Writer – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 22:34:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Writer – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 Cape Breton-born Kavanagh excels as a writer and visual artist https://fcacleveland.org/cape-breton-born-kavanagh-excels-as-a-writer-and-visual-artist/ https://fcacleveland.org/cape-breton-born-kavanagh-excels-as-a-writer-and-visual-artist/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 14:54:30 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/cape-breton-born-kavanagh-excels-as-a-writer-and-visual-artist/ SYDNEY, NS – While many of us struggle to become proficient in one discipline, Basma Kavanagh is one of those rare people who excels in two disciplines. “I’ve always had this inclination,” said the artist who also writes. “I feel like they’re all connected, but sometimes I find that I tend to focus on one […]]]>

SYDNEY, NS – While many of us struggle to become proficient in one discipline, Basma Kavanagh is one of those rare people who excels in two disciplines.

“I’ve always had this inclination,” said the artist who also writes. “I feel like they’re all connected, but sometimes I find that I tend to focus on one thing for a while. It could be a period of months or years, then something else for a while. They all feed on each other and they are definitely connected. It takes time to master something. It can be difficult to juggle them because I find that in order to stay up to date and be proficient you have to give it time so it can be crazy juggling and sometimes I think, why wouldn’t I choose one?

“But I can not.”


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Kavanagh was recently named to the 2021 CBC Nonfiction Award long list for her essay “Bone Shadows,” which reflects the many forms of mourning in the years following her father’s death. Although she did not win, it is still national recognition for her writing which also includes three books of poetry, “Distillo”, “Niche” and “Ruba’iyat for the time of apricots”.

“I was surprised but delighted,” Kavanagh said from her home in Canning, Kings County. “It’s a bit like peer recognition.

“I think working in rural Nova Scotia and being a writer can be quite isolating and so it’s something that people will hear about my work… it’s a great way to connect with a lot of people. . “

These are the three books of Basma Kavanagh. She also designed and painted the covers for “Distillo” and “Ruba’iyat for the Time of Apricots”. Contributed – Contributed

Although she is increasingly well known in the Canadian literary world, thanks to a multitude of nominations, the Westmount native is perhaps equally well known for her art.

She works in a variety of media, including acrylic, egg tempera, mixed media, paints and watercolors as well as sculpture and textiles. Its subject tends to be natural subjects such as trees and plants. She also designs and prints her own art books.

“I do a lot of artist books and so with these I can kind of be responsible for their look and design – the imagery, the text – so it’s a place where I have control. , but often in editing, sometimes there is flexibility but sometimes it’s just a question of text so there isn’t a lot of room for the visuals.

Despite this, she still managed to design the covers of her first and third books, “Distillo” and “Ruba’iyat for the Time of Apricots”.

Kavanagh has lived in various parts of Canada, sometimes moving for a job, but she is now working full time on her art in Canning. She isn’t returning to Cape Breton as much as she used to, but that can be blamed on COVID restrictions over the past two years. She used Lockdown Time for further inspiration and the resulting art will be released at a later date.

Currently, Kavanagh is working on a book of essays and there are plans for another book of poetry in the future.

Elizabeth Patterson is a cultural reporter for the Cape Breton Post.


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My Favorite Neglected Black Writer – by Bernardine Evaristo, Margaret Atwood and more | Books https://fcacleveland.org/my-favorite-neglected-black-writer-by-bernardine-evaristo-margaret-atwood-and-more-books/ https://fcacleveland.org/my-favorite-neglected-black-writer-by-bernardine-evaristo-margaret-atwood-and-more-books/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 09:31:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/my-favorite-neglected-black-writer-by-bernardine-evaristo-margaret-atwood-and-more-books/ Tthink of “classical literature” and many white authors probably come to mind: Shakespeare, Dickens, Austen, Hardy, Woolf, Fitzgerald. Harper Lee, who wrote In regards to breed, is a favorite of many – but black authors themselves are grossly under-represented. Students might have the chance to study Toni Morrison or James Baldwin, but what about the […]]]>

Tthink of “classical literature” and many white authors probably come to mind: Shakespeare, Dickens, Austen, Hardy, Woolf, Fitzgerald. Harper Lee, who wrote In regards to breed, is a favorite of many – but black authors themselves are grossly under-represented. Students might have the chance to study Toni Morrison or James Baldwin, but what about the rest of the vast history of black literature? Reports from last year revealed that it was possible for students to complete their GCSE and leave school without studying a single novel or play by a non-white author. It wasn’t until 2019 that the UK’s most prestigious fiction prize, the Booker Prize, was first awarded to a black British author: Bernardine Evaristo (who shared it).

