Word editor – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 22:10:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Word editor – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 Kansas City-area family sues schools after being harassed https://fcacleveland.org/kansas-city-area-family-sues-schools-after-being-harassed/ Mon, 16 May 2022 21:20:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/kansas-city-area-family-sues-schools-after-being-harassed/ Kearney High School Google Maps Editor’s Note: This story contains graphic and offensive language. As a freshman at Kearney High School, a black student was told by a white classmate that she would make “all the white people in Kearney beat your ass.” When a teacher overheard the conversation, the black student was sent to […]]]>

Kearney High School

Kearney High School

Google Maps

Editor’s Note: This story contains graphic and offensive language.

As a freshman at Kearney High School, a black student was told by a white classmate that she would make “all the white people in Kearney beat your ass.”

When a teacher overheard the conversation, the black student was sent to the principal’s office. There, the principal told him to ignore the white student’s conduct because she was poorer than him, according to a lawsuit filed against the district in Clay County Circuit Court this month.

It was just one of a series of incidents where the student was racially targeted and harassed while enrolled in school, according to the lawsuit. The student’s family claims administrators were aware of the discrimination and failed to take steps to effectively protect the student and “tacitly condoned and tolerated racial harassment”.

The lawsuit says the student was routinely subjected to white classmates hurling racial slurs at him, making monkey noises and sending threatening messages.

In 2019, two white male high school students sent her pictures of themselves posing with a Confederate flag during class time, with a message that read, “Heritage but mostly hate brotha…” The student’s mother reported the incident to the administration, according to the suit.

The student received further threatening messages which read: ‘I hope I see your black ass in the tree. Alabama wind chime style” and “I hope you and your family of monkeys get hopped by all the white people in Kearney.”

Unable to bear the continual harassment, the family kicked the student out of school. The student is only referred to by his initials in court documents because he is a minor.

“This family wants justice, and they want the schools in Kearney to be as good as possible. And that means rooting out racism,” family attorney Dan Curry said in an email to The Star. “Applicant transferred to another district and prospered and graduated. But no child should have to experience sustained racial harassment at school, and it affected my client immediately and viscerally.

Kearney School District officials declined to comment on ongoing litigation.

“The district will respond appropriately within the justice system,” officials said in a statement. “KSD is fully committed to ensuring that every student can learn in an environment free from discrimination in any form.”

The Kearney School District’s student population is 91.5% white; only about 1% of students are black, according to the state education department. And it’s not the first time in the past year that a black family has fled the district, alleging discrimination.

Last fall, the U.S. Department of Education’s Civil Rights Office launched an investigation into the district after a parent filed a lawsuit saying she pulled her children from Kearney schools due to bullying. racial.

The complaint filed in court this month relates to harassment suffered by a student who attended Kearney High School during the 2018-19 and 2019-20 school years.

In first year, the student competed on the swim team, but was told by white swimmers that he had to shave his hair and dye it blond, according to the costume. Fellow swimmers bullied him for his race and told him, “Swim nigger swim,” during a competition. His sister reported the conduct to the coach.

Later, a white high school student took a photo of the black student and superimposed the words “(F***n*****s)” on it. The lawsuit says the incident was reported to school administrators.

After the incident with the Confederate flag photos, the petition says the black student began receiving threatening messages on social media from an anonymous account. The posts included racial slurs and one read: ‘THIS IS A WHITE CITY BOY (N****)’. The family claims to have reported the harassment to a counselor and high school principal, but were told to contact the police.

In another incident, the lawsuit says a white student was playing music with the N-word and began repeating the insult. The black student asked him to stop, and the white student then started making monkey noises.

Throughout the school day, several other white students joined in the noises. The petition claims that this was also brought to the attention of the administrators.

In September 2019, a white student who had previously harassed the black student circulated a video in which she and another white student chanted the N-word and indicated that the slurs were in response to the black student’s disapproval. with respect to this word.

