Word editor – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 18:32:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Word editor – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 Title IX, 50 years later: The 37 words that changed our world of sport https://fcacleveland.org/title-ix-50-years-later-the-37-words-that-changed-our-world-of-sport/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 17:52:10 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/title-ix-50-years-later-the-37-words-that-changed-our-world-of-sport/ Let’s go back 50 years to 1972. Title IX became the law of the land just weeks earlier. To paraphrase Bob Dylan: Times were changing. I was a young sportswriter at American Hattiesburg, going to college. My editor told me to go and report on a college seminar. The federal government — the Department of […]]]>

Let’s go back 50 years to 1972. Title IX became the law of the land just weeks earlier. To paraphrase Bob Dylan: Times were changing.

I was a young sportswriter at American Hattiesburg, going to college. My editor told me to go and report on a college seminar. The federal government — the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW), in particular — was sending a representative to explain the ramifications of Title IX. I went.

Rick Cleveland

But first I had to consult the Title IX legislation. It was 37 words: “No person in the United States shall, because of their gender, be excluded from participation, denied benefits, or discriminated against in any program or an educational activity receiving federal financial assistance.”

I didn’t see the words “sports” or “athletics” anywhere in the wording. I didn’t know why I was sent to cover it. The answer came quickly.

HEW’s wife didn’t mince words. She said all public schools — from elementary schools to universities that received federal funding — should spend money equally on boys and girls and men and women — in athletics, as in all others. aspects of education. And if they didn’t, they would lose all federal funds.

Hands went up. People had questions. One of the first: how are universities like USM, Mississippi State and Ole Miss, which are already struggling to make ends meet, supposed to double their spending on scholarships, salaries, expenses, etc.? as part of their sports programs?

His response: That was not the government’s concern. Otherwise they would.

At that time, I mumbled something along the lines of, “This is insane. He will never fly. It is not fair.”

The man next to me, a professor in the Department of Health and Physical Education, looked at me and said, “Obviously you never had a daughter. He had three. One became the point guard for Hattiesburg High’s first basketball team.

Fifty years, a son and a daughter later, I get it.


Last week, the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics at Ole Miss celebrated 50 years of Title IX with a panel discussion featuring Ole Miss athletic director Keith Carter, women’s basketball coach Yolette McPhee -McCuinn (better known as Coach Yo) and Rita Igbokwe, senior player for the Ole Miss women’s basketball team. I moderated. You can find it here.

If the discussion did nothing else, it surely highlighted the remarkable change in the American sports scene that those 37 words spurred. I lived it. I covered it.

In 1972, no coeducational college or university in Mississippi had a single women’s athletic team. Since then, Delta State has won six National Women’s Basketball Championships. Ole Miss won a national golf championship. Mississippi State has twice made it the NCAA women’s basketball championship. Southern Miss competed in the Women’s College World Series in softball. In track and field, Tori Bowie of USM Pisgah won the NCAA championships in track and field and later an Olympic gold medal and three world championships. Last season Coach Yo’s Ole Miss team won 23 games and made the NCAA Tournament.

More importantly, over the past 50 years, thousands and thousands of young women have participated in multiple sports and have had their education funded like never before.

In more than half a century of Mississippi sports coverage, the two most significant transformations I have witnessed: first, the widespread racial integration of sports at all levels; second, the meteoric rise of women’s athletics.

50 years ago, I think I would have predicted what happened with integration. As for what happened with women’s athletics, I had no idea.

Thirty-seven words. Surprising.







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Letter to the Editor: Blood on Our Hands Saint Lucia https://fcacleveland.org/letter-to-the-editor-blood-on-our-hands-saint-lucia/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 23:41:17 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/letter-to-the-editor-blood-on-our-hands-saint-lucia/ A few months ago I wrote a letter to the editor warning him of the need to tackle what was a developing crime problem before we ran the risk of becoming a mini-Trinity- and Tobago or Jamaica. I had said that having lived in Trinidad for many years, I had seen many similarities to how […]]]>

A few months ago I wrote a letter to the editor warning him of the need to tackle what was a developing crime problem before we ran the risk of becoming a mini-Trinity- and Tobago or Jamaica. I had said that having lived in Trinidad for many years, I had seen many similarities to how the rampant crime situation there had begun to develop and what I now see happening in Sainte -Lucy. I pleaded with the authorities to act with extreme prejudice to bring the situation under control before it spirals out of control and goes on a runaway train.

It was in March, and it is clear that my warning was not heeded by the authorities. I was horrified to have video from a surveillance camera on my WhatsApp a few days ago, and although there was no footage of the crime, we heard the roar of a submachine gun when a young man was shot down, hit by 40 bullets, then hit with two more for good measure. I swore I was in Trinidad or Jamaica or even Ukraine. My blood froze.

It now seems that almost every day someone is killed in Saint Lucia. People, we need to wake up and smell the coffee because it’s getting worse, not better!

I used to brag to my friends in Trinidad that the most important thing to me when I moved to Saint Lucia was peace of mind – now we have a higher murder rate per capita than even Trinidad and Tobago. Let it flow!

These are very serious times, and they call for drastic action. The Prime Minister seems to recognize the problem, and I applaud the step taken to impose tougher penalties for possession of firearms and so on. – But this is not enough. You can’t legislate violent crime; you have to fight it head-on. And we can’t pretend it’s just some people involved. It spreads, trust me. That’s what they did in Trinidad, until the list of “collateral damage” started to grow. Until the kid who robs you at gunpoint has a scratchy finger because he has a brand new gun and has never shot it, and a robbery becomes a murder – and any of us; our parents, our children or our siblings could be the next victim.