In June 2020, the Black Writers’ Guild was established with the aim of creating “a sustainable, profitable, fair and equal ecosystem for black literary talent in UK publishing”. And for Black History Month this year, the British Library has produced a timeline of black literature in Britain, to celebrate its rich history since the publication in 1550 of A Geographical Historie of Africa by John Leo Africanus in current innovative writers like Debbie Tucker Green and Caleb Femi.

In recognition of all this, we asked contemporary writers to share the black authors who inspired them, and who deserve to be better known.

“An inspiration”… James Berry in 1985. Photograph: Alamy

Malorie Blackman on James Berry

Malorie blackman
Photograph: Antonio Olmos / The Guardian

A thief in the village and other stories, by James Berry (1924-2017), was the very first children’s book I read written by a black author living in the UK. It was in the late 1980s and I remember wandering around a children’s bookstore in Covent Garden, London when it jumped out at me because it was the only book with a black child on blanket throughout the store – and yes, I had searched and asked. When I got home I read all the wonderful stories in one sitting. They were fun, moving and full of life. Berry’s prose sounded and sang, as did his poetry. Some of the characters in the stories spoke in patois – something else that I had never seen before in a British children’s book. Berry’s book was an inspiration, just the sting and encouragement I needed to try and publish my own stories.
Malorie Blackman’s most recent novel is Endgame.

Bernardine Evaristo on Beryl Gilroy

Bernardine Evaristo
Photograph: Suki Dhanda / The Guardian

I just wrote the intro to the Black Teacher reissue by Beryl Gilroy (1924-2001), what I like. She was Britain’s first black school principal and also a novelist. She immigrated here from Guyana in 1952, and the book is a wonderful account of her early years as a teacher in London. I challenge anyone to read it and not come away shocked, moved and entertained. Gilroy is one of the unsung heroines of British black literature, and while Guyanese writer ER Braithwaite’s autobiographical novel To Sir, With Love was celebrated and turned into a Hollywood film, Gilroy’s memoirs have passed under the radar until today. She was a pioneer and we must remember her contribution to literary history.
Bernardine Evaristo’s most recent book is Manifesto.

Chinua Achebe.
“One of the greatest”… Chinua Achebe. Photograph: Mike Cohea / AP

Margaret Atwood on Chinua Achebe

MARGARET ATWOOD, TOUR TO TORONTO FOR GUARDIAN WEEKEND
Photograph: Derek Shapton / The Guardian

This was in 1958. Segregation was still in effect in the United States, as was apartheid in South Africa, although resistance to both grew. Things Fall Apart, the great debut novel by Chinua Achebe (1930-2013), broke into the scene. He was among the first to examine the colonial experience from the perspective of those affected. There are no angels in this book, only imperfect human beings, but what is plotted in depth is how traditional cultures crumble when outside forces are exerted on them. How do people cope with the perceived anarchy and felt desperation when their rules – even their unfair rules – suddenly disappear? Achebe is one of the greatest, a magical writer.
Margaret Atwood’s most recent novel is The Testaments.

Joanne Harris on Alexandre Dumas

Joanne harris
Photograph: Simone Padovani / Awakening / Getty Images

I read Georges for the first time by Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870) like a child. Although this is one of Dumas’ lesser-known works, I loved it – and I still love it. Partly because of his wayward plot, but also because it is on its own the only book by Dumas that reflects his mixed heritage and openly confronts the subject of race. Set in the 19th century, Georges tells the story of Georges Munier, an intelligent and sensitive young man who grew up in Mauritius. Son of a wealthy man of mixed African and European descent, Georges soon comes to recognize his father’s feeling of inferiority vis-à-vis whites, and decides to be different. The ensuing adventure combines swordplay, slave rebellion, thrilling escape, and a vow of revenge, culminating in a sufficiently dramatic resolution.
Joanne Harris’ most recent novel is A Narrow Door.

