Essay typer – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 19:26:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Essay typer – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 NRC begins license review for innovative molten salt nuclear research reactor https://fcacleveland.org/nrc-begins-license-review-for-innovative-molten-salt-nuclear-research-reactor/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:22:02 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/nrc-begins-license-review-for-innovative-molten-salt-nuclear-research-reactor/ The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has accepted Abilene Christian University’s (ACU) construction license application for a 1 MWth non-power nuclear reactor Molten Salt Research Reactor (MSRR) facility planned for the university campus in Abilene, North Central Texas. The acceptance, which essentially marks NRC’s “registration” of the application, officially initiates the regulator’s review of the ACU’s […]]]>

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has accepted Abilene Christian University’s (ACU) construction license application for a 1 MWth non-power nuclear reactor Molten Salt Research Reactor (MSRR) facility planned for the university campus in Abilene, North Central Texas.

The acceptance, which essentially marks NRC’s “registration” of the application, officially initiates the regulator’s review of the ACU’s Nuclear Energy Experimental Testing (NEXT) laboratory project . NRC said Nov. 21 that due to pre-application activities that began in March 2020, staff expect to complete their environmental and safety reviews by May 2024.

If completed as planned by the end of 2025, the ACU The NEXT lab would be one of the first university molten salt research reactors in the United States.the first academic research reactor of any type in the past 30 years,” the ACU noted.

The university and its partners intend to use the MSRR experimental facilities to “accelerate the development and deploying MSR systems through basic research while developing a new pipeline for a skilled nuclear workforce. The facility will also provide “unique data and information for safety analysis tools and computational methodologies” used for the design and licensing of future commercial reactors, he said.

Abilene Christian University (ACU) leads NEXTRA – the NEXT Research Alliance – among four universities with extensive experience in physics, chemistry and engineering. Launched in the spring of 2019, the consortium’s goal is to design, license and commission the first academic molten salt research reactor, which the ACU will house and own. The other members of the consortium are the Georgia Institute of Technology, Texas A&M University and the University of Texas at Austin. Courtesy of Abilene Christian University

A pioneering molten salt research reactor

ACU’s NEXT Lab Application Seeks a License to Design, Construct, Operate and Decommission a Fluoride-Based Liquid Fuel System MSRR based on molten salt reactor technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 1950s and 1960s. In documents filed with the NRC, the university describes the 1 MWth MSRR as a Moderate graphite core, single region, with fluoride fuel salt flowing through 316H stainless steel fuel system components. The cooling loop, which uses a fluoride-based fluid salt, will be used to cool the fuel system and expel heat to the atmosphere, he said. The MSRR is also “equipped with a gas evolution system that can move fission gases from reactor headspaces through stainless steel circuit components for sequestration and decay,” he said.

“The low-power MSRR is designed to be passively safe,” the ACU noted. “Given the low-power design of the reactor, the overall risk to people and the environment is limited by the small source term and low fission product inventory.” Moreover, the MSRR is “significantly different” from reactors licensed by the NRC in the past and has “several unique safety features not found in solid-fuel systems,” he said. “As an MSR, most of the inherent safety characteristics result from the formulation and properties of the salts and the movement of the salts through the system.”

The MSRR will be powered by a fluorine-based salt containing uranium “containing minimal oxidative impurities”, he said. “The basic composition of fuel is LiF-BeF2-UF4 in a molar ratio of approximately 67:28:5,” he said. U-235 enrichment will be approximately 19.75%, while lithium enrichment in Liseven will be approximately 99.99% or more.

MSRR salts are highly ionic and chemically stable compounds that are immune to radiolysis, the university noted. Although this chemical inertness eliminates the risk of fire or explosion, molten salts provide a suitable medium for heat transfer. “MSRR salts are stable several hundred degrees above obtainable temperatures in the reactor and remain at low vapor pressure,” he said. “The melting point of fuel salt is about 500 C (932 F) and the melting point of coolant salt is about 460 C (890 F). The large negative temperature coefficient of MSRR and its reactivity that passively moderates heat generation also allow for “significant” load following capability, he said.

Main internal elements of the NEXT Lab reactor system and approximate dimensions. Courtesy of Abilene Christian University

Supported by a university consortium with federal support

The university in July contracted Teledyne Brown, a nuclear component and systems design and manufacturing company, to perform preliminary engineering and design work for the facility. The contract is part of a $30.5 million Sponsored Research Agreement (SRA) with Natura Resources, a for-profit entity designed to be the instrument for funding research, in collaboration with the NEXT Research Alliance. This university consortium includes the ACU, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Texas A&M University and the University of Texas at Austin.

According to the ACU, the NEXT lab officially took shape in 2016 after attracting interest from a group of academic benefactors and entrepreneurs. In 2018, the Department of Energy (DOE), then headed by former Texas Governor Rick Perry, expressed interest in the project. The ACU said the research reactor in 2019 became part of the The DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Research Reactor Infrastructure Program, which allows DOE to provide fuel cycle services for MSRR at no cost, as DOE does for other university research.

In a letter to the DOE, the ACU suggested that the research reactor’s MSRR fluorinated salt requirements would require “no more” than 500 kilograms (kg) of high dosage low enriched uranium (HALEU) with an enrichment close to 19.75% and no more than 2,200 kg of enriched lithium.

University documents deposited with the NRC in August suggest that the MSRR’s overnight cost estimates – the cost of the construction project if no interest was incurred during construction – will range between $65 million and $95 million if a contingency is taken into account. Ongoing work by Teledyne Brown, however, should refine the cost and timing of the MSRR building project.

ACU in a statement in august noted that applying for a building permit is one of the eight main steps NEXT Lab has outlined to make the MSRR operational. “The first step was taken last year when the design of the science and engineering research center was completed. Its completion next summer will mark another milestone,” he said. “Formal interactions with the NRC are half of the steps with the submission and approval of the building permit and, later, the operating license. The last two stages are the construction of the reactor and its commissioning,” he said.

Sonal Patel is associate editor of POWER (@sonalcpatel, @POWERmagazine).

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Global market for liver disease diagnostics at $62.6 billion https://fcacleveland.org/global-market-for-liver-disease-diagnostics-at-62-6-billion/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 15:32:59 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/global-market-for-liver-disease-diagnostics-at-62-6-billion/ Portland, OR, Nov. 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — According to the report released by Allied Market Research, the Liver Disease Diagnostics Market generated $34.5 billion in 2021 and is expected to reach $62.6 billion by 2031, growing at a CAGR of 6.1% from 2022 to 2031. changing market trends, market size and estimates, value chain, […]]]>

Portland, OR, Nov. 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — According to the report released by Allied Market Research, the Liver Disease Diagnostics Market generated $34.5 billion in 2021 and is expected to reach $62.6 billion by 2031, growing at a CAGR of 6.1% from 2022 to 2031. changing market trends, market size and estimates, value chain, key investment pockets, drivers and opportunities, competitive landscape and regional landscape. The report is a useful source of information for new entrants, shareholders, early adopters and stockholders in introducing necessary strategies for the future and taking essential actions to significantly strengthen and increase their position in the market.