According to the lawsuit, the black student told his parents he believed white students were trying to incite violence against him. The following day, several white students allegedly got into a physical altercation with the black student’s friend, who is also African American.

He then began to receive more threatening anonymous messages. And his parents quickly took him out of school.

The petition states that the student’s sister was also racially harassed in the district. In middle school, for example, the sister was called the N-word in class. She reported the conduct to a teacher and principal. The administration allegedly told him that it would be dealt with at a later date because the accused student had a football game and his father was a coach.

The sister was also the target of racial slurs during other incidents in middle school and high school, the lawsuit says.

The lawsuit claims the district violated Missouri human rights law and deprived the student of full and equal use and enjoyment of the school and its services. He states that he was also deprived of a safe learning environment and suffered the emotional distress and financial cost of leaving school.

The Star’s Bill Lukitsch contributed to this report.

This story was originally published May 16, 2022 4:20 p.m.

Kansas City Star Related Stories

Sarah Ritter covers K-12 education for The Kansas City Star. A former Quad-City Times reporter, Sarah is a graduate of Augustana College.

]]>
Your words carry weight, Dr. James | Letters to the Editor https://fcacleveland.org/your-words-carry-weight-dr-james-letters-to-the-editor/ Sun, 15 May 2022 01:15:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/your-words-carry-weight-dr-james-letters-to-the-editor/ In his May Day column, Dr. Winford James wondered how an Indian parent could name a child Hardik, Dikshit or Harshit. Several readers wondered how this linguist could assess Hindi names based on their resemblance to English words. Dr James responded with an “apology to the Hindu community”, in his May 8 Guardian column, confusing […]]]>

In his May Day column, Dr. Winford James wondered how an Indian parent could name a child Hardik, Dikshit or Harshit.

Several readers wondered how this linguist could assess Hindi names based on their resemblance to English words. Dr James responded with an “apology to the Hindu community”, in his May 8 Guardian column, confusing the Hindu religion with the Hindi language.

However, even his apology to the Hindu community was totally misplaced because his clever ridicule of Hindi names did not just offend Hindus but all citizens of Trinidad and Tobago who believe in the importance of this line in our anthem national, “Here every creed and race find an equal place”.

In his apology, Dr James noted the “anger and pain” expressed in some of the criticisms of his analysis. Does he condemn these messengers?

I was one of those who reacted and instead of being angry and hurt, I was very disappointed that a linguistics professor and columnist from UWI (University of the West Indies) could indulge in such a reckless and public parody of Hindi names.

Additionally, despite being an apology, Dr James defended his column by saying his article was based on “vague assumptions”.

His vague assumption was that the British colonizers created and imposed these names on the Indians. But Dr. James must know that these names date back centuries before the English language was developed.

The very term “loose assumptions” suggests that Dr. James based his article on assumptions, assumptions or suppositions, in order to flatter the few in society whose minds linger in ancient times when it was normal to ridicule foreigners, minority groups and the physically infirm.

It is to our credit as a nation that we have largely abandoned these vile provisions.

Dr. James needs to realize that as a columnist his words carry weight, especially among less critical thinkers, and he should exercise more responsibility in what he writes. He has no right to expose his readers to vague hypotheses.

David Subran

Chaguanas

]]>
Kathy Barnette’s star rises in Pennsylvania Senate race https://fcacleveland.org/kathy-barnettes-star-rises-in-pennsylvania-senate-race/ Fri, 13 May 2022 09:00:37 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/kathy-barnettes-star-rises-in-pennsylvania-senate-race/ SOUTHAMPTON, Pa. — Kathy Barnette’s opposition to abortion couldn’t be more personal. Her mother was raped and gave birth to her when she was 12 years old. “It was not a choice. It was a life. My life”, an emotional campaign video departures. Ms Barnette – a far-right conservative locked in a seven-way Republican primary […]]]>

SOUTHAMPTON, Pa. — Kathy Barnette’s opposition to abortion couldn’t be more personal.