The authorities can’t pretend they don’t know what the situation is on the streets – because if the majority of people know, and the police and security guards don’t, then they have to find something else to do because they cannot protect us.

And let me share with you that violent crime can only thrive when those responsible for our safety are also part of the problem. They say on the street that the weapons offered for sale do not pass through a dark coast, but through our ports. Criminals boast that they have friends, relatives, or contacts who will “clean the barrel” or “empty the container” with the guns – and that’s a fact. I urge the government to impose tougher penalties for possession, but also to impose very harsh penalties on any security, customs or other officers who facilitate these crimes.

It’s when your security forces are infected that crime thrives. Please let’s focus on that now.

I will share with you that I recently learned that a major corporate partner in the communications industry is now considering ensuring the safety of its personnel, and there are even members of its management personnel who have expressed the desire to leave Saint Lucia for security reasons. That’s when you know it’s bad. Is this our dear Hélène from the West? It means the news is spreading beyond our shores, and it means that one day we might wake up and see the US State Department or the Commonwealth Travel Advisory in the UK putting our travel warnings to Sainte -Lucie because of the risks associated with violent crime. Is this what we want?

Where is the voice of the Chamber of Commerce? Where is the voice of the Hotel Association?

Crime must be our only focus right now, because rampant crime affects everything and everyone. Our young men are being targeted and inducted by the gangs, if we don’t save them we will lose a generation and their blood will be on our hands.

Joseph Parnum

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CDL’s ingenuity engine lets the mind wonder https://fcacleveland.org/cdls-ingenuity-engine-lets-the-mind-wonder/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 10:45:29 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/cdls-ingenuity-engine-lets-the-mind-wonder/ By Doug Marrin On the second floor of the Chelsea District Library is an enchanting portal to the incredible worlds of our indoor and outdoor space, a place where your imagination and creativity can let go and run, run, run. CDL’s Ingenuity Engine (IE) is for people with all kinds of interests to come and […]]]>

By Doug Marrin

On the second floor of the Chelsea District Library is an enchanting portal to the incredible worlds of our indoor and outdoor space, a place where your imagination and creativity can let go and run, run, run.

CDL’s Ingenuity Engine (IE) is for people with all kinds of interests to come and explore the vast possibilities their curiosity can open up for them. It is aimed at artisans, artists, businesses, groups and individuals. Anyone can take advantage of IE’s technology without buying their own. The room includes a 3D printer, laser cutter, Cricut and Silhouette vinyl cutters, sewing machines, and audio-video editing equipment with beginner and professional software.

“The Ingenuity Engine is a creative space where the community can come together, experiment, learn and expand their horizons,” said Matt Jensen, CDL’s technology specialist who oversees IE. “Think of it as a place to discover while doing.”

Put simply, a makerspace is a place where you, well, To do things. In education, students experience hands-on learning with a variety of tools that can include a carpentry shop, 3D printing, audio-visual equipment, engravers, computers, and hand tools. Spaces like CDL’s Ingenuity Engine are designed to empower us to create, problem solve, develop skills, talents, and think critically.

Passionate about learning, Matt Jensen is CDL’s technology specialist who oversees IE. Photo by Doug Marrin.

It may seem unusual to some that such activities end up in a library. But Jensen sees makerspaces as the evolution of how libraries have adapted to serve the public.

“The first thing a lot of people think of when they think of libraries is books,” says Jensen. “But that idea slowly changed over time. A notable change occurred at the time with microfilm and microfiche databases, compacting film information that could only be viewed with bulky equipment.

Jensen describes how the next bump in evolutionary progress came with the introduction of word processors and computers. After that, libraries started offering VHS, then DVDs and CDs. And now libraries provide access to streaming services like Hoopla, not to mention millions of ebooks and other digital resources.

The laser cutter cuts wood and acrylic and can engrave on different surfaces such as metal and glass. Photo by Burrill Strong.

“Libraries have always been where humans cultivate and store information,” he says. “There was a time when if you wanted to learn something, you had to read a book. But we know that people learn in different ways. A creative space such as the Ingenuity Engine fits this idea perfectly. »

In addition to cultivating the inner space of our creativity, this fall EI is offering an exciting space program, Skynet Junior Scholars. Skynet is a global network of robotic telescopes with telescopes in places like Chile, Australia, Canada and Italy. With a laptop, students learn to program these telescopes to explore and take pictures of the universe. Students can even go one step further and design a unique t-shirt with the image or use the laser engraver to make a woodcut.

Skynet students have access to five such telescopes in Chile and others around the world for their space exploration of things like the nebula on the right. Photos courtesy of CDL.

The Ingenuity engine has been open for a year. Most activities were by appointment. Curious people walk in and discuss their interest with Matt, from there. As the makerspace grows, it anticipates more course formats.

“We want people to let their curiosity lead them and see where it takes them,” says Matt. “If you have an idea, let’s see if we can make it happen.”