Download a free sample report (PDF of 203 pages with information, graphs, tables, figures): https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-sample/8790

Report coverage and details:

Report cover Details
Forecast period 2022–2031
Market size in 2031 $62.6 billion
CAGR 6.1%
Number of pages in the report 203
Segments Covered Technique, end use and region.
Drivers Increase in unhealthy lifestyles in people
Increased alcohol consumption
Opportunities Increase in demand for minimally invasive diagnostic procedure for diagnosis of liver diseases
Increase in smoking habits in people
holds back Exorbitant cost of treatment


COVID-19 scenario:

  • The COVID-19 outbreak has negatively impacted the growth of the global liver disease diagnostics market, owing to the prevalence of lockdowns in various countries around the world.
  • Lockdowns have resulted in increased focus and reliance on COVID-19 infected patients due to the disease’s high mortality rate. Thus, diagnostic treatments for liver disease have either been postponed or canceled due to the increase in coronavirus cases.
  • Apart from this, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased awareness of physical, mental and emotional health. This, in turn, has increased awareness of liver disease diagnosis and increased regular check-ups using liver disease diagnostics. Thus, such development is expected to bring stabilization and boost the growth of the liver disease diagnostics market over the forecast period.

The report offers a detailed segmentation of the global liver disease diagnostics market on the basis of technique, end-use, and region. The report provides a comprehensive analysis of each segment and their respective sub-segment using graphical and tabular representation. This analysis can essentially help market players, investors and new entrants to determine and design strategies based on the fastest growing and highest revenue generating segments mentioned in the report.

Purchase order :
https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/purchase-enquiry/8790

Based on the technique, the imaging segment held the largest market share in 2021, holding more than two-fifths of the global market, and is expected to maintain its leading status during the forecast period. The laboratory testing segment, on the other hand, is expected to quote the fastest CAGR of 6.6% during the forecast period.

Based on end-use, the hospital segment held the dominant market share in 2021, holding more than two-fifths of the global market, and is expected to maintain its leading status during the forecast period. The laboratory segment, on the other hand, is expected to quote the fastest CAGR of 6.6% during the forecast period.

According to the region, the North American market held the lion’s share in 2021, holding more than two-fifths of the global market, and is expected to maintain its leading status during the forecast period. The Asia-Pacific region, on the other hand, is expected to quote the fastest CAGR of 8.3% during the forecast period. The report also analyzed other market regions such as Europe and LAMEA.

Key players analyzed in the Global Liver Disease Diagnostics Market report include Abbott Laboratories, Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc., Cosara Diagnostics Pvt Ltd, Echosens, Meril Life Sciences Pvt. Ltd., PerkinElmer, Qiagen NV, Siemens AG, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Trivitron Healthcare.

The report analyzes these key players of the global liver disease diagnostics market. These market players have effectively used strategies such as joint ventures, collaborations, expansion, new product launches, partnerships, and others to maximize their foothold and prowess in the industry. The report is useful for analyzing recent developments, product portfolio, business performance, and operating segments of major market players.


Reports on trends in the healthcare industry (book now with 10% discount):

Pharmaceutical packaging market by type of product (parenteral containers, plastic bottles, blister packaging, closures, specialized bags, labels and others), material (glass, aluminum foils, plastics and polymers, paper and cardboard and others): analysis of opportunities and industry forecast, 2020 -2030

In vitro diagnostics market By product and services (reagents, instruments, software and services), by technique (immunodiagnostics, hematology, molecular diagnostics, tissue diagnostics, clinical chemistry, others), by application (infectious diseases, cancer, heart diseases, immune system disorders, Nephrology, Gastrointestinal Diseases, Others), By End-User (Autonomous Laboratories, Hospitals, University & Medical Schools, Point-of-Care, Others): Global Opportunities Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2020-2030

DNA Sequencing Market by product (consumable, instrument and service) application (biomarkers and cancer, diagnostics, reproductive health, personalized medicine, forensics and others), technology (sequencing by synthesis, semiconductor ion sequencing, ligation sequencing, pyrosequencing, real single molecule – temporal sequencing, chain termination sequencing and nanopore sequencing) and end user (academic and government research institutes, pharmaceutical companies, biotechnology companies and hospitals and clinics): analysis of global opportunities and industry forecast, 2020- 2030

Medical tourism market By Type of Treatment (Dental Treatment, Cosmetic Treatment, Cardiovascular Treatment, Orthopedic Treatment, Neurological Treatment, Cancer Treatment, Fertility Treatment and Others): Global Opportunities Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2020-2030

Multiplex Dosing Market by type (protein-based multiplex assays, nucleic acid-based multiplex assay and other multiplex assays), product (reagents and consumables, instruments and accessories, software and services), application (clinical diagnostics, research and development and companion diagnostics ) and End User (Hospitals, Clinical Laboratories, Research Institutes, and Pharmaceutical and Biotech Companies): Global Opportunities Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2020-2030


About Us

Allied Market Research (AMR) is a full-service market research and business consulting division of Allied Analytics LLP based in Portland, Oregon. Allied Market Research provides global corporations as well as small and medium enterprises with unparalleled quality of “Market research reportsand “Business Intelligence Solutions”. AMR has a focused vision to provide business insights and advice to help its clients make strategic business decisions and achieve sustainable growth in their respective market area.

We maintain professional relationships with various companies which helps us to extract market data which helps us to generate accurate research data tables and confirm the utmost accuracy of our market predictions. Allied Market Research CEO Pawan Kumar helps inspire and encourage everyone associated with the company to maintain high quality data and help clients in every way possible to achieve success. All data presented in the reports we publish are drawn from primary interviews with senior managers of large companies in the relevant field. Our secondary data sourcing methodology includes extensive online and offline research and discussions with knowledgeable industry professionals and analysts.