Her mother was raped and gave birth to her when she was 12 years old. “It was not a choice. It was a life. My life”, an emotional campaign video departures.

Ms Barnette – a far-right conservative locked in a seven-way Republican primary for an open seat in the Pennsylvania Senate – is suddenly surging in the polls, statistically tied for first place with two ultra-wealthy men. And one of them has the only thing more valuable than money or name recognition in a GOP primary: an endorsement from Trump.

As Tuesday’s election nears, Ms Barnette, 50, a black mother of two who has never held office and whose life story has moved many white anti-abortion conservatives, poses a threat late for the two presumed favorites, David McCormick, a retired hedge fund manager and Dr. Mehmet Oz, a TV celebrity endorsed by former President Donald J. Trump.

Ms. Barnette, who publicly espoused homophobes and anti-muslim views, was propelled primarily by its strong debate performances and rags-to-riches history. Even Thursday’s news that Mr. Trump had questioned elements of his past and said only Dr. Oz could defeat the Democrats in November didn’t seem to bother her.

Hours after Mr. Trump’s statement, Ms. Barnette spoke at a Republican Party dinner.

“They’re coming out with long knives at this point,” she told the audience in Southampton, about a half-hour drive north of Philadelphia. “Right? And I had the greatest day of my life today.

Later, speaking to reporters who were mostly shut out of the event, she said she interpreted Mr Trump’s comments as “supportive”. The former president had said she “could never win” the November legislative elections, but that she had a “wonderful future” in the Republican Party.

“We know President Trump doesn’t mince his words,” she said. “I think that letter was supportive. And I look forward to working with the president.

In campaign videos and in front of voters, she explains that she spent at least part of her childhood living on a pig farm in southern Alabama, in the “one stop” town of Nichburg, in a house without insulation, without running water or indoor toilets.

“But this country has allowed me to be able to create a different narrative for myself,” she told Republicans on Wednesday at a campaign forum hosted by a group disgruntled with the traditional Pennsylvania GOP and hopes to elect a list of more conservative candidates for the state committee.

“But this country is about to disappear,” she warned in a singsong speech that blended the confidence of the pulpit with the intimacy of the confessional. “So we need good people now to stand up and start fighting for the greatest nation that has ever existed.”

His vision of what that might look like is unambiguous.

She opposes gun control and abortion rights and proposes limiting federal government involvement in the health care industry. She ridiculed the Muslim faith by online posts and promotes Mr. Trump’s lie that the 2020 election was stolen. In a 2010 essay, published online by Canada Free Press, she argued that the gay rights movement – ​​which she called “immoral and evil” – sought “dominion” and needed to be thwarted, citing the Bible as justification.

“Make no mistake, homosexuality is a targeted group in the Bible, just like cheats, drunkards, liars, rude people, extortionists, thieves and every other habitual sin,” she wrote. .

In an interview, she said she had no plans to move to the center if she won next week.

And for the line of people who hovered nearby at campaign events on Wednesday and Thursday hoping to snap a selfie with Ms Barnette, her outspokenness and life story were key selling points.

“She’s genuine,” said Dr. Anthony Mannarino, an eye surgeon who said his parents moved to the United States from Italy when he was 2 and neither of them had done any surgery. studies beyond the fifth year.

“It doesn’t look like she’s come from out of town to take up a Senate seat,” Dr. Mannarino added, hitting Dr. Oz and Mr. McCormick, who both returned to Pennsylvania relatively recently. . State. Ms. Barnette calls them carpet baggers.

“I want an ordinary person,” Dr. Mannarino said. “I want someone who knows how much a burger costs and fills their own gas tank.”

Ms. Barnette, the author of “Nothing to Lose, Everything to Gain: Being Black and Conservative in America,” moved from Alabama after graduating from college and has lived in Pennsylvania for eight years, according to her campaign manager.