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The Verge goes back to blogging basics with a new redesign https://fcacleveland.org/the-verge-goes-back-to-blogging-basics-with-a-new-redesign/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 18:39:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/the-verge-goes-back-to-blogging-basics-with-a-new-redesign/ Tech news site The Verge launched a radically redesigned website this week. One of the first things editor Nilay Patel remember telling the designers when they started the process in 2020? “We just want to be able to tweet on our own website.” “Dieter [Bohn, former executive editor of The Verge] and I was regularly […]]]>

Tech news site The Verge launched a radically redesigned website this week. One of the first things editor Nilay Patel remember telling the designers when they started the process in 2020? “We just want to be able to tweet on our own website.”

“Dieter [Bohn, former executive editor of The Verge] and I was regularly frustrated that we weren’t on our own homepage enough. We are both busy. We run the site, we create podcasts, we were shooting videos,” Patel explained in an episode of The Vergecast. “The barrier to accessing our own homepage was a 500-word article. It was too high. We weren’t posting enough and we were going crazy – and we ended up using Twitter, which is someone else’s platform.

He added: “I look at the gigantic website that we run and I’m like, ‘Why do I find it easier to post on someone else’s platform rather than my own? “”

The Verge was founded in 2011, making the Vox-owned publication a veteran among tech news sites. The site launched with an adventurous homepage design and has had some bold redesigns in the years since, but the redesign kicked off on Tuesday “represents The Verge’s biggest reimagining since we started it all.” , Patel said.

The most consequential change isn’t the new fonts or color scheme (along with “Blurple”, “Pernod”, and “Hot Brick”), but the transformation of The Verge’s homepage into something the site calls it the Storystream. Vox Media has toyed with the phrase StoryStream – and the idea of ​​giving its journalists an outlet to post short-form content – in the past, but that’s usually meant bundling similar stories together from its own content. This Storystream brings together Verge’s full articles with original reporting, tweets, external links (to press releases and other news outlets), YouTube links, quick voiceovers, TikToks and more in one newsfeed.

Six years ago, The Verge revamped the site to create distinctive design elements — think: neon-pink quotes and “laser lines” in videos — so content on the site would be recognizable even “when the media swoops in.” are separated into individually distributed article pages by social media and search algorithms,” Patel wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.

“But,” Patel continued, “posting on other people’s platforms can only get you so far. And the longer we lived with that decision, the more strongly we felt that our own should be an antidote to algorithmic newsfeeds, an editorial product created by real people with intent and expertise.

The new site looks a lot more like Twitter than a front page. And that’s kinda the goal. Patel said The Verge’s competitor was not Wired or The New York Times, but Twitter “and other audience aggregators.” While other news outlets are shifting their resources to building communities where readers already spend a lot of time – YouTube, Reddit, TikTok, Instagram, Discord, etc. – The Verge also wanted to make sure it was investing closer to home. Ultimately, the “great hope” is that The Verge’s homepage looks like “a better, cooler and more fun feed than social media feeds.”

The redesign was designed for mobile first — 90% of The Verge audience visits on their phones – and the team acknowledged that the desktop version is something of an afterthought. With the addition of several widgets, the reading experience can be a bit chaotic and some are examination the accessibility of the new site. Others really hate white-on-black text, which many people find difficult to read.

The idea, however, is to bring together the biggest and most interesting tech news — including the many conversations, reports, and tidbits found elsewhere on the internet — in one place. As Patel explained in the post:

Our plan is to bring the best of old-school blogging to a modern newsfeed experience and have our seasoned editors and reporters constantly update the site with the best of technology and science news from around the world. the whole internet. If that means logging on to Wired or Bloomberg or another news source, that’s great – we’re happy to send people to do great work elsewhere, and we hope our feed is useful enough to keep you coming back. later. If that means we just need to embed the viral tweet from TikTok or the wacky CEO and move on, so be it – we can do that. We can embed anything, actually: I’m especially excited that we can direct people directly to interesting threads on Reddit and other forums.

The Storystream also appears at the end of article pages, although it’s unclear how often readers will come to this. (After the text of the article, readers are faced with a big ad, a link to the comments section, a “featured video” ad, a related links section, another big ad, a sponsored content banner and then the Storystream.) Overall, the redesign is a major investment in The Verge’s homepage, already Vox Media’s most popular page, the publisher said. Helene Havlak.

“With the new site, we are making a big bet that we can grow our direct and loyal audience by curating the best technology and science destination on the web,” Havlak said. She also told Axios, “If I can just get people to refresh our site one more time a day, that’s a huge boost for my business.”

The new format will free up editorial bandwidth by eliminating aggregation posts and debates over whether “one dude’s tweets” deserve a full story, Patel said. He estimated the changes will save the newsroom 20 hours a day and said the extra time will be redirected to publishing more original reporting and analysis.

The Verge also announced its move to the Coral commenting platform, with the aim of fostering more quality conversations on its site. (The Verge was one of several news outlets that disabled comments on some or all articles in recent years.) Under the new protocol, moderation chief Eric Berggren will oversee community contributions, although any Verge reporter can choose to “feature” an interesting story. comment.

“We also hope to highlight our top comments in Storystream’s new newsfeed on our homepage and create a positive feedback loop,” added editor Havlak.

In the Vergecast episode, Patel also revealed a somewhat unusual goal for a news agency: the amount of traffic it can send to other electrical outlets. He said he thinks The Verge can “very quickly” send more traffic to publishers than Twitter, for example.