The Web: https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/reports-store/life-sciences

        
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ParseCNV2: efficient sequencing tool for genome-wide copy number variation association studies https://fcacleveland.org/parsecnv2-efficient-sequencing-tool-for-genome-wide-copy-number-variation-association-studies/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 02:21:22 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/parsecnv2-efficient-sequencing-tool-for-genome-wide-copy-number-variation-association-studies/ Wang K, Li M, Hadley D, Liu R, Glessner J, Grant SF, et al. PennCNV: An integrated hidden Markov model designed for high-resolution copy number variation detection in whole genome SNP genotyping data. Genome Res. 2007;17:1665–74. CAS PubMed Article PubMed Central Google Scholar Chang CC, Chow CC, Tellier LC, Vattikuti S, Purcell SM, Lee JJ. […]]]>
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    Sewage analysis and detection of poliovirus type 2 genetically related to the virus isolated from a case of paralytic poliomyelitis — New York, March 9 to October 11, 2022 https://fcacleveland.org/sewage-analysis-and-detection-of-poliovirus-type-2-genetically-related-to-the-virus-isolated-from-a-case-of-paralytic-poliomyelitis-new-york-march-9-to-october-11-2022/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 21:46:59 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/sewage-analysis-and-detection-of-poliovirus-type-2-genetically-related-to-the-virus-isolated-from-a-case-of-paralytic-poliomyelitis-new-york-march-9-to-october-11-2022/ US Poliovirus Response Team 2022 Bridget J. Anderson, New York State Department of Health; Noelle Anderson, CDC; Jed A. Augustin, CDC; Megan Baldwin, New York State Department of Health; Kelly Barrett, New York State Department of Health; Ursula Bauer, New York State Department of Health; Andrew Beck, CDC; Hanen Belgasmi, CDC; Lydia J. Bennett, New […]]]>

    US Poliovirus Response Team 2022

    Bridget J. Anderson, New York State Department of Health; Noelle Anderson, CDC; Jed A. Augustin, CDC; Megan Baldwin, New York State Department of Health; Kelly Barrett, New York State Department of Health; Ursula Bauer, New York State Department of Health; Andrew Beck, CDC; Hanen Belgasmi, CDC; Lydia J. Bennett, New York State Department of Health; Achal Bhatt, CDC; Blog by Debra, CDC; Heather Boss, Orange County Health Department; Isaac Ravi Brenner, New York State Department of Health; Barrett Brister, CDC; Travis Wayne Brown, CDC; Tavora Buchman, Nassau County Health Department; James Bullows, CDC; Kara Connelly, New York State Department of Health; Blaise Cassano, Rockland County Health Department; Christina J. Castro, CDC; Cynthia Cirillo, Nassau County Health Department; George Edward Cone, CDC; Janine Cory, CDC; Amina Dasin, CDC; Adina de Coteau, CDC; Anny DeSimone, Nassau County Health Department; Françoise Chauvin, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Cynthia Dixey, CDC; Kathleen Dooling, CDC; Shani Doss, CDC; Christopher Duggar, CDC; Christopher N. Dunham, Syracuse University; Delia Easton, New York State Department of Health; Christina Egan, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Brian D. Emery, CDC; Randall English, CDC; Nicola Faraci, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Hannah Fast, CDC; G. Stephanie Feumba, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Nancy Fischer, Nassau County Health Department; Stephen Flores, CDC; Ann D. Frolov, CDC; Halle Getachew, CDC; Brittany Gianetti, CDC; Alejandro Godinez, New York State Department of Health; Todd Gray, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; William Gregg, CDC; Christina Gulotta, New York State Department of Health; Sarah Hamid, CDC; Tiffany Hammette, CDC; Rafael Harpaz, CDC; Lia Haynes Smith, CDC; Brianna Hanson, New York State Department of Health; Elizabeth Henderson, CDC; Eugene Heslin, New York State Department of Health; Alexandra Hess, CDC; Dina Hoefer, New York State Department of Health; Jonathan Hoffman, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Lyndsey Hoyt, New York State Department of Health; Scott Hughes, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Anna Rose Hutcheson, CDC; Tabassum Insaf, New York State Department of Health; Christopher Ionta, CDC; Stacey Jeffries Miles, CDC; Anita Kambhampati, CDC; Haley R. Kappus-Kron, New York State Department of Health; Genevieve N. Keys, CDC; Michael Kharfen, New York State Department of Health; Gimin Kim, CDC; Jenna Knox, Sullivan County Department of Public Health; Stephanie Kovacs, CDC; Julie Krauchuk, Rockland County Health Department; Elisabeth R. Krow-Lucal, CDC; Daryl Lamson, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Jennifer Laplante, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; David A. Larsen, Syracuse University; Ruth Link-Gelles, CDC; Hongmei Liu, CDC; James Lueken, CDC; Kevin Ma, CDC; Rachel L. Marine, CDC; Karen A. Mason, CDC; James McDonald, New York State Department of Health; Kathleen McDonough, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Kevin McKay, Rockland County Health Department; Eva McLanahan, CDC; Eric Medina, Rockland County Health Department; Haillie Meek, CDC; Gul Mehnaz Mustafa, CDC; Megan Meldrum, New York State Department of Health; Elizabeth Mello, Rockland County Health Department; Jeffrey W. Mercante, CDC; Mandar Mhatre, Rockland County Health Department; Susan Miller, New York State Department of Health; Natalie Migliore, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Neida K. Mita-Mendoza, New York State Department of Health; Amruta Moghe, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Nehalraza Momin, CDC; Tanner Morales, Rockland County Health Department; E. Joe Moran, New York State Department of Health; Grace Nabakooza, CDC; Dana Neigel, New York State Department of Health; Simon Ogbamikael, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Jason O’Mara, Rockland County Health Department; Stephanie Ostrowski, New York State Department of Health; Manisha Patel, CDC; Prabasaj Paul, CDC; Atefeh Paziraei, CDC; Georgina Peacock, CDC; Lauren Pearson, CDC; Jonatha Plitnick, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Alicia Pointer, Orange County Department of Health; Michael Popowich, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Chitra Punjabi, Rockland County Health Department; Rama Ramani, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Shailla J. Raymond, New York State Department of Health; Lindsey Rickerman, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Erik Rist, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Angela C. Robertson, CDC; Shannon L. Rogers, CDC; Jennifer B. Rosen, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Cecelia Sanders, CDC; Jeanne Santoli, CDC; Leanna Sayyad, CDC; Lynsey Schoultz, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Matthew Shudt, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Justin Smith, CDC; Theresa L. Smith, CDC; Maria Souto, Rockland County Health Department; Ashleigh Staine, CDC; Shannon Stokley, CDC; Hong Sun, CDC; Andrew J. Terranella, CDC; Ashley Tippins, CDC; Farrell Tobolowsky, CDC; Megan Wallace, CDC; Steve Wassilak, CDC; Amanda Wolfe, Sullivan County Department of Public Health; Eileen Yee, CDC.

