacher stepped in as a guide to more education and ambitious career goals.

The word “ambition” can have a negative connotation. The dictionary defines it as a strong desire to achieve fame or fortune. This, to me, implies that any means can be justified to achieve this end. But the women of the book have adopted a different definition. They had a sense of self that allowed them to follow their interests and use their talents in unconventional roles. Instead of fame or fortune, they sought the kind of personal satisfaction one gets from work. And in most cases, their work involved service to others. I don’t think women are always public-minded or service-oriented, but that was usually part of the motivation for these particular women.

A F: Did you study the art of writing a biography at Bennington? And how about interviewing – how did you prepare for this part of your project?

Calculation: I’ll answer about the interview first. For this, I mainly relied on my experience as a lawyer. For years I had interviewed witnesses, asked questions during trial and deposition, and re-enacted events in order to explain them to a judge or jury. The interviews for the book were different, of course. It was a friendly conversation, not a preparation for the trial. Still, sketching out questions ahead of time, talking to the person, responding to unanticipated responses, taking notes, and sparking a narrative were things I had done before.

Reading books is an important component of Bennington’s writing seminars, as you know. My reading list contained more fiction than non-fiction, including books that I felt were important in the evolution of the English-language literary tradition. But, since my book project was in its early stages, I made it a point to read a group biography. Favorites included that of Giorgio Vasari Lives of the best painters, sculptors and architectsby Lytton Strachey Prominent Victoriansand Roger Shattuck The banquet years. For my lecture, which is an integral part of the program, my subject was group biography. Later, I published an article in The Writer‘s Chronicle on the tendency of authors to weave personal material into group biographies. It was really a survey of the literary landscape I was entering with my own book.

A F: What did you read while you were writing They called us girls? I imagine you must have read a good part of 20and century of American history.

Calculation: Absolutely. I wanted to put each woman in her context, which meant I had to expand what I knew about 20and story of the century. For example, for the chapter on Dr. Muriel Petioni, I read about the history of Harlem, racial segregation in medical care, and life in the Jim Crow South where Muriel spent a few years before returning to New York. While writing about Cordelia Hood, I read about the beginnings of the Office of Strategic Services during World War II and some of its accomplishments, and then the beginnings of the Central Intelligence Agency. Another example is the background reading I did on the legal profession. Women were particularly hard pressed to be accepted as lawyers, and I returned to 19and century to understand the discrimination that early lawyers faced. This set the stage for writing about Judge Rya Zobel, the first woman appointed to the federal court in Massachusetts. Judge Zobel became a judge a hundred years after the courts ruled that women shouldn’t be lawyers at all.

I found that reading narrative non-fiction while working on my book inspired me to find my own voice as a writer. No book was a model for me, but a combination of memoir, history, and general non-fiction lit a path. I was working on how to write a collective biography and came to see myself as a kind of navigator, helping the reader navigate the facts of a life to draw conclusions about what was significant.


Martha Wolfe conducted this interview. She is the author of the double biography The Great Hound Dog Match of 1905; Alexander Henry Higginson, Harry Worcester Smith and the Rise of Virginia Hunt Country (Lyons Press, 2015), nominated for the Library of Virginia’s 2016 People’s Choice Literary Award. Ms. Wolfe published in The Boston Globe, Science News, Science Digest, and The Bennington Review. His essay “The Reluctant Sexton” won an honorable mention in Bellevue Literary ReviewLiterary Competition 2018. She is working on a biography of author Mary Lee Settle for West Virginia University Press.

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Local author S. Hilbre Thomson uses New England as the backdrop for her debut thriller https://fcacleveland.org/local-author-s-hilbre-thomson-uses-new-england-as-the-backdrop-for-her-debut-thriller/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:48:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/local-author-s-hilbre-thomson-uses-new-england-as-the-backdrop-for-her-debut-thriller/ Whatever their passions or interests be, many people can relate to the feeling of having something brewing inside that they know or hope will eventually take shape in the real world. For Sue Thomson, mother, wife and local teacher, that passion came in the form of a draft book that she carried with her for […]]]>

Whatever their passions or interests be, many people can relate to the feeling of having something brewing inside that they know or hope will eventually take shape in the real world.

For Sue Thomson, mother, wife and local teacher, that passion came in the form of a draft book that she carried with her for years, both figuratively and literally. Thomson began working on the project before she married, over the years had three children and together with her husband found herself busy raising them in addition to teaching at primary school level. But she always came back to the book one way or another, working on it here, thinking about it there. It never really left her.

Years later, her children had grown up, and Thomson decided to take the opportunity and, with the encouragement of her family, gave it her all in draft, developing it fully into the book she always thought it could be. . The text made its way to The Wild Rose Press, and Thomson found herself with a book deal, a publisher, and before too long a real, living book in her hands. This is in no way to trivialize the amount of work required to complete, let alone successfully publish, a book. Many writers might agree that the end of the writing is where the hardest work begins.

Without giving away too much of the plot, Trevorpublished in March, is written under Thomson’s pseudonym, S. Hilbre Thomson (Hilbre is a surname that honors Thomson’s mother). Trevor is the gripping story of a father grappling with the aftermath of the death of his wife and son. The story goes up several notches when he meets his dead son’s look-alike, Trevor Reed.

The story is as touching as it is exciting, with twists that will be especially entertaining for locals who recognize much of the local landscape from the book, including suburban Boston and New Hampshire’s Lake Winnipesaukee, where Thomson likes to pass. time with his family.

Thomson says being able to dedicate time and work on character development in Trevor was something she really loved. “Being able to create a fictional character, whether it was the protagonist or the antagonist, that was awesome. Being able to make this antagonist really likable in some ways” was an important part of the plot and an opportunity she relished. , “being able to create drama and tension, and including places that mean something to me personally” are all elements of Trevor that Thomson cherishes.

Thomson has always been an avid reader, and having the chance to connect with local bookstores not only as a patron but also as an author is exhilarating. Thomson is excited about the connections it continues to make with local bookstores and the opportunities they provide to showcase Trevor during meetings with local authors, readings, etc.

In discussing with Thomson about Trevor it is not difficult to consider her as the protagonist of her own story. He’s someone you want to succeed.

Learn more about the book or buy it on IndieBound or Amazon.

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