She and her husband, Carl, own a four-bedroom home in Huntingdon Valley, a suburb of Philadelphia, according to property records. For six years, she said, she homeschooled her son and daughter while appearing as a conservative commentator on “Fox & Friends.”

“She’s a new face in government,” said Conrad J. Kraus, a real estate broker and builder who lives around the corner from Ms. Barnette and handed out flyers announcing an open house for the candidate on Sunday. A Trump flag hangs from his tree. A doormat reading “Don’t Blame This Family. We voted for Trump,” greets visitors.

“A new face,” he said Thursday, predicting a win. “I like this.”

The Barnettes also owned property in Texas, according to property records, and her book biography on Amazon says she lived in Virginia.

In the 1990s, she spent seven years in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve, reaching the rank of specialist, said U.S. Army spokeswoman Madison Bonzo. She graduated with a finance degree from Troy State University in Alabama in 1997, according to the school, making her the first person in her family to earn a college degree. She then earned an MBA from Fontbonne University in Missouri.

She has been a Registered Republican since at least 2015, and in a new video she said she never voted for Barack Obama, refuting claims she once backed him, after a Change.org petition surfaced indicating that she hoped to erect a statue in Her Honour.

His first election candidacy, in 2020, was a flop. She lost a House race by 19 percentage points to incumbent Democratic Rep. Madeleine Dean. She never conceded the race, said Timothy D. Mack, spokesman for Ms. Dean. Yet she began her Senate campaign almost immediately afterwards.

She has mastered Mr. Trump’s knack for sticking to a simple campaign message, distilling the financial effect of complex economic forces causing rising inflation into a one-syllable word: squeeze.

“People are feeling rushed right now,” she said this week. “How many of you have the feeling that something has gone wrong? »

She is competing in a primary for a seat held by a Republican senator, Pat Toomey, who announced he would retire after voting to impeach Mr Trump. (Senator Toomey told Axios that there are a lot of “voters who don’t know” about Ms Barnette.)

After a Washington Examiner article published Wednesday raised questions about her education, military experience and college credentials, she used it as fodder during a campaign stop later in the day.

“How long have I said I was running for the Senate? Thirteen months. And today the media just found out about my existence,” Ms Barnette said, prompting laughter.

But in halls filled almost entirely with white voters, it was Ms Barnette’s fierce opposition to abortion that seemed most important.

Christine Heitman, a 50-year-old software engineer, said she respects the difficult choice made by Ms Barnette’s mother to carry her pregnancy to term, noting that even opponents of abortion often make room for exceptions in cases of rape or incest. Ms. Barnette’s success, Ms. Heitman said, is proof of the sanctity of life.

“It looks like she had a life worth living, even though she was very poor,” Ms Heitman said.

Kitty Bennett contributed research.

]]>
Slate Names Former HuffPost Editor-in-Chief as New Editor-in-Chief https://fcacleveland.org/slate-names-former-huffpost-editor-in-chief-as-new-editor-in-chief/ Wed, 11 May 2022 18:21:18 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/slate-names-former-huffpost-editor-in-chief-as-new-editor-in-chief/ Slate has named Hillary Frey, former HuffPost editor-in-chief, as its new editor. In a memo to staff on Wednesday, Slate chief executive Dan Check said Ms Frey was “the right person to lead Slate’s newsroom through this new phase of growth”, noting both her years of experience and understanding of “the challenges and opportunities of […]]]>

Slate has named Hillary Frey, former HuffPost editor-in-chief, as its new editor.

In a memo to staff on Wednesday, Slate chief executive Dan Check said Ms Frey was “the right person to lead Slate’s newsroom through this new phase of growth”, noting both her years of experience and understanding of “the challenges and opportunities of this current media environment.

Slate, one of the few surviving original digital media outlets, has struggled in recent years to navigate the new media landscape and find a sustainable business model. He has been without an editor since early January, when Jared Hohlt resigned. Mr. Hohlt, who held the post for three years, will soon join the New York Times’ T magazine.