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    Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test Market Size and Forecast https://fcacleveland.org/global-bilirubin-colorimeter-test-market-size-and-forecast/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 21:11:15 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/global-bilirubin-colorimeter-test-market-size-and-forecast/ New Jersey, United States – Verified Market Research has announced the release of a new research report to its ever-growing repository. It highlights the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test Market. The Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay research report is assembled using primary and secondary research methodologies to provide users with an accurate analysis of market dynamics. Analysts […]]]>

    New Jersey, United States – Verified Market Research has announced the release of a new research report to its ever-growing repository. It highlights the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test Market. The Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay research report is assembled using primary and secondary research methodologies to provide users with an accurate analysis of market dynamics. Analysts have used SWOT analysis and Porter’s Five Forces analysis to provide readers with a detailed understanding of the influence of different market dynamics. It answers questions related to the current market size and its estimated valuation at the end of the forecast period. In addition, the report also includes an assessment of the segments of the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market to explain the progress of the regional market during the forecast period.

    The important part of the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay report includes the competitive landscape. Analysts have studied some of the major companies in the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test Market. Financial outlook, expansion plans, research and development strategies, and merger and acquisition plans have been present in the research report. As a whole, the research report aims to give its readers a holistic view of the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test Market.

    Get Sample Full PDF Copy of Report: (Including Full Table of Contents, List of Tables and Figures, Chart) @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/download-sample/?rid=30419

    Key Players Mentioned in the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay Market Research Report:

    Cell Biolabs BioVision Inc., Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, Euro Diagnostics Systems, Excel Diagnostics Pvt. ltd.

    Key companies operating in the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market are also studied extensively in the report. The Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay report offers a pin-point understanding of the vendor landscape and development plans, which are expected to take place in the near future. This report as a whole will serve as an effective tool for market players to understand the competitive scenario in the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market and plan their strategic activities accordingly.

    Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay Market Segmentation:

    Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay Market, By Bilirubin Type

    • Unconjugated bilirubin (indirect bilirubin)
    • Conjugated bilirubin (direct bilirubin)

    Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay Market, By Disease

    • Jaundice
    • Liver dysfunction
    • Hepatitis
    • Hemolytic anemia
    • Others

    The report also examines possible threats to the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market. It highlights the undercurrents that should tip the market in the opposite direction. Analysts have taken great care to present this information with careful calculation. However, the restraining factors come with an explanation of how to overcome the increasing stress on players. The report provides a unique insight into lucrative market segments that could be a game-changer for the overall Bilirubin Colorimeter Test Market. The analysts explained the possible technologies and type of research approach that could help the market turn constraints into opportunities.

    In successive chapters, the reports study the segments present in the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market. The market is segmented on the basis of application, product type, service, and end users. Each of these segments has a dedicated chapter, which highlights the reasons for its rise and fall. Analysts have justified the reasons for the progress of each of these segments. End-user approach, affordability, sustainability, and business impact have been thoroughly studied by analysts to understand the changing segments of the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market. Additionally, the regional segment includes an explanation of the factors influencing each regional market. Government policies and climate change have been discussed in this part of the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay report.

    Inquire for a discount on this Premium Report @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/ask-for-discount/?rid=30419

    What to expect in our report?

    (1) A comprehensive section of the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market report is devoted to market dynamics, which includes influencing factors, market drivers, challenges, opportunities, and trends.

    (2) Another broad section of the research study is reserved for the regional analysis of the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test Market where important regions and countries are assessed for growth potential, consumption, market share and other vital factors indicating their market growth.

    (3) Players can use the competitive analysis provided in the report to develop new strategies or refine their existing strategies to meet market challenges and increase share of the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market.

    (4) The report also examines the competitive situation and trends and sheds light on company expansions and ongoing mergers and acquisitions in the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market. Moreover, it sheds light on the market concentration rate and market shares of top three and top five players.

    (5) Readers receive the results and conclusion of the research study provided in the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Assay Market report.

    Key questions answered by the report:

    (1) What are the growth opportunities for new entrants in the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Testing industry?

    (2) Who are the key players operating in the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market?

    (3) What are the key strategies participants are likely to adopt to increase their share in the global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test industry?

    (4) What is the competitive situation in the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test Market?

    (5) What are the emerging trends that may be influencing the growth of the Global Bilirubin Colorimeter Test market?

    (6) Which product type segment will have a high CAGR in the future?

    (7) Which application segment will capture a good share of the global colorimetric bilirubin industry?

    (8) Which region is lucrative for manufacturers?

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    Metagenomics Market | Exclusive revenue report and https://fcacleveland.org/metagenomics-market-exclusive-revenue-report-and/ Tue, 11 Oct 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/metagenomics-market-exclusive-revenue-report-and/ Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., Oct. 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Transparency Market Research Inc. – Next-generation metagenomic sequencing (NGS) has demonstrated enormous potential in the diagnosis of neuro-infectious diseases, particularly CNS infectious diseases, on which companies are keenly capitalizing. Advancements in NGS platforms and bioinformatics tools are creating new revenue streams for major players in the […]]]>

    Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., Oct. 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Transparency Market Research Inc.Next-generation metagenomic sequencing (NGS) has demonstrated enormous potential in the diagnosis of neuro-infectious diseases, particularly CNS infectious diseases, on which companies are keenly capitalizing. Advancements in NGS platforms and bioinformatics tools are creating new revenue streams for major players in the metagenomics market. The metagenomics market is expected to reach US$6.1 billion by 2030

    The study analysts have observed that growing concerns over infectious diseases on human health will influence the dynamics of the future market demand for metagenomics. It should be noted that the application of metagenomics-enabled microbial surveillance to reduce the frequency of outbreaks in the future has opened up new growth prospects for the metagenomics market players.

    Get an exclusive sample PDF copy of Metagenomics Market https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=S&rep_id=52695

    The demand for metagenomics tools in food microbiology is abundant. TMR analysts in the study found that the food and beverage segment is highly lucrative. The use of next-generation sequencing to improve food safety will increase and broaden the horizon of lucrative demand in the food and beverage industry.