“One of my biggest goals – the big numbers I look at – is the amount of traffic we send. I think we’ll be hugely successful if we send a significant amount of traffic to other people,” he said. Patel said “Because this relationship between publishers and platforms has gone totally out of whack.”

“If we can just get back into the game where we’re like, hey, you can create your own communities, on your own platforms, again, in a format that both feels very modern – because it’s a thread news – but inherits the best parts of what people liked on the blogs, and you’re a good internet citizen because you share the wealth,” Patel added, “I think it lets you reset this whole relationship and then potentially building whatever the next things are, not constantly rushing against updating the algorithm, regardless of which platform is going to deploy higher or lower ranked content.

(Some of you will want to listen to the second half of the episode, where the editor David Pierce dives into the details of the site redesign with Senior Product Manager Tara Kalmanson and Senior Engineer Matt Crider. They explain why TikTok’s integrations are so terrible and how they’ve balanced speed, content and design in the redesign.)

The Verge said the typical number of visitors to its homepage doubled the day the redesign began. Here’s what some of those visitors thought:

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How not to polarize voters – The Durango Herald https://fcacleveland.org/how-not-to-polarize-voters-the-durango-herald/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 10:45:50 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/how-not-to-polarize-voters-the-durango-herald/ The Denver Post The editorial board made a bold move by asking four independent columnists to take a break from writing between the primary and general elections. The board will instead focus on insider opinions to “bring depth and understanding to complex issues,” said Megan Schrader, editor-in-chief of the post office editorial pages, said in […]]]>

The Denver Post The editorial board made a bold move by asking four independent columnists to take a break from writing between the primary and general elections. The board will instead focus on insider opinions to “bring depth and understanding to complex issues,” said Megan Schrader, editor-in-chief of the post office editorial pages, said in a note to readers in June.

In an email to The Herald of Durango, Schrader explained his decision. “Fairness during campaign season is something opinion writers struggle with every year, and it’s something I really started to consider when Denver Post Columnist Ian Silverii’s wife has announced she is running for Congress,’ she said. “This obvious conflict for a columnist prompted me to consider other less obvious conflicts that other columnists might have.

“I find it hard to know whether opinion columnists, myself included, are doing America a disservice when we engage on polarizing issues and fail to bring nuance and depth to our analysis. . There’s a rich history in America of opinion journalists using sharp points in their language to get their point across, and I certainly haven’t done it sometimes, but at this point we could all defend a little more politics in our daily lives. diet and a little less partisanship.

The post office decision makes sense. We all have biases and, at times, slight underlying conflicts. It’s golden when opinion pages welcome columnists with strong points of view who have something to say. A variety of voices brings dynamism and, ideally, balance. Yet the result may be the opposite of what we want to achieve. It’s a stinging irony – when a column is more polarizing than uplifting discourse.

We appreciate Schrader’s “nuance and depth,” which requires refined skill. It’s easier for an opinion writer to swing wildly and loudly. Election season gives the green light to sharpen the knives and score the hard lines. Some columnists leave no compromise for a seemingly small and subtle stance that might open a door for readers to feel welcome enough to step in.

A fine line exists, a distinction when the conversation swings from peeling the layers of an issue to supporting the political party we want in power. Sometimes it’s blatant with a request for a vote. Other times it’s in challengers talking trash. It might be barely noticeable, except for one word, which contains multitudes. It is then that the gap widens. And that’s not what we’re looking for.

What we want is to understand the actions, stories and relationships of the candidates, more than the promises and the potential. For our election coverage, candidates from major races were asked to speak their truths directly to readers in guest columns. Their words will appear here on 1B throughout the election season. And Wes Rowell, our versatile editorial designer, will illustrate the portraits of each candidate.

Readers, we look forward to your letters. The guest columnists will also intervene. And, you bet, we’ll approve the candidates.

Schrader said she liked the post office the opinion columns of John Brackney “whose purpose in life is to reunite America even as we are deeply at odds over politics”. In one on engaging with others, Brackney wrote that citizens “have matured to understand that not every fight has to be fought every day.”

Wise words, especially at election time.

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Queen Elizabeth II was loved. The monarchy is not. What does this mean for King Charles III? – Grid News https://fcacleveland.org/queen-elizabeth-ii-was-loved-the-monarchy-is-not-what-does-this-mean-for-king-charles-iii-grid-news/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 23:11:09 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/queen-elizabeth-ii-was-loved-the-monarchy-is-not-what-does-this-mean-for-king-charles-iii-grid-news/ The other day, during a conversation about Britain’s economic crisis and new British Prime Minister Liz Truss, the subject of Queen Elizabeth came up – in the form of a sensitive question about her age and fragile health. In a sense, the question was a left turn, given that it was a discussion of the […]]]>

The other day, during a conversation about Britain’s economic crisis and new British Prime Minister Liz Truss, the subject of Queen Elizabeth came up – in the form of a sensitive question about her age and fragile health. In a sense, the question was a left turn, given that it was a discussion of the Europe-wide energy crisis, inflation in the UK and various policy prescriptions to deal with these problems. British monarchs are notoriously agnostic – at least publicly – when it comes to policy-making. But the question has resurfaced because for the first time in seven decades of rule, the Queen had welcomed the new Prime Minister somewhere other than Buckingham Palace (Balmoral Castle), with his health given as the reason. And that prompted the question: in the sea of ​​crises currently afflicting Britain, would the queen’s departure from the stage add to all these traumas?