David Olusoga on Olaudah Equiano

David Olusoga
Photograph: Karen Robinson / The Observer

I was a student when I first read the book by Olaudah Equiano (1745-1797). His memoirs, The Interesting Story of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, made a big impression on me. It was my first time reading a first-hand account in the present tense written by someone who had truly experienced slavery. The voice that rises from its pages is not that of a historian, casting an analytical look at the events of the past, but that of an African who lived in slavery and escaped from its clutches, a man capable of us. speak directly about the past. Equiano’s book is one of many “Slave Tales,” autobiographies written by former slaves in the 18th and 19th centuries, but in the British context it is the most comprehensive and powerful. Equiano emerges as an incredibly complex figure, a man aware of the power of his words, the suffering of his people and the potential of his story.
David Olusoga wrote the introduction to a new edition of The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

Stuart Room
‘Infinitely intelligent’… Stuart Hall in 2000. Photograph: Eamonn McCabe / The Guardian

Megan Nolan on Stuart Hall

Megan Nolan
Photograph: Linda Nylind / The Guardian

i only came to Stuart Hall (1932-2014) relatively recently. When I did, I was intensely moved by the generous breadth of thought, the elegance and simplicity of his writing, and above all by the imaginative work he demanded of his readers. It was right after the Brexit vote that I stumbled upon his essay The Great Moving Right Show on the implantation of Thatcherism – a good time to remember that a left response cannot be limited to polite, intelligent rebuttals. and well formulated; action, imaginative action, is required. Coming from a man of magnificent and unlimited intelligence, this prioritization of real social good over theoretical flourishes is all the more inspiring. His identification of what he called the “well-being hunter,” a well-designed folk devil “has unfortunately become more than less relevant in the decades since he wrote it.
Megan Nolan is the author of Acts of Desperation.

John A Williams in 2000.
Revolutionary… John A Williams in 2000. Photograph: Anthony Barboza / Getty Images

Jason Reynolds on John A Williams

Jason reynolds
Photograph: Roberto Ricciuti / Getty Images

John A Williams (1925-2015) was grossly underrated, an incredible talent. He wrote a whole bunch of books and they were all awesome. My favorite is Sons of Darkness, Sons of Light, which explains how we should deal with police violence, but he wrote it in the 1970s. He also wrote The Angry Ones, Sissie, The Man Who Cry I Amthis guy was a master. He’s written a lot about being a writer, which I find interesting. Specifically in Sons of Darkness, Sons of Light, he demonstrated a truly revolutionary approach to the way we think about point-of-view writing. I think he revolutionized multi-point-of-view history in a way I’ve never seen before and haven’t seen so well since.
Jason Reynolds’ most recent book is Look Both Ways.

Chronology

Black literature

Spectacle

Written by Gaverne Bennett and created with the British Library, this literary timeline explores the history of black writing and literature in Britain through some fifty texts. Download your copy of the poster or scroll through the digital version: www.bl.uk/black-literature-timeline

Thank you for your opinion.

Guardian Live will host an online event exploring British black literature on Monday, November 8th. Book your tickets here


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How the 704 bus line shaped the LA identity of writer Raquel Gutiérrez https://fcacleveland.org/how-the-704-bus-line-shaped-the-la-identity-of-writer-raquel-gutierrez/ https://fcacleveland.org/how-the-704-bus-line-shaped-the-la-identity-of-writer-raquel-gutierrez/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 23:11:09 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/how-the-704-bus-line-shaped-the-la-identity-of-writer-raquel-gutierrez/ Los Angeles is multicultural, multifaceted, stacked and sprawling at the same time. And everyone who lives here has a unique connection to this place. Raquel Gutiérrez wrote about how LA shaped its own identity in a recent personal essay for Places Journal. The message was: How do Latinos impact the built environment in Los Angeles? […]]]>

Los Angeles is multicultural, multifaceted, stacked and sprawling at the same time. And everyone who lives here has a unique connection to this place.

Raquel Gutiérrez wrote about how LA shaped its own identity in a recent personal essay for Places Journal. The message was: How do Latinos impact the built environment in Los Angeles?

KCRW asked them to read the first section of their article:

I lived in Silver Lake in the late 1990s, and every once in a while I would walk a few blocks to Sunset and take the 704 bus to Santa Monica to get to work. It was a reprieve from the spiritual emptiness of bumper to bumper.

The 704 took me to a booth where I recorded the inventory during my first and only job of the first dot-com boom. It was in 1999, just before Metallica’s Lars Ulrich sued Napster (in a case that would force the music file-sharing company out of business), and I was in charge of e-commerce for a record company in line located at the corner of the street. of Pico and Cloverfield. I got the job thanks to friends I made seeing live music in the heyday of an art-punk teenager. We grew up in DIY spaces and helped each other find jobs in the music industry, Burbank, and Hollywood. Promotional CDs, limited edition vinyls, and free concert tickets made it look like I had found the gold.