    Main results of Metagenomics Market Research

    • R&D in Bioinformatics youoh Help Expand revenue streams: Advances in bioinformatics tools are gradually simplifying the reading of metagenomic data. These have vehemently fueled the advancements in microbial ecology and hence have driven the expansion of the metagenomics market. A host of new tools are being adopted to enrich bioinformatics analyzes in metagenomics, and thus have boosted the market prospects. Their plentiful demand among healthcare businesses for the diagnosis of neuro-infectious diseases will expand the lucrative avenues during the forecast period 2020-2030.
    • The growing use of metagenomic sequencing in disease diagnosis creates a lucrative avenue: Growing demand for metagenomic sequencing for drug discovery and disease diagnosis will propel revenue streams for companies in the metagenomics market. Use is increasing in infectious disease management, where next-generation metagenomic sequencing holds incredible potential for identifying pathogens and assessing their diversity. It should be noted that the use of technologies has grown in clinical diagnostics. Additionally, end-to-end microbiome platforms by next-generation sequencing service providers have unlocked huge revenue potential for metagenomics market players, the study authors observed.
    • Companies are exploring new bioinformatics technologies to meet demand Of Soil Health Assessment: Microbial ecologists are exploiting shotgun metagenomics to assess soil microbial diversity. In addition, flow cytometry-enabled mini-metagenomics is expected to gain traction in understanding forest floor microbial diversity, thereby providing additional opportunities for metagenomics market players.

    Ask for references – https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=ARF&rep_id=52695

    Metagenomics market: main drivers

    • The need for advanced technologies for the rapid diagnosis of neuroinfectious diseases is a key factor underpinning the market outlook for next-generation metagenomic sequencing technologies. The incidence and burden of infectious diseases in general is a key driver for investments in metagenomics market activities.
    • Growing concerns of climate change on soil biodiversity is a key driver for the application of soil metagenome projects, thereby increasing the metagenomics market size.

    Metagenomics market: regional growth dynamics

    • North America held a major share of the global metagenomics market in 2019. The region is rife with opportunities with rapid adoption of various metagenomics sequencing platforms. Extensive research on finding new diagnostic strategies for the detection and characterization of SARS-CoV-2 has boosted research spending in the region.
    • Europe was another lucrative market in 2019, accounting for a key market share. The increased adoption of bioinformatics tools has fueled growth opportunities. Additionally, the relentless research on microbial ecology and soil diversity has catalyzed the application of metagenomics, thereby enhancing the revenue potential of the regional market.

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    Metagenomics Market: Key Players

    Most of the key players in the metagenomics market are relying on expanding their product portfolio and aiming to strengthen their position in different geographies.

    Some of the major ones are Computomics GmbH, PerkinElmer, Inc., Microsynth AG, Zymo Research, Eurofins Scientific, Arc Bio, LLC., Takara Bio, Inc., Novogene Co., Ltd., Promega Corporation, Illumina, Inc., QIAGEN and Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.

    Metagenomics market segmentation

    type of product

    • Instruments
    • Kits and reagents
    • Software and services

    Technology

    • 16S sequencing
    • Whole genome sequencing
    • Shotgun sequencing
    • Others

    Application

    • Ecology & Environment
    • Clinical diagnosis
    • drug discovery
    • Biotechnology
    • Food and drinks
    • Others

    Region

    • North America
    • Europe
    • Asia Pacific
    • Latin America
    • Middle East and Africa

    Modernization of healthcare in terms of infrastructure and services has pushed the healthcare industry to new heights, stay updated with Last Health Care Research Reports by Transparency Market Research:

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    Kerala bans sale of all drugs by Sonepat firm : The Tribune India https://fcacleveland.org/kerala-bans-sale-of-all-drugs-by-sonepat-firm-the-tribune-india/ Sun, 09 Oct 2022 06:22:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/kerala-bans-sale-of-all-drugs-by-sonepat-firm-the-tribune-india/ Tribune press service Bhartesh Singh Thakur Chandigarh, October 8 Kerala has banned the sale of all drugs manufactured by Sonepat-based Maiden Pharmaceuticals. Earlier, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued an alert over four syrups from the firm on October 5 after 66 children died in The Gambia. Confirming the development in a chat […]]]>


    Tribune press service

    Bhartesh Singh Thakur

    Chandigarh, October 8

    Kerala has banned the sale of all drugs manufactured by Sonepat-based Maiden Pharmaceuticals. Earlier, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued an alert over four syrups from the firm on October 5 after 66 children died in The Gambia.

    Confirming the development in a chat with The Tribune, Kerala State Drugs Comptroller PM Jayan said: “We have issued orders to stop the sale of all drugs manufactured by Maiden Pharmaceuticals. They have a few products on the market. We will take samples and test each one. Based on the results, we will authorize the sale. Regarding the blanket ban, Jayan said the decision was taken in view of the death of 66 children in The Gambia. The WHO also said laboratory analysis of samples of each of the four syrups made by Maiden Pharmaceuticals confirmed that they contained unacceptable amounts of diethylene glycol and ethylene glycol as contaminants.

    The four syrups suspected of being responsible for the deaths of 66 children in The Gambia are Promethazine oral solution, Kofexmalin baby cough syrup, Makoff baby cough syrup and Magrip cold syrup NOT.

    According to the Centre’s Xtended Licensing, Laboratory and Legal Node website, Maiden Pharmaceuticals’ metformin tablets, which are used to treat type 2 diabetes, failed the quality test in Ernakulum district of Kerala on September 28. . The remarks on the website read, “The sample does not comply with the Indian Pharmacopoeia (IP) 2018. This particular batch of the sample fails the dissolution test. Therefore, declared as not of quality standard.”

    Another product from the same firm, Easiprin tablets, which is an gastro-resistant aspirin, failed on June 30 in the district of Kannur (Kerala). It also did not comply with the IP standards and the product failed the “descriptive part” and the “Salicylic acid test”.

    Maiden Pharmaceuticals’ MAICAL-D tablets failed the content assay test on March 24. The samples were taken from Taluk Hospital, Attingal (Kerala), and found to be of “non-standard quality”.

    On March 19, metformin tablets failed the test in Pallakad. The remarks said “The samples fail the dissolution test and are therefore declared not to be of standard quality.” The same product from Maiden Pharmaceuticals failed dissolution and dosage tests on December 21, 2021 in Kollam.

    Regarding the failed samples, Jayan said, “I can only comment on the filing of lawsuits after seeing the file.”

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    Katie Couric Breast Cancer | MedPage today https://fcacleveland.org/katie-couric-breast-cancer-medpage-today/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 23:00:26 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/katie-couric-breast-cancer-medpage-today/ In 2000, 2 years after her husband Jay Monahan died of colon cancer, Katie Couric underwent a colonoscopy live on “The Today Show”, leading to a 20% increase in national colonoscopy screening rates , which the University of Michigan has dubbed the “couric effect.” Now Couric is again advocating for cancer screening. On September 28, […]]]>

    In 2000, 2 years after her husband Jay Monahan died of colon cancer, Katie Couric underwent a colonoscopy live on “The Today Show”, leading to a 20% increase in national colonoscopy screening rates , which the University of Michigan has dubbed the “couric effect.”