The man who answered turned out to be Professor Anand Menon of King’s College London, the son of Indian immigrants to Britain and, by his own admission, hardly someone with great reverence for the monarchy. And yet Menon did not hesitate in his response.

“This feels like a moment of deep fragility in the history of our country,” Menon said. “The only obvious source of continuity and stability is in the person of Queen Elizabeth. So I suspect that even for people who don’t necessarily approve of the monarchy or who don’t really care who succeeds him on the throne, there will be a degree to which his passing will be deeply troubling to the British people.

And then – as if anticipating the follow-up question, Menon added, “I’m surprised to hear myself say that, in a way. I just think, given where we are as a country, if that were to happen relatively soon, it would be troubling.

When the news came

A day later it happened. The Royal Family announced the Queen’s death just 24 hours after Menon uttered those words. Just two days after Liz Truss bowed in the presence of the Queen at Balmoral Castle. And nearly 26,000 days after Queen Elizabeth’s accession to the throne in 1952.

To use Menon’s word, the news will almost certainly be “troubling”, and not just because of the current crises rocking the British Isles.

In some ways, that doesn’t make sense. The idea of ​​monarchs and monarchies seems quaint and dated and almost absurd in the third decade of the 21st century; respect for the monarchy may seem doubly true. Yes, Britain is a society renowned for its class consciousness, but anyone who has spent time in England knows that there is also a rambling and brash quality to the culture and way of life that seems totally at odds with pageantry, wealth and trappings of royalty. . And the royal family itself has been battered by unpleasant drama over the years – Charles and Diana, Charles and Camilla, Prince Andrew and Jeffrey Epstein – we’ll spare readers the full list, but suffice it to say that the family Royal has kept tabloids in business for decades.

Besides the royal scandal, there were reams of newsprint and even a feature film (“The Queen”) devoted to the Queen’s inability to grasp the moment following the death of Princess Diana in 1997 and to connect more intimately with his subjects. And anyone who’s watched the Netflix series “The Crown” will have seen an ample and detailed treatment of the not-so-pretty inner workings of the royal family themselves.

Why, then, are millions of British citizens – young and old and in between – shedding tears, joining vigils and laying flowers at the gates of Buckingham Palace?

The simple answer may be that it is about the monarch, not the monarchy.

“As if Big Ben had disappeared”

On the one hand, Queen Elizabeth has been a fixture, in every sense of the word.

“It’s strange,” Louise Roberts, 19, a student at the University of Essex, told Grid on Thursday. “She’s always been there, you know, and now I don’t know how to think she’s not there.” It’s not because I want a royal family there, but it was there before I was even born. Maybe even before my parents were born.

“It’s almost as if Big Ben has disappeared,” Grid deputy editor Nikhil Kumar said, speaking from London on Thursday. “His passing almost feels like a national monument has been taken down.”

If that sounds like hyperbole, consider how long that particular “benchmark” has been in place. As a princess, Elizabeth walked the streets of London during the German bombardment of the country. She ascended to the throne when Winston Churchill was British Prime Minister and Harry Truman was President of the United States. Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong led the Soviet Union and China. A “fixed” – as in the fact that the stamps and currency of the kingdom bear the image of the queen. “You bow down to your monarch, and yet you hold his head in your hand and use it to pay for potatoes,” The Economist reminded readers on Thursday, in a memorable sentence.

‘Fixture’ – as in, as turmoil came and went, for her country and her family alike, Queen Elizabeth II opted for steady, calm stoicism. A few words if needed. If the crisis of the moment seemed daunting, the Queen could (and often did) tell her subjects that the nation had been through worse. On the occasions she chose to address the nation – after the July 2005 terrorist attacks in London and at the start of the covid-19 pandemic, to cite just two relatively recent examples – that was her message. “We will come to the other side.” That, and a royal take on the British staple: ‘Keep calm and carry on’, the phrase that was first used on posters as war approached in 1939. The Queen had been through it all .

On the 50th, 60th and this year the 70th anniversary of his reign, crowds filled the celebrations. Yes, they may have come for entertainment – this year Alicia Keys, Diana Ross and Queen – but they also came in her honor.

The empire was gone – the number of ‘Queen’s subjects’ had dwindled – and Britain itself was in many ways a totally different place from where she had become queen. For one thing, the country is now much more diverse and multicultural — three of the top ministers in Truss’s new cabinet are people of color. But while members of these communities might not cheer for the monarchy, many will mourn the Queen.

This was the response on Thursday from Sathnam Sanghera, a 46-year-old author born to Indian parents who immigrated to the UK in 1968: “People outside of Britain might have trouble understanding the following here“, he tweeted after hearing the news. “I can’t speak for everyone, but for me it’s about the fact that in a time of divisiveness, in a time when politicians thrive on dividing us, we have lost someone who was consistent. Someone who really tried to unite.

What happens after

Polls show that more than 6 in 10 Britons support keeping the monarchy. It’s not a strong majority, and the trajectory is not good, given that polls have shown – perhaps unsurprisingly – less support among the younger generation.

One particular former member of the younger generation – Truss, the new prime minister – once proclaimed herself a skeptic of the monarchy, in remarks she no doubt wishes she had never made. In a statement made in 1994, when she was in her late teens, Truss said, “I’m personally not against any of them. I am against the idea that people can be born to rule. That people, because of the family they were born into, should be able to be the head of state of our country. I think it’s shameful.