I didn’t need a college degree for this job. So why was I still nervous about never having one? Adulthood has crept up on me. I had failed to get into the elite colleges that my private Catholic high school mates had been training for all their lives. I spent my first year mourning the death of my best friend in a car crash and hitting my snare more than the books. Playing music was my comfort, and college felt as vague as any other recognizable goal in my life. I counted on sensory pleasure to orient myself towards the world of work.


Born and raised in Los Angeles, Raquel Gutiérrez credits the queer and feminist DIY culture of post-punk zine of the 1990s, as well as paid art internships in LA County and Getty, for introducing them to scenes and scenes. vibrant arts communities in Southern California. Photo courtesy of Gutiérrez.

Maybe that same sensory instinct, and an idea that such feelings were related to class, identity, difference, and belonging, shaped my hikes along Route 704. I didn’t wasn’t the only bus commuter at the office, where my co-workers were East Coast and Midwest transplants, still struggling to crack Greater LA transit codes, still dismayed at how the Angeleños go the distance. (They eventually made installments on the first wave of Prius.)

As a native of LA, I took the bus to read Roque Dalton’s poetry and try my own imitations. And as I walked through zip codes and views transformed from murals depicting the Mesoamerican ancestors of many of my neighbors to the architecturally promiscuous porticoes of Beverly Hills, I chatted with middle-aged mothers on their way to manage. other people’s houses and children – a burst of familiarity, since my mother had done it too, as a young woman, just a few years before I was born.

I remember someone a few years older than me asking if my husband would let me work. I wish I could credit the woman who explained what Eightlacoche is – the edible corn mushroom that some people compare to a truffle. But most of the conversations ended with the two awkwardly aware parties in a ditch. I was born in Los Angeles to parents who, due to their own luck (or bad luck) when arriving in the early 1970s, had become United States citizens under the United States Reform and Control Act, 1986. the immigration of Ronald Reagan, who had granted amnesty to those who entered the country illegally before 1982.

My father had come from Mexico, the state capital of Hidalgo, to harvest potatoes in Wisconsin and lettuce in Watsonville, south of Santa Cruz. In 1970, after two years in the Golden State, he was unceremoniously returned – by bus – to El Paso, where he was left to walk on the bridge to Ciudad Juarez. He quickly made a plan to return and this time found relief in the anonymity of Los Angeles. It has had the hardest knocks of moving north to a country that wants your job but not your personality – while my mom flew in and found her own way to a 704 stop near the San Vicente link. , Wilshire and Santa Monica Boulevards, where the Bermuda Triangle of Beverly Hills engulfs its Latinx workforce. Finally, she exceeded the duration of her visa. But both of my parents were given amnesty, and while my father moved back and forth in political affiliations, my mother voted Republican for the next three decades in homage to the life-changing politics of Reagan, despite his interventionism against his country of origin, El Salvador.

I often think of my parents as having been two of thousands of similar erasures, those excluded from the city’s functional successes until they reached middle age. I also think about how the economic security they finally got allowed me to trip over my own politics. My mother had time to take my sister and I to the Huntington Park Library, to practice her English with every verse she read aloud from the worn copy of Children’s Bible Stories she kept. on the bedside table in the pink painted bedroom my sister and I shared. I still persist, 20 years later in this queer half-life, never to have found the opportunity to use the word “Latinx” around her (or around my father, who died last year). This despite the fact that, in other areas, I tamper with the complicated nuances of the term, its representational burden meant to index the story and create security for those whose gender is considered non-conforming.

There was a moment on my bus ride when, of the group of us leaving from the same destination, I was just left. I headed west to Santa Monica, in my own erasures.

You can read the rest of Gutiérrez’s essay in the place diary.

If you have a personal essay on how LA or SoCal shaped your identity, we would love to read and possibly share it. Email it to kathryn.barnes@kcrw.org.


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How to become a content writer https://fcacleveland.org/how-to-become-a-content-writer/ https://fcacleveland.org/how-to-become-a-content-writer/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/how-to-become-a-content-writer/ Opinions expressed by Contractor the contributors are theirs. As a content writer, you need a mind that masters both language and creativity. When I started my career as a junior content writer, the industry was still growing. I never imagined that seven years later I would be able to start my own content writing agency […]]]>

Opinions expressed by Contractor the contributors are theirs.