    Now Couric is again advocating for cancer screening.

    On September 28, Couric wrote an essay on her website, detailing her breast cancer diagnosis in June. During a routine visit to the doctor, she was told she needed to have a mammogram. Although she thought she “just had one,” her last mammogram was actually in December 2020, she wrote. She made an appointment right away.

    She intended to film her mammogram to share on her website. If she forgot to make an appointment during the pandemic, surely others must have forgotten too, and it could be a reminder for them, she said. While a technician filmed her, she underwent a 3D mammogram – and due to her history of dense breasts – a breast ultrasound.

    Afterwards, her breast radiologist, Susan Drossman, MD, told her there was something in her left breast that looked suspicious, recommending a needle biopsy to check it out.

    The next day, Couric was diagnosed with stage IA HER2 negative breast cancer. She underwent a lumpectomy in July, followed by 15 rounds of radiation therapy. She will soon be starting aromatase inhibitor therapy to lower her estrogen levels.

    In a Today interview with Savannah Guthrie and Hoda Kotb, Couric explained her new mission to raise awareness of the need for breast cancer screening, noting that only 70% of eligible women receive screening (and that rate has dropped even further during the pandemic), and to educate women about dense breasts and how this condition may be linked to breast cancer.

    Couric said 45-50% of women have dense breasts, which is diagnosed by mammography. Having dense breasts makes breast cancer detection more difficult. Additional breast ultrasound screening is often recommended for these women. However, only 38 states have laws that require physicians to notify patients that they have dense breasts, and even in states that do, the notification does not necessarily explain clearly what to do with this information. .

    Additionally, not all insurance plans cover breast ultrasound (only 14 states and Washington, DC require insurance companies to at least partially cover the test).

    Couric is working with Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.) on legislation that would ensure women and their healthcare providers have access to breast density information to make informed healthcare decisions. DeLauro will also introduce legislation this month that would require insurance companies to fully cover breast ultrasound costs for women with dense breasts.

    Breast cancer

    Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer in women in the United States, with approximately 51,400 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 287,850 cases of invasive disease diagnosed in 2022, according to the American Cancer Society. . Although the widespread adoption of breast cancer screening has increased the incidence of breast cancer, it has also changed the characteristics of the cancers detected, with an increase in the number of low-risk cancers, precancerous lesions and DCIS.

    Breast cancer is usually treated with various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. According to the National Cancer Institute, the choice of treatment can be influenced by the following clinical and pathological characteristics:

    • Menopausal status
    • Disease stage
    • Primary tumor grade
    • Tumor Estrogen Receptor (ER) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) Status
    • Overexpression and/or amplification of HER2
    • Histological type

    The use of molecular profiling in breast cancer includes ER and PR status testing, HER2 status testing, and gene profile testing by chip assay or RT-PCR (e.g. MammaPrint, Oncotype DX, Prosigna) . Based on the ER, PR, and HER2 results, breast cancer is classified into one of the following types:

    • Hormone receptor positive
    • HER2 positive
    • Triple negative (ER, PR and HER2 negative)

    ER, PR, and HER2 status are important in determining prognosis and predicting response to endocrine and HER2 therapies.

    Breast density

    The breasts contain glandular, connective and fatty tissue. Breast density describes the relative amounts of these tissues. Dense breasts have relatively high amounts of glandular and fibrous connective tissue and relatively low amounts of fatty tissue.

    Breast density is determined by mammography – it is not something that can be determined by a physical breast exam.

    Breast density can be hereditary, but other factors can influence it. Lower breast density is associated with increased age, childbirth, and tamoxifen use. Factors associated with higher breast density include use of post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy and low body mass index.

    Breast density is categorized using a scale developed by the American College of Radiology called the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), which helps radiologists interpret mammogram results. BI-RADS divides breast density into four categories:

    • A: Almost entirely fatty breast tissue, present in about 10% of women
    • B: Scattered areas of dense glandular tissue and fibrous connective tissue (sparse fibroglandular breast tissue) found in approximately 40% of women
    • C: Dense heterogeneous breast tissue with many areas of glandular tissue and fibrous connective tissue, found in approximately 40% of women
    • D: extremely dense breast tissue, present in about 10% of women

    Is there a relationship between dense breasts and breast cancer?

    Yes – in two ways. First, it is more difficult to detect breast cancer in dense breasts. Dense breast tissue and some abnormal breast changes, such as calcifications and tumors, show up as white areas on the mammogram. Therefore, mammography is less sensitive in women with dense breasts. Women with dense breasts may be called back for follow-up testing more often than women with oily breasts. Dense breasts can also put women at higher risk for interval breast cancer.

    Second, several studies have shown that women with dense breasts have an increased risk of breast cancer. Women with extremely dense breasts have a four to six times higher risk of breast cancer than those with oily breasts. This is independent of the effect of breast density on the interpretation of mammography.

    Are additional tests warranted for women with dense breasts?

    This is the big question, and unfortunately it has not yet received a satisfactory answer. The latest recommendations from the U.S. Task Force on Preventive Services in 2016 stated that “current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of additional breast cancer screening using breast ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) , digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), or other methods in women identified as having dense breasts on an otherwise negative screening mammogram.”

    These recommendations are currently under review, and it is not known when the updated recommendations will be released. Until then, women with dense breasts should talk with their healthcare providers about tailoring screening to each patient’s breast density and overall lifetime risk of breast cancer.

    A 2021 Mayo Clinic Proceedings review highlighted the benefits and limitations of various additional screening tests available for women with dense breasts, including:

    • DBT, which X-rays the breast in an arc for multi-angle images that are reconstructed into a 3D image. This reduces image overlap and increases the sensitivity of mammography. Many hospitals and large centers use DBT as the standard screening mammogram; however, this technique is not available everywhere.
    • Whole breast ultrasound has become a common additional screening method for many women with dense breasts. It is widely available, has no ionizing radiation, and can effectively differentiate between tissues of different densities (liquid vs. soft tissue). It can also allow a doctor to take a real-time biopsy of a suspicious lesion. However, this can lead to false positive results.
    • Breast MRI is the most sensitive test for detecting breast cancer. Like ultrasound, there is no ionizing radiation. It also reduces the risk of interval cancers. Compared to other modalities, it is more expensive, requires a gadolinium contrast agent, and cannot be used in patients with morbid obesity or severe claustrophobia.

    Michele R. Berman, MD, is a pediatrician turned medical journalist. She trained at Johns Hopkins, Washington University in St. Louis, and St. Louis Children’s Hospital. Its mission is both journalistic and educational: to report on common diseases affecting uncommon people and to summarize the evidence-based medicine behind the headlines.