The clip went viral during the campaign for the leadership of the British Conservative Party. Then there she is at Balmoral Castle on Tuesday, bowing to the Queen.

The queen was not only popular at home; Gallup noted on Thursday that no other woman had approached so many appearances on their annual list of the World’s Most Admired Women. Queen Elizabeth landed in the top 10 52 times between 1948 and 2020. And looking ahead, it doesn’t help that the Queen has consistently outranked her son Charles – as of Thursday, King Charles III – in the polls on the monarchy and the royal family.

A survey by Ipsos just ahead of this year’s celebrations of her 70th birthday on the throne found that when asked to name her favorite member of the royal family, Queen Elizabeth was a runaway winner. The Ipsos summary cited high marks for the Queen “as a good representative of Britain on the world stage…someone who unites people across Britain…and someone who has good judgment”. In virtually every category, Ipsos said: “She has a stronger image than other members of the royal family.” Only 14% of respondents said Charles was their favorite king.

The issue of monarch and monarchy reminded me of another much revered ruler, the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand, who occupied the throne for 70 years and 126 days, just months before Elizabeth’s historic reign. Bhumipol was adored by his subjects, his portraits hung in homes, and his birthday celebrated by members of all walks of Thai political life. His death in 2016 raised concerns about the Thai monarchy which, though rarely addressed publicly in this country, still simmers below the surface. There are of course many differences between the two nations, and the rulers in question; perhaps the common thread running through both was that the monarchs themselves were responsible for degrees of reverence.

What will all of this mean for Charles? It’s far too early to tell, other than the obvious fact that Queen Elizabeth’s reign will be an almost impossible act to follow. The Economist’s obituary on Thursday noted that ‘his death robs Britain of a thread that has woven the nation together and bound it to its past. In the hours and days ahead, the Royal Family will do what they do best and mask the uncertainty and emotion with ritual and pageantry. There will be flags at half mast; the ceremonies will take place; the bells will ring. But for now, there is unease.

Malaise – because of all these internal troubles that the country feels; because of the political upheaval; and unease, perhaps, because it’s hard to imagine the image of King Charles III on a British stamp or pound note.

For now, there will be the long days of mourning, funerals and an outpouring of tributes that might come as a surprise to many outside Britain. Some have suggested the moment could bring the country together – and perhaps even help the new king in that regard.

Meanwhile, as they reflect and look forward, those who mourn can take comfort: Big Ben is still standing.

Thanks to Alicia Benjamin for writing this article.

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Ask the Editor: A New GLOBAL Initiative https://fcacleveland.org/ask-the-editor-a-new-global-initiative/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 14:30:44 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/ask-the-editor-a-new-global-initiative/ NICK EICHER, HOST: Today is Friday, September 2. Good morning! This is The world and all in it of WORLD Radio supported by the listeners. I am Nick Eicher. MYRNA BROWN, HOST: And I’m Myrna Brown. WORLD Radio Executive Producer Paul Butler is here now with this month’s Ask the Editor. Good-morning Paul. PAUL BUTLER, […]]]>

NICK EICHER, HOST: Today is Friday, September 2. Good morning! This is The world and all in it of WORLD Radio supported by the listeners. I am Nick Eicher.

MYRNA BROWN, HOST: And I’m Myrna Brown.

WORLD Radio Executive Producer Paul Butler is here now with this month’s Ask the Editor. Good-morning Paul.

PAUL BUTLER, EDITOR: Hello!

EICHER: Paul, instead of asking you to answer a listener’s question today, we have questions! We chose the musical intro for a reason, because it’s a theme you created for one of WORLD’s latest initiatives. Tell us about the Sift radio newscast.

BUTLER: Of course, with pleasure! Listeners know that each day our program begins with a 5-6 minute newscast, usually by Kent Covington, our longtime news director and anchor. So last fall we were approached by a few Christian radio stations that knew about our newscast and they said they wanted it for their stations.

BROWN: I guess those stations have provided news coverage before, why did they want what we’re offering?

BUTLER: Unfortunately, we’ve all seen it, the news has become divisive and these radio networks have heard something unique in our coverage. They told me they believe our commitment to biblical objectivity and our Christian worldview is crucial to providing up-to-date media coverage that supports their mission of discipleship and evangelism.

Sometimes the news is controversial, but we try to cover it fairly and without stirring up the outrage you see in most news stories today.

I like how our colleague Lynde Langdon puts it – she’s our news editor – and a key person in making this project possible:

LANGDON: So much media today uses fear to attract an audience. We call it “the sky is falling” journalism. At WORLD, we want to equip our audience for discernment in the midst of all the outrage. It means keeping our listeners informed of what is happening in God’s world without proclaiming that the sky is falling, for we know who holds the sky.

EICHER: Yes. And Lynde is great at keeping the news team focused on that.

BUTLER: She is. Over the past few months, Lynde has assembled an incredible breaking news team to help us make this project a reality. Steve Kloosterman is our breaking news editor – he lives in Michigan. We currently have two full-time breaking news reporters working in Asheville, NC. They are no strangers to WORLD Radio. They were both interns and we hired them right out of college: Josh Shumacher and Mary Muncy. Besides Kent Covington, as I mentioned, a handful of our regular program hosts will anchor the newscasts throughout the day, of course our usual technical staff who set everything up throughout the day. And Nick, thank you for stepping in to help run the team the afternoon time slot.