As a content writer, you need a mind that masters both language and creativity.

When I started my career as a junior content writer, the industry was still growing. I never imagined that seven years later I would be able to start my own content writing agency and earn a nice salary in different industries.

What does a content writer do?

Content writers are required to write carefully researched texts for clients. Clients contact editors to produce brochures, manuals, blogs, websites, journal articles and other forms of content. The scope of work covers Technical Writing, Product Descriptions, Writing, Cover Letter, Creative Writing, Essay Writing, Shadow Writing, SOP Writing, Resume Writing and more.

Related: Balancing Creativity And SEO In Content Writing

What are the different types of content writers?

The main types of content writers are:

  • Web Content Writer: As the name suggests, these writers produce content for the Internet. This content can range from writing product descriptions and blogging to services. Essentially, the job involves the writer researching the topic and writing an article or blog post for the client. The writer is also required to infuse keywords so that traffic is directed to the client’s webpage.

  • Technical writer: A technical writer will write on specific technical, medical or financial topics and write in a comprehensive manner for the reader. Customers need manuals, guides, articles and other content. In these cases, the writers must be well versed in the subject with the relevant qualifications.

  • Content writers for mass media: Newspaper editors, or correspondents, write about current events for offline and digital media. These writers are expected to be unbiased and ethical in their reporting. They can also review books or movies and write down their thoughts on a particular topic.

  • Ghost writers: Ghostwriters are writers who write blogs, website pages, eBooks, and other content under a fictitious name or on behalf of someone who pays to write for them.

Related: 5 Profitable Benefits of Outsourcing Your Content Creation

Get a writing job

Finding jobs is a problem for newcomers. However, as you build your customer base, getting a job becomes easier. The first step would be to prepare a portfolio and apply with it to similar companies. Many companies also advertise content writers.

It would also be a good idea to ask your clients for referrals. If the customer is hesitant, ask for a letter of recommendation. Lots of jobs come through referrals and word of mouth.

Alternatively, you can register on various websites that advertise the available jobs. If the job is in your field, you can quote and hope for the best. The competition is intense, so you may need to keep looking and applying. The best way to earn writing work is to present directly to clients or network with your previous clients and other contacts.

Protect yourself from defaulting customers

Once you have secured a job, you should require a written purchase order with payment details, payment schedule, delivery dates, cause for termination, and confidentiality, so that if an issue related to the payment occurs, you are well covered. This rarely happens, but you should have peace of mind knowing that you have something in writing.

If you are offered low-paying jobs or the client is known to be in default, you’d better turn down those jobs. You will also waste time and energy chasing your payment, time that could have been used otherwise to find new writing assignments.

Related: 6 Different Types Of Creative Content Copywriters Should Know


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Bienvenido Lumbera: The writer as a public intellectual https://fcacleveland.org/bienvenido-lumbera-the-writer-as-a-public-intellectual/ https://fcacleveland.org/bienvenido-lumbera-the-writer-as-a-public-intellectual/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/bienvenido-lumbera-the-writer-as-a-public-intellectual/ Bienvenido Lumbera, national artist, passed away last week. During a recent summons to Diliman where he was present, I said of all the Filipino writers I know, he is the one I envy the most. Much earlier, I told him this. Well had courage. He kept his word, which is why he was imprisoned by […]]]>

Bienvenido Lumbera, national artist, passed away last week. During a recent summons to Diliman where he was present, I said of all the Filipino writers I know, he is the one I envy the most. Much earlier, I told him this. Well had courage. He kept his word, which is why he was imprisoned by Marcos. He was a true scholar who researched our cultural past. Bien also received Asia’s most prestigious award – the Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Award.

Bien was orphaned in his childhood and grew up under the wing of parents. His credentials are impressive. He went to Santo Tomas for his baccalaureate and got his doctorate. in Comparative Literature at Indiana University. He has taught creative writing at UP, UST, La Salle and Ateneo and has lectured on Filipino culture at Osaka University of Foreign Studies.

Bien was really bilingual. I am not a judge of his Tagalog work; even his speech tended to be archaic – I grew up in Manila, my Tagalog is sidewalk lingua. Once I told him – I could barely understand his Batangueño, while I understood the Manila idiom of Jun Cruz Reyes. His essays in English, however, are models of clarity and eloquence.