    ]]>
    Human Microbiome Sequencing Market to Register Exponential CAGR by 2030 – InsightAce Analytic Exclusive Report https://fcacleveland.org/human-microbiome-sequencing-market-to-register-exponential-cagr-by-2030-insightace-analytic-exclusive-report/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 17:26:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/human-microbiome-sequencing-market-to-register-exponential-cagr-by-2030-insightace-analytic-exclusive-report/ Global Human Microbiome Sequencing Market Insights Global Human Microbiome Sequencing Market Segmentation The global human microbiome sequencing market is estimated to exhibit a CAGR of 20.31% during the forecast period. Leading Players in Human Microbiome Sequencing Market: Baseclear BV, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) Genomics Co, Ltd, Charles River Laboratories International Inc., Clinical Microbiomics” — Insightace […]]]>

    Global Human Microbiome Sequencing Market Insights

    Global Human Microbiome Sequencing Market Segmentation

    Global Human Microbiome Sequencing Market Segmentation

    The global human microbiome sequencing market is estimated to exhibit a CAGR of 20.31% during the forecast period.

    Leading Players in Human Microbiome Sequencing Market: Baseclear BV, Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) Genomics Co, Ltd, Charles River Laboratories International Inc., Clinical Microbiomics”

    — Insightace analysis

    NEW JERSEY, NJ, USA, Oct. 3, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — InsightAce Analytic Pvt. announces the publication of a Market Assessment Report on the “Global Human Microbiome Sequencing Market by (Product Type (Kits and Assays, Instruments and Software), Technology (Sequencing by Synthesis, Sequencing by Ligation and Other next-generation sequencing), Traditional sequencing technologies (pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing) and other sequencing technologies Application (diagnosis of diseases (gastrointestinal diseases, metabolic diseases, oncology, infectious diseases, neurological diseases and other diseases), discovery of drugs, consumer welfare, omics analysis (genome analysis, metabolome analysis, transcriptome analysis and other omics analysis) and other applications), end user (research and academic institutions, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies and other end users) – Trends, industry competition analysis, revenue and pr revisions until 2030.”

    The global human microbiome sequencing market is estimated to exhibit a CAGR of 20.31% during the forecast period.

    Request a sample: https://www.insightaceanalytic.com/request-sample/1380

    The term “human microbiome” refers to the assortment of microorganisms that reside on and within the human body. Many organisms make up the human microbiome, including bacteria, bacteriophages, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. Microbial cells constitute ten times more human cells than human cells. The human body contains so many of these microorganisms that they weigh about 2-3 kg. The human microbiome sequencing market is expanding due to the increased use of microbiomes in genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, as well as developments in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. The market is growing due to the increased focus on human microbiome therapy as a new established target for therapeutic development. Additionally, the market for human microbiome sequencing is growing due to the increased use of microbiome for early detection and diagnosis of diseases and decreasing sequencing costs. The demand for human microbiome sequencing is expected to increase due to increasing collaborations, research expenditures, and the need for investigational new drugs (INDs) for the fecal microbiota. The expansion of genomic research globally is fueling the predicted growth of the human microbiome sequencing market. The market for human microbiome sequencing is booming thanks to numerous research and development efforts in genomics.

    List of Major Players of Human Microbiome Sequencing Market:
    • Baseclear B.V.
    • Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) Genomics Co., Ltd.
    • Charles River International Laboratories Inc.
    • Clinical Microbiology A/S
    • Eurofins Scientific SE
    • GENEWIZ, Inc.
    • Illumina, Inc.
    • Novogen Corporation
    • OraSure Technologies, Inc.
    • Oxford Nanopore Technologies, Inc.
    • Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc.
    • QIAGEN SA
    • Second Genome, Inc.
    • Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.
    • Viome, Inc.
    • Cosmos ID
    • Leucine Rich Bio Pvt. ltd.
    • Microbe
    • Microbiome Insights Inc.
    • Molzym GmbH & Co. KG

    Market dynamics:
    Drivers-
    The human intestinal flora significantly improves the effectiveness of pharmaceuticals. Studies have shown that the right microbial balance in the human body helps in treating various diseases. This link between particular disease states and bacteria may present new insights for drug development (or vaccine makers). Microbes are abundant suppliers of enzymes, which makes them useful for various therapeutic purposes, including the search for innovative treatments. With several small, innovative players operating in the market, there are many high-growth opportunities for critical stakeholders to acquire companies so that microbiomes can be studied in hopes of discovering new drugs and drug targets for a variety of indications including obesity, liver disorders, diabetes and metabolic disorders. Strategic alliances and collaborations are a top priority for many market leaders as they strive to expand their product pipelines through effective research and development methods.

    Challenges:
    Probiotics have not received FDA approval as a live biotherapeutic product (a biological product, other than a vaccine, that includes living organisms and is used to treat or prevent human disease.). Foods containing FDA-regulated probiotics, including dietary supplements, are nonetheless marketed legally even though they cannot be used to treat, prevent, or alleviate disease. The FDA is considering changing its description of probiotics. There may be a distinct or entirely new set of regulatory hurdles for genetically modified microorganisms. Additionally, parallel control groups of healthy individuals must be compared for the present methods of identifying microbial indicators for diagnostic purposes to be effective. It can be difficult to determine which microbe is best suited for a certain application, making it difficult to choose the appropriate microbial chassis for microbiota-based therapy.

    Regional trends:
    North America currently holds a dominant position in the human microbiome sequencing market owing to the region’s robust healthcare infrastructure, increasing investments by large companies in the development of cutting-edge devices, drug development and research activities. The dominance of the region is also tied to improvements in next-generation sequencing and the growing prevalence of lifestyle issues. For example, a leading US company, Illumina Inc., claims that the development of next-generation sequencing has made several high-level collaborative projects possible, such as the Human Microbiome Project and MetaHIT. These initiatives have used next-generation sequencing as the main instrument to publish a wide range of data on the human microbiome. Asia-Pacific is expected to grow over the projection period as more institutions open up in related sectors and the microbiome. Rising prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases, increased awareness of preventive health care, funding for microbiome research, and growing number of microbiome research and clinical activities are propelling the growth of the regional market.

    Key developments: https://www.insightaceanalytic.com/enquiry-before-buying/1380

    RECENT DEVELOPMENTS:
    • In September 2021, PhenoBiome announced that its first human gut microbiome test would be available through Genetic Direction, a Dallas-based distributor of genetics-based health management solutions. Clinical Enterprise, Inc., a subsidiary of Eurofins Scientific, will perform the testing in its CLIA and CAP certified laboratory.
    • In July 2021, Seres Therapeutics Inc. and Nestlé Health Science agreed to collaborate on the commercialization of SER-109, an investigational oral microbiome treatment for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), in the United States (US). -U.) and Canada. If approved, SER-109 will be the first FDA-approved microbiome treatment.