EICHER: Well, as they say at Chick-fil-A, my pleasure! Best to say I “manage” to step up and wear many hats here at WORLD. I really love how this fits into our overall mission of delivering biblically objective journalism that informs, educates and inspires to reach a whole new audience that may not even have heard of WORLD. And we are happy to serve them.

BUTLER: Yeah, and a lot of them. We have already had over 100 stations regularly broadcasting our newscasts since the 4th of July. We created two additional morning newscasts for the Moody Radio network of stations.

But starting this month we will have an updated newsletter for every part of the day, Monday to Friday. This means new WORLD Radio news bulletin during morning commute, mid-morning update, early afternoon update, afternoon commute time and news bulletin in the evening.

BROWN: Paul, talk about this week’s preparation for launch.

BUTLER: All this week we’ve been producing six newscasts a day. We call this a “stress test” to make sure we have all the systems in place to hit our broadcast times. Monday was a little bumpy, but every day since we hit all the deadlines!

EICHER: So it’s only radio, radio broadcast only for our Sift newscasts?

BUTLER: Well, yes and no. On September 5, our newsletters will be available for download to Christian radio stations through the server provided by Moody Radio.

The Moody Radio satellite service will begin broadcasting the news on September 12, and Faith Radio Network of Minnesota’s Twin Cities will support us beginning September 19. We had a handful of independent radio stations that also said they would play it as well. Most stations broadcast newscasts at or near the end of the hour. So it’s broadcast on the radio.

But maybe you don’t have a local radio affiliate carrying us…we’re also working on making these newscasts available via smart speaker and in its own podcast feed.

And a word for you if you work in radio: If you’d like your local radio station to air Sift’s newscast, we’ve included some additional information in today’s transcript. We’re offering these newsletters to stations free of charge – we’re just asking them to make an effort to let their listeners know about our daily digital version of the Sift – available daily via email.

BROWN: That’s great news, Paul. I’m glad we had the chance to “ask the editor”. Thanks!

BUTLER: Yeah, you bet!


For more information about broadcasting The Sift Radio Newscast on your local radio station, call or email Moody Radio Network Development: 1-800-621-7031 / [email protected] / [email protected]


WORLD Radio transcriptions are created on very short notice. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative recording of WORLD Radio programming is the audio recording.

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Moderna gets Swiss booster OK; Bivalent shots expect US EUA without full human data – report – Endpoints News https://fcacleveland.org/moderna-gets-swiss-booster-ok-bivalent-shots-expect-us-eua-without-full-human-data-report-endpoints-news/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 17:36:26 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/moderna-gets-swiss-booster-ok-bivalent-shots-expect-us-eua-without-full-human-data-report-endpoints-news/ After Moderna’s bivalent Omicron booster was first licensed in the UK, it was only a matter of time before other countries followed suit. We now know the next country to sign: Switzerland. Moderna announced on Monday that regulatory agency Swissmedic has temporarily approved the mRNA behemoth’s bivalent booster vaccine, mRNA-1273.214. According to a press release, […]]]>

After Moderna’s bivalent Omicron booster was first licensed in the UK, it was only a matter of time before other countries followed suit. We now know the next country to sign: Switzerland.

Moderna announced on Monday that regulatory agency Swissmedic has temporarily approved the mRNA behemoth’s bivalent booster vaccine, mRNA-1273.214.

According to a press release, the booster is only allowed for adults. Half of the 50 mcg vaccine targets the original viral strain, while the other half targets Omicron BA.1.

Swissmedic’s decision was based on clinical trial data from a phase II/III trial that were read in June, where the candidate met all primary endpoints, including a superior antibody response against Omicron, compared to baseline in participants without antibodies.

The biotech already got clearance in the UK two weeks ago and decisions are still pending in other countries, such as Australia and Canada.

Moderna added that it was working with the Swiss government and Swissmedic to have the booster available in the country by next month.

Omicron boosters should be cleared by the FDA before the end of human trials

According to a report from the wall street journal released over the weekend.

The report notes that the FDA plans to review snapshots from various other sources outside of clinical data, such as preclinical mouse data, original vaccine profiles, and performance of previous iterations of boosters.

“Real-world evidence from current mRNA Covid-19 vaccines, which have been given to millions of individuals, shows us that the vaccines are safe,” FDA Commissioner Rob Califf said in a series of briefings. tweets last week. The FDA chief also noted that strain changes can be made safely and the regulatory agency will not hold adcomms to review new submissions.

It also aligns with biotech and pharma expectations, after Moderna just finished submitting a bivalent Omicron candidate to the FDA last week. The booster, targeting BA.4 and BA.5 as well as the original strain and called mRNA-12.73.222, is currently in an ongoing Phase II/III trial. Pfizer and BioNTech also submitted theirs last week to the FDA for EUA.

If the FDA gives these two the green light, the United States will be ready for a fall vaccination campaign.

Valneva delivers new positive Phase III data for adjuvanted Covid-19 vaccine

Valneva previously announced a positive Phase III reading for its adjuvanted Covid-19 vaccine candidate, VLA2001. Now he has more to share.

The biotech announced in a statement on Monday that additional readings from Valneva’s phase III trial showed “persistent immunogenicity and the first positive heterologous booster results after the primary vaccination.” This primary vaccination was with AstraZeneca’s ChAdOx1-S vaccine, also known as Covishield.