Ms. Frey is currently Creative-in-Residence at the City University of New York’s Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. She was previously editor-in-chief of HuffPost, a role she left in 2021 after HuffPost was acquired by BuzzFeed. Ms. Frey has also led newsrooms at NBC News, Adweek, Yahoo News and Fusion.

“I feel a deep, very long-standing connection to Slate and what they do,” Ms. Frey said in an interview this week. “Being smart, being irreverent, having fun, coming up with great, interesting ideas that may be right in front of you but no one has put into words yet and just have really sharp analysis.”

Slate was launched in 1996 with the backing of Microsoft and quickly became known for its clever analysis, interesting debates and top-notch journalistic talent. It was sold in 2004 to The Washington Post Company, which was renamed Graham Holdings after Jeff Bezos bought the Post newspaper.

The website, however, has seen a number of high-profile departures this year, including Gabriel Roth, who ran the podcast division, and Laura Bennett, the editorial director.

The Times reported in February that a consultant Graham Holdings had hired to help shore up Slate’s business told staff members that the outlet was not profitable and that she would advise on ways to strengthen the business.

Mr. Check said in his email to staff on Wednesday that Slate had spent the last few months refining its editorial mission, improving its structure, recruiting people and growing its membership business, which he said, ” exceeded revenue expectations this year.”

Ms Frey said she felt ‘incredibly confident about Slate’, adding: ‘I wouldn’t find myself in a situation that I didn’t think had a really, really bright and successful future.

Ms. Frey will take office on June 6. She will report to Mr. Check and oversee the newsroom and digital operations. The podcast division, which has found success with podcasts like “Slow Burn,” is headed by Alicia Montgomery.

]]>
Man dead after ‘brazen’ shooting in North York Square https://fcacleveland.org/man-dead-after-brazen-shooting-in-north-york-square/ Tue, 10 May 2022 02:54:18 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/man-dead-after-brazen-shooting-in-north-york-square/ A man has died following a shooting in a busy North York square, Toronto police confirm. Emergency crews were called to the Jane Street and Wilson Avenue area shortly after 8:30 p.m. Police said they located a man with gunshot wounds and his injuries appeared to be life-threatening. Emergency crews attempted to revive him but […]]]>

A man has died following a shooting in a busy North York square, Toronto police confirm.

Emergency crews were called to the Jane Street and Wilson Avenue area shortly after 8:30 p.m.

Police said they located a man with gunshot wounds and his injuries appeared to be life-threatening. Emergency crews attempted to revive him but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

“I don’t think there’s an immediate threat to the community right now,” Duty Inspector Paul Krawczyk told reporters. “I know this is a very busy area and so I plead with the public that anyone who may have dash cam footage or other footage that was in this area around 8:30 a.m., that she provide them to the police.”

Krawczyk said police believe the shooting was targeted.

There is no word as of yet on the possible suspects.

The shooting took place when many people were shopping in the area and Krawczyk called the killing “brazen”.

“It’s very cheeky. It’s worrying. And every time you see that, you know I could have my family here shopping, right? ” He said. “So this is very concerning and we take this very seriously and we will investigate this as well as we can to have a positive outcome.”

Police are urging anyone with information to contact investigators or call Crime Stoppers anonymously.

Editor’s Note: This story has been corrected to show that filming took place in North York

]]>
14 Vogue Staff On The Best Advice They Got From Their Moms https://fcacleveland.org/14-vogue-staff-on-the-best-advice-they-got-from-their-moms/ Sun, 08 May 2022 13:16:05 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/14-vogue-staff-on-the-best-advice-they-got-from-their-moms/ My mother’s best advice is the simplest: “Be nice.” When I was 20 and she visited me in New York, I was embarrassed when she greeted people in my neighborhood with a smile and a “Hello.” Now I find myself doing it on my way to work. There are a few simpler ways to make […]]]>