The only time I didn’t agree with Bien was when he wrote the libretto for the CCP’s mega-production, Rama Hari, based on the Ramayana, the Hindu epic. I told him it should have been by the Indians. There are so many Filipino materials that our artists could recreate.

Bien also organized reviews of our films, awarded awards for excellence. At one point, he also chaired the Philippine Center of PEN International and received the Southeast Asian Writing Award in Bangkok.

Bien belonged to that group of writers not bypassed by creative or imaginary writing that are called public intellectuals.

My sympathies go out to his wife Cynthia and their children. They have lost someone very precious to them and to the country.

I have lost a dear friend.

* * *

The novelist or creative writer who turns to journalism is well equipped to do so. Creative writing requires intense observation, not only of visible and tactile phenomena, but also of character – hidden and manifested by action. A creative writer tries to answer all the whys that result in action and character building. It was for this reason that Nick Joaquin’s journalism was penetrating and insightful; his “A Question of Heroes”, for example, is a first-rate historiography. He traced the decisions, the direction taken by our men of destiny to their innate character. It is therefore possible to predict how a man – or a leader – may act or react to the challenges he is confronted with. In this debate over whether Rizal withdrew his belief in Masonry or not, his splendid biographer, Austin Coates, said that all of these testimonies and documents made by the Jesuits were lies or forgery because they were not ‘did not conform to Rizal’s character. This saying is always on my mind as I shape the characters in my fiction – their consistency, their normality. I don’t make them physically crippled or grotesque – it’s the easiest way for them to be attractive and unique. I do not deny them the contradictions, but these contractions must be justified.

Writers portraying literature to our nationalism – the essay, to illuminate or intensify their thinking – are well within the Western tradition since early historians like Herodotus also wrote travel essays. In modern European literature, they were moralists; this is particularly emphasized in the writings of Honoré de Balzac and Victor Hugo and, more recently, of Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. They were “engaged” – engaged. As such, their work has had more depth and impact. As the conscience of a nation, they influenced French society and earlier in French history sparked the French Revolution. Regarding our own history, a writer stands out as a committed, José Rizal.

In our time, this tradition – that is, the influence of Rizal – holds, but not as firmly as I had hoped. Our main writers in English other than Nick Joaquin and Carlos Bulosan, Ben Santos, the Tiempos of Dumaguete, NVM Gonzales, were not all engaged. Their writing was almost always limited to the literary genre – NVM who wrote from close to the earth had little to say about society outside of their fiction. Ditto with Manuel Arguilla, who was the most proletarian of them.

On the other hand, Gilda Cordero Fernando and Kerima Polotan were able to step away from creative writing and write some sharp social commentaries. And among the living, we will note Greg Brillantes, Elmer Ordoñez, Butch Dalisay and Krip Yuson.

We need more today to bind our people to the truth and to the past. Straying from creative writing doesn’t stray from the truth in any way. Too often, reality as described in a short story or novel seems more “true”. As the saying goes, journalism is history in a hurry. Literature is a lived story. Conditions in England during the Industrial Revolution are best appreciated by reading the novels of Charles Dickens. And Rizal’s novels give us a vivid picture of what it was like in the Philippines at the twilight of the Spanish regime.

As prophets, the many current realities of technological and scientific achievement were foretold in science fiction a hundred years ago; will science fiction be realities a century from now? Again, the truths must now be faithfully recorded.

* * *

Homosexuality is as old as humanity; it was common in ancient Greece. It was, however, considered abnormal in many societies, but in recent years it has come to be accepted. This development was preceded by the emergence of gay literature in the West to be considered a genre and, as such, deserving serious critical attention. We’ve had quite a few of them, some really great like Morli Dharam, Nick Joaquin and, yes, Jose Garcia Villa.

My favorite gay writer is Danton Remoto. A while ago, when I said that gays shouldn’t post their status, he called me an “old fart”. I found it funny. In fact, almost all writers display their identity – Catholic, Marxist, Ilokano, etc. Danton is moved by his cause, and he even organized a political party to defend it and stood for election. He is also a professor of creative writing and has trained writers here and abroad. His novel, Riverrun, is readable, exquisite in parts, and is a benchmark in our gay literature. The comparisons are odious, but he reminds me of Oscar Wilde, the English writer. He still has years ahead of him. What I would like to see in Danton is more fire, more passion and more commitment like the great American gay writer James Baldwin. Danton has the skill, the vocabulary to do it. Now, how to make him angry. Maybe he should start with Manny Pacquiao, whose rant against Danton’s tribe dominates them.