It is one of the most recent developments for Valneva after its contract with Europe for 60 million doses collapsed, settling for just 1.25 million doses after regulatory review stalled. of the society. The biotech had also hit back after a study late last year – touting some of its own recall data after a study published in the Lancet said VLA2001 was the only one of 7 different vaccines that didn’t work well as a booster for a Pfizer or Moderna vaccine.

According to a statement, Valneva’s vaccine-induced neutralizing antibody titers were non-inferior to Covishield at day 71, including a similar level of Covid-19 cases between the two vaccine candidates.

The biotech noted that the vaccine was able to boost immunity to levels deemed effective against SARS-CoV-2 – around 90%. In addition to this, a booster injection of VLA2001 was well tolerated in patients who previously had VLA2001 or AstraZeneca’s Covishield.

Valneva CMO Juan Carlos Jaramillo said in a statement that “we believe the robustness of the immunogenicity and safety profile of our differentiated whole virus inactivated vaccine remains compelling,” and the company looks forward to provide additional data.

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Music and Word: The Music of Faith and Hope https://fcacleveland.org/music-and-word-the-music-of-faith-and-hope/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/music-and-word-the-music-of-faith-and-hope/ Editor’s Note: “The Spoken Word” is shared by Lloyd Newell each Sunday on the Tabernacle Choir’s weekly show in Temple Square. This will be given on Sunday August 28 with Jon Schmidt and Steven Sharp Nelson of the Piano Guys. Over ten years ago, friends got together to make music. They called it “an experiment […]]]>

Editor’s Note: “The Spoken Word” is shared by Lloyd Newell each Sunday on the Tabernacle Choir’s weekly show in Temple Square. This will be given on Sunday August 28 with Jon Schmidt and Steven Sharp Nelson of the Piano Guys.

Over ten years ago, friends got together to make music. They called it “an experiment in a new way of visually producing music”. (See Steven Sharp Nelson, in Esther Basha, “The Piano Guys — from YouTube to World Tour,” Piano Performer Magazine, June 22, 2018, magazine.pianoperformers.org.)

It started small but has now grown unexpectedly as these friends have performed together around the world, and their YouTube videos have over two billion views and millions of subscribers. These friends are known as the Piano Guys, and their music, also unexpectedly, blends modern and classical music in what could be described as a beautiful conversation between a piano and a cello.

Steven Sharp Nelson: During the first video shoots, we had no idea what we were doing. It was like lights, a camera, act like you know what you’re doing. But it is the miracle of finding yourself in the work that God asks you to do. We have learned that he can do so much more than us.

Lloyd D. Newell: But these friends want to do more than entertain and have fun. They want to help people, inspire them and encourage them.

Jon Schmidt: We read these comments coming in and people say the music comforts them or inspires them or gives them hope. And then you think, ‘What does God want us to do with this?’ And that takes on an aspect of appeal.

Lloyd D. Newell: It is not so different, in fact, from the mission of the Tabernacle Choir. The styles may be somewhat different, but the inspiration—the “spiritual call”—is the same: a desire to bless and uplift people with the power of beautiful music.

Jon Schmidt: We pray before our shows, we pray before we write, we pray when we encounter problems. And we just pray that God might use us and might work through our talents. And it’s the best feeling to feel that prayer is answered.

Lloyd D. Newell: Composer Oscar Hammerstein once said, “It is a modern tragedy that despair has so many spokespersons, and hope [has] so little” (In Edward R. Murrow’s “This I Believe” radio program, Jan. 1, 1951, prx.org). The Piano Guys want to be spokespersons for hope.

Steven Sharp Nelson: Hope is powerful. Sometimes I doubted myself so much that nothing could help me except the power of Him who descended below all things to lift us up. Jesus is my hope. I hope this is the feeling people get the most when they listen to or watch the music He has given us.

Tuning in…

“Music & the Spoken Word” is available on KSL-TV, KSL Radio 1160AM/102.7FM, KSL.com, BYUtv, BYUradio, Dish and DirectTV, SiriusXM Radio (Ch. 143), le tabernaclechoir.org, youtube . com/TheTabernacleChoir and Amazon Alexa (must enable skill). The program is broadcast live on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. on several of these outlets. See airing information by state and city at musicandthespokenword.com/viewers-listeners/airing-schedules.

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Writing competition – make your voice heard https://fcacleveland.org/writing-competition-make-your-voice-heard/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 19:59:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/writing-competition-make-your-voice-heard/ The Forest Park Arts Alliance (FPAA) and the Forest Park Public Library (FPPL) are sponsoring a writing contest called “Use Your Voice” to encourage Forest Parkers to express themselves through writing and to celebrate Banned Books Week 2022. The theme of the competition is: “What does your freedom as a reader mean to you?” Submissions […]]]>

The Forest Park Arts Alliance (FPAA) and the Forest Park Public Library (FPPL) are sponsoring a writing contest called “Use Your Voice” to encourage Forest Parkers to express themselves through writing and to celebrate Banned Books Week 2022.

The theme of the competition is: “What does your freedom as a reader mean to you?” Submissions must be less than 500 words. “Tell us about your favorite book or author,” say event organizers, “and how they changed you. Maybe you want to imagine your favorite book and what it would be like if that book didn’t exist.

Although Banned Book Week takes place at the end of September, Use Your Voice events will be scheduled throughout the month.

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