My mother’s best advice is the simplest: “Be nice.” When I was 20 and she visited me in New York, I was embarrassed when she greeted people in my neighborhood with a smile and a “Hello.” Now I find myself doing it on my way to work. There are a few simpler ways to make me feel better. —Nicole Phelps, Global Director, Vogue Runway and Vogue Business

“Honey, go to bed”

Photo: Courtesy of Chioma Nnadi

“Honey, go to bed.” That was always the advice my mother gave me, her overly conscientious child. As a teenager, I spent hours studying late into the night for fear of failure. Sleep seemed like such an epic waste of time. I was desperate to know all things upside down, upside down. At the time, I had no idea the importance of resting my mind, of taking a break, of looking away from the screen. She was the first person to teach me the importance of self-care, maybe because she never had a free moment for herself. She worked night shifts for decades, barely slept a wink so she could be there for us during the day. Did the most for us. It destroyed his health. And it’s always something that hurts my heart. Now when I spend time with her, I try to remember those words. I indulge in relaxing things with her. During her cancer treatment, she discovered mindfulness. Once in a while we lay down on the floor before bed and play one of his yoga nidra meditations. At the end, we usually laugh together, but it’s so nice to still be with her. —Chioma Nnadi, Global Network Manager and Editor-in-Chief, Vogue.com

Action speaks louder than words

Photo: Courtesy of Virginia Smith

Rather than giving advice, my mother showed me the way by example. My mom showed me how compassion could turn a volunteer role into a full-time job helping children with disabilities. Her determination and dedication showed me that women are a force to be reckoned with. She showed me how love, humor and friendship strengthen a 60-year marriage. Recently, with the passing of my dear father, my mother showed me the honesty of dealing with great loss and the gratitude of great love. On this Mother’s Day and every day, my mom has shown me that actions speak louder than words. —Virginia Smith, Global Head of Fashion Network

“Nobody is better than you, and you are better than nobody”

Photo: Courtesy of Carolina Gonzalez

]]>
NYT Crossword Answers: Czech Control Units https://fcacleveland.org/nyt-crossword-answers-czech-control-units/ Thu, 05 May 2022 02:00:04 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/nyt-crossword-answers-czech-control-units/ We can therefore clearly see the spiral in the black squares, but the theme, as I said above, does not stop there. Other theme elements include: 1. The circled squares which, read from left to right and from top to bottom, form FIBONACCI.2. The MATH TEACHER at 17A.3. The SPIRAL input at 30A.4. SUNFLOWERS, in […]]]>

We can therefore clearly see the spiral in the black squares, but the theme, as I said above, does not stop there. Other theme elements include:

1. The circled squares which, read from left to right and from top to bottom, form FIBONACCI.
2. The MATH TEACHER at 17A.
3. The SPIRAL input at 30A.
4. SUNFLOWERS, in 61A, whose seed pattern contains the FIBONACCI SPIRAL.
5. The GOLDEN RATIO at 11D.
6. The NAUTILI at 27D.
7. The famous SEQUENCE (FIBONACCI) in 37D.
8. This may not be related, but might as well add SCIENCE CAMP to 12D, just to be sure.

Phew! It’s a ground wrap in a 15×15 square grid.

There are always compromises to be made when packing a grid like this (I’m looking at you, KORUNAS and STRAWY), but Mr. Wagner’s puzzle is illuminating and fun to solve. I can handle a few not-so-good entries for that.

The whole Fibonacci shtick appears in unexpected places, so I guess it shouldn’t have been so surprising that his name has exactly nine letters, and that there are exactly nine Fibonacci numbers that appear in a standard crossword in Week. And yet, when I realized the realization for the first time, I really, audibly, have a corny breath. My first crack on the grid used standard symmetry, but something about it just felt…wrong. If I was going to do a Fibonacci themed puzzle, I felt like I really had to ooze Fibonacci, you know?