    Human Microbiome Sequencing Market Segmentation-
    By product type
    • Kits and assays
    • Instruments
    • Software
    By technology
    • Next Generation Sequencing
    o Sequencing by synthesis
    o Sequencing by Ligature
    o Other next-generation sequencing technologies
    • Traditional sequencing technologies
    o Pyrosequencing
    o Sanger sequencing
    • Other sequencing technology
    By app
    • Diagnoses of diseases
    o Gastrointestinal diseases
    o Metabolic diseases
    o Oncology
    o Infectious diseases
    o Neurological diseases
    o Other illnesses
    • Drug discovery
    • Consumer well-being
    • Omic analysis
    o Genome analysis
    o Metabolome analysis
    o Transcriptome analysis
    o Other omics analyzes
    • Other app
    Per end user
    • Research and academic institutions
    • Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies
    • Other end users
    By region-
    • North America-
    o United States
    o Canada
    o Mexico
    • Europe-
    o Germany
    o United Kingdom
    o France
    o Italy
    o Spain
    o Rest of Europe
    • Asia Pacific-
    o China
    o Japan
    o India
    o South Korea
    o Southeast Asia
    o Rest of Asia-Pacific
    • Latin America-
    o Brazil
    o Argentina
    o Rest of Latin America
    • Middle East and Africa-
    o GCC countries
    o South Africa
    o Rest of the Middle East and Africa

    For information: https://www.insightaceanalytic.com/customisation/1380

    Priyanka Tilekar
    Insightace Analytical Pvt. ltd.
    +1 551-226-6109
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    Discovery of new pathway offers potential solution to prevent cancer chemoresistance https://fcacleveland.org/discovery-of-new-pathway-offers-potential-solution-to-prevent-cancer-chemoresistance/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 02:50:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/discovery-of-new-pathway-offers-potential-solution-to-prevent-cancer-chemoresistance/ Researchers have discovered a new pathway that explains how cancer cells become resistant to chemotherapies, which in turn offers a potential solution to preventing drug resistance. Experimental DNA fibers with fluorescence (pictured) were used to reveal the speed of DNA replication forks. The research describes for the first time how a type of enzyme – […]]]>

    Researchers have discovered a new pathway that explains how cancer cells become resistant to chemotherapies, which in turn offers a potential solution to preventing drug resistance.

    Experimental DNA fibers with fluorescence (pictured) were used to reveal the speed of DNA replication forks.

    The research describes for the first time how a type of enzyme – previously known for its role in DNA repair – prevents DNA damage in cancer cells, making them tolerant to chemotherapy drugs.

    “It provides us with tools to manipulate and then break down chemoresistance in cancer cells,” said Marcus Smolka, acting director of the Weill Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology and professor of molecular biology and genetics at the College of agriculture and life sciences.

    Diego Dibitetto, a former postdoctoral researcher in Smolka’s lab who is currently at the University of Bern in Switzerland, is the paper’s first author.

    Many cancer drugs work by creating blocks in the DNA of cancer cells as they replicate. During replication, the DNA strands entwined in a double helix separate into two individual strands so that each strand can be copied, ultimately leading to two new double helices. The junction where this splitting and copying occurs is called a replication fork, which unzips the double helix.

    If these replication forks were cars on a road, chemotherapy drugs can be imagined as roadblocks that interfere with the traffic of cars, thereby stopping replication and breaking DNA. But cancer cells have a way of slowing down these forks, which allows them to avoid such collisions and protect their DNA, leading to drug tolerance.

    This study reports, for the first time, how a kinase (enzyme) called DNA-PKcs acts as a sensor when a fork is stressed due to blockages, and promotes fork slowing and chemoresistance.

    DNA-PKcs is known for its role in DNA repair related to immune system antibody generation and radiation resistance. But this is the first time the kinase has been linked to slowing down a replication fork, a process called fork inversion.

    It’s a whole new way of thinking about the action of this kinase. It’s not about repairing the DNA in this case; it slows down the forks to prevent breaks from happening in the first place.”


    Marcus Smolka, acting director of the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology and professor of molecular biology and genetics at the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    The results open the door to new cancer treatments, as DNA-PKcs inhibitors already exist and are being used for clinical trials alongside radiotherapy. In these treatments, radiation damages the DNA of cancer cells, and it was thought that inhibiting DNA-PKcs would limit cell repair. But DNA-PKcs inhibitors don’t work well in this setting because cancer cells have other ways to repair themselves.

    This study provides early evidence that a DNA-PKcs inhibitor could be effective in combination with chemotherapies, where the chemotherapy drugs would create blocks to DNA replication, and the inhibitor would prevent forks from slowing down replication that leads to drug resistance.

    In the study, the researchers used an assay to detect DNA-PKcs kinase at replication forks. Then they used a DNA fiber test with fluorescent colors, so the faster the replication forks moved, the longer the fibers became. In the presence of chemotherapy drugs, the fibers were short, indicating slowed replication forks. But when inhibitors were added, the fibers remained longer, indicating that the forks were moving at faster speeds.

    Co-author Massimo Lopes, an expert in replication stress at the University of Zurich, took images that confirmed that replication forks no longer reversed and slowed down in the presence of the kinase inhibitors. The team also proved that cancer cells became diseased or degraded when chemotherapy and inhibitors were applied together.

    Finally, BRCA2-deficient breast cancers can become resistant to the chemotherapy drugs used to treat them, and fork inversion was known to be implicated in resistance. In this study, when researchers applied DNA-PKcs inhibitors to BRCA2-deficient breast cancer cells that were resistant to treatment, the cells regained sensitivity to treatment.

    “This is another way to confirm that the ability to prevent fork-slowing and reversal with DNA-PKcs inhibitors appears to be a very good way to manipulate chemoresistance,” Smolka said. .

    In future work, the research team will study how cells sense stress from replication forks and which proteins DNA-PKc interacts with to slow down these forks.

    Sven Rottenberg, a cancer therapy resistance researcher at the University of Bern, is co-author.

    The study was funded by the Fleming Research Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Swiss National Science Foundation, the European Union and the Wilhelm Sander Foundation.

    Source:

    Journal reference:

    Dibitetto, D. et al. (2022) DNA-PKcs promotes fork inversion and chemoresistance. Molecular cell. doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2022.08.028.

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