Fortunately, he came back to me with another happy little coincidence on the mark, reminding me that I could use his SPIRAL to inspire grid art. This not only made the puzzle more fibonac-y, but also made it easier to deal with the circled squares, as this puzzle’s lack of traditional symmetry meant I could move black boxes around without messing up all the cell numbers.

Too bad a few of my clues missed the cut – I thought “Freshman?” was a pretty nifty way to indicate COOL DUDE. And I really shouldn’t spoil this one because I’ll probably try to use it again in the future, but come on, “Whopper jr.” is an index ripper for FIB.

Thanks to the puzzle editors for letting me nerd on this one. And as always, if you wish to complain, congratulate or collaborate, my DMs are still open.

The New York Times Crossword has an open submission system, and you can submit your puzzles online.

For tips on how to get started, read our “How to Make a Crossword Puzzle” series.

Resolution almost done, but need a bit more help? We have what you need.

Warning: There are spoilers ahead, but subscribers can take a look at the answer key.

Trying to return to the puzzle page? Right here.

Your thoughts?

]]>
May 3, 2022 Letters to the Editor: Thanking Pandemic Heroes, More https://fcacleveland.org/may-3-2022-letters-to-the-editor-thanking-pandemic-heroes-more/ Tue, 03 May 2022 09:06:15 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/may-3-2022-letters-to-the-editor-thanking-pandemic-heroes-more/ pandemic heroes Last Thursday, your newspaper’s headline declared that the United States was “out of the pandemic phase” of the COVID nightmare. Most of us no longer wear masks and feel the worst is over. We endured suffering previously unimaginable. Nearly one million people have died from COVID-19 in our country alone. Many of them […]]]>

pandemic heroes

Last Thursday, your newspaper’s headline declared that the United States was “out of the pandemic phase” of the COVID nightmare. Most of us no longer wear masks and feel the worst is over.

We endured suffering previously unimaginable. Nearly one million people have died from COVID-19 in our country alone. Many of them were “essential workers”, people who put themselves at risk to get us through this crisis.

Now that we’re breathing easier, isn’t it time to thank our pandemic heroes? Gainesville – and every city – must honor these people in an appropriate way so that they feel our appreciation. They should hear our united voices say, “We cannot thank you enough for your service and sacrifice.

Glenn Terry, Gainesville

More letters:

Readers Comment on UF Construction, Creation of City Ombudsman and More

]]>
Other candidates use Trump after he endorses Vance https://fcacleveland.org/other-candidates-use-trump-after-he-endorses-vance/ Sun, 01 May 2022 09:01:18 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/other-candidates-use-trump-after-he-endorses-vance/ Ohio Senate race: Other candidates use Trump after he endorses Vance News Sports Entertainment Life Money Tech Travel Opinion JD Vance is the favorite to win the Republican Senate primary in Ohio on Tuesday after winning an endorsement from Donald Trump. That hasn’t stopped Vance’s GOP rivals from tying themselves to the ex-president. Ohio Republicans […]]]>
Ohio Senate race: Other candidates use Trump after he endorses Vance

JD Vance is the favorite to win the Republican Senate primary in Ohio on Tuesday after winning an endorsement from Donald Trump. That hasn’t stopped Vance’s GOP rivals from tying themselves to the ex-president.

  • Ohio Republicans will select their Senate nominee on Tuesday in a race to succeed retired Rob Portman.
  • JD Vance is the favorite to win the nomination after former President Donald Trump endorsed him.
  • Given Trump’s popularity among Republicans in Ohio, Vance’s GOP rivals are promoting their ties to Trump.

GROVE CITY, Ohio — In the final days of Ohio’s deadly Republican primary for an open U.S. Senate seat, Don Cary was still on the fence.

The 75-year-old had all but disqualified JD Vance from his ballot due to the venture capitalist and author‘s past comments about former President Donald Trump. But Cary felt he needed to reconsider when Trump pushed aside those comments to support Vance.

Help Terms of Service Privacy Policy Your California Privacy Rights / Privacy Policy Our Ethical Principles Sitemap

© 2022 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC.

]]>
How to write for finance and development https://fcacleveland.org/how-to-write-for-finance-and-development/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 09:27:48 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/how-to-write-for-finance-and-development/ How to write for Finance & Development What is Finance & Development? F&D is the IMF’s most read magazine. It focuses on issues related to macroeconomics, development and finance. It is editorially independent and features authors both inside and outside the Fund. Articles are published online throughout the year and a subset of articles appear […]]]>

How to write for Finance & Development

  1. What is Finance & Development?

F&D is the IMF’s most read magazine. It focuses on issues related to macroeconomics, development and finance. It is editorially independent and features authors both inside and outside the Fund. Articles are published online throughout the year and a subset of articles appear in our quarterly print edition (March, June, September and December). In addition to English, F&D appears in Arabic, Chinese, French, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

  1. Who reads Finance & Development?

F&D readers are well-educated people with an interest in economic and development issues – many are policy makers in the public and private sectors – but they are not necessarily economists. More than 3 million people read F&D’s digital edition each year, and our weekly e-newsletter has a six-figure audience. Our readership is therefore both broad and deep.

  1. Why write for Finance & Development?

Writing for F&D is a great way to reach a well-educated global audience to pitch an idea or share a perspective that can contribute to an ongoing debate. F&D is about accessibility: it offers the opportunity to talk about what you know in a way that will resonate with a wide range of people, from well-educated members of the public to academics and policy makers.

  1. How to write for non-specialists?

The tone of your article should be that of a serious mainstream magazine.The Economist, Foreign Policy, The Atlantic Monthly, for example, not that of an academic journal. You must present your article to a wide audience. Some tips:

First impressions last a lifetime…

  • Engage your readers with a lively opening and immediately establish that your angle is interesting, important, and new.
  • Attract the reader with concrete and colorful examples.
  • Avoid jargon, overly formal language and technical analysis which can be difficult for non-expert readers.

Serious subjects can also be engaging…

  • Focus on what is happening in the world around us and how challenges need to be addressed; discussion of what happens within institutions or the economic profession should be included only insofar as it relates to the outside world (avoid the inside baseball).
  • Provide analysis leading to conclusions and recommendations; don’t just describe.
  • Be concise – ask yourself what can be cut without disrupting the article. Less is more. Along the same lines, use compelling examples and avoid sweeping statements and platitudes.
  • Use graphics wisely. Ask yourself: what is the key message you want an audience to take away from the data. Many graphics fail because they try to communicate too many messages and don’t effectively account for how the average reader will interpret the visualization and ultimately come away with something understandable and memorable.
  • Keep references to a maximum of five and avoid footnotes.

Make your parting words memorable…

  • Close the article on a forward-looking note – share a preview of what’s next.
  1. How to submit an article?

Submit your proposal to COMFDMAG@imf.org. Include a brief overview and a link to any related documents.

We will study your proposal and contact you if we wish to pursue it. Our editorial team may seek to discuss this further with you before a final decision is made. If given a green light, the editor assigned to you will provide a word limit and other guidance.

Once written, send us your article by e-mail as a Word document. Graphs should be in Excel files, along with data. Create separate files for text, tables, and graphics.

Since the goal is to make the article accessible to a general audience, your article will be edited. The amount of editing we do varies. You will be asked to define or explain technical terms or concepts. We rewrite passages as necessary to eliminate jargon or make the argument clearer; we may also need to shorten the articles to print them.

After editing, we share the draft with F&D Advisory Board (Senior Fund Economists) through a double-blind peer review process. Advisors often provide detailed and substantive comments, which you are encouraged to consider. Your revised article will then be corrected. Throughout the process we will stay in close contact – we will always show you a final version for your approval.

We look forward to cooperating with you.

Thanks for stopping by…if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us at COMFDMAG@imf.org

The F&D team

Opinions expressed in articles and other materials are those of the authors; they do not necessarily reflect IMF policy.

]]>