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Philadelphia Inquirer writer of ‘Choosing Blackness’ inspires Cabrini reporters – Loquitur https://fcacleveland.org/philadelphia-inquirer-writer-of-choosing-blackness-inspires-cabrini-reporters-loquitur/ https://fcacleveland.org/philadelphia-inquirer-writer-of-choosing-blackness-inspires-cabrini-reporters-loquitur/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:07:58 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/philadelphia-inquirer-writer-of-choosing-blackness-inspires-cabrini-reporters-loquitur/ Click here to listen to the full podcast. Students during an interview podcast with Elizabeth Wellington. Photo by Sophia Gerner Elizabeth Wellington saw what people called her mother a white woman, based on her skin tone, despite being a black woman. As a child, Wellington remembers a new child on his school bus asking, “Who’s […]]]>

Click here to listen to the full podcast.

Students during an interview podcast with Elizabeth Wellington. Photo by Sophia Gerner

Elizabeth Wellington saw what people called her mother a white woman, based on her skin tone, despite being a black woman.

As a child, Wellington remembers a new child on his school bus asking, “Who’s the white lady answering the door?” All my life people have asked me if my mother was white; It was my mother, who was black.

It was her mother who shaped Wellington’s “blackness”, inspiring a recent Philadelphia Inquirer essay exploring her identity. She said her mother was one of the most “militant and strong” people when it came to the dark.

These types of feelings made Wellington kiss her and be proud of her. darkness, which is also seen through his writing. Wellington, an award-winning journalist, shared her story and thoughts on her recent history with Loquitur staff.

She’s been killing this work for over 18 years and continues to provide her audiences with compelling topics. Loquitur staff received an honorary visit from a renowned journalist. She’s been killing this work for over 18 years and continues to provide her audiences with compelling topics.

Elizabeth Wellington, style columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, has been doing this since graduating from New York University. It has been featured in retail outlets including The Washington Post, Chicago Tribune and Seattle weather and has been awarded by the following organizations: The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), Keystone and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).

Wellington stories include, but are not limited to gender, race, well-being, fashion, style, and pop culture. The articles that fascinate her most concern black identity.

“The pain of being black hasn’t always been on my face, but when it was, it helped me as a writer,” Wellington said. Whether the article is about her family identity, the segregation laws in Philadelphia that impact the city today, or systemic racism, she was able to defend her personal point of view.

It wasn’t until Wellington grew up before she realized the hardships black people were going through. This would later inspire him to illustrate the concept of darkness. “As black people, we should all realize that we all play a bigger role in American history,” Wellington said.

Journalism course during Elizabeth Wellington’s visit. Photo by Sophia Gerner.

Researching her family’s lineage is her biggest inspiration for what she does. Knowing that her mother was fair skinned, she had discovered that her grandfather was mulatto (mixed). Asked about her genealogy and trying to find the answer but not being able to figure it out, Wellington said: “It’s a process… there was so much going on… as you get answers, you have more questions. ” Her mother taught Wellington that she should be proud of her black identity.

The subject of racial microaggressions was brought up throughout the conversation. Wellington attributed this to the normalcy that occurs throughout his tenure at the Philadelphia Inquirer. “In 2017, while I was in the bathroom after work, a coworker came up to me and said, ‘It’s good to have class in the White House again,” ”said Wellington.

“If this sounds like a micro-aggression, then it’s a micro-aggression,” Wellington said. Micro-attacks were more apparent due to the racial unrest that was highlighted in 2020.

“The story speaks for itself,” when Wellington is confronted with her views as a journalist, she shrugged with the phrase. During the speech, she added that the unease of non-BIPOC people about the dark is because people feel responsible for their actions and words.

“Recently, blacks can experience the dark in their own way. With the racial injustices highlighted earlier this year, there has been more effort to listen to a black point of view. A clearer spotlight on Juneteenth, acknowledging racist images and examining the struggle to be black in America, is a step in the right direction, but not enough.

She recently published an article on the R. Kelly verdict showing why it is important to listen to black women when they speak out. Wellington actively uses his voice to advocate for social justice issues that make a difference and greater impact.

Wellington wants his articles to emphasize the importance of black culture from a black perspective. Addressing a room full of Loquitur journalists, Wellington mentioned the importance of ethics in journalism. “Evaluate who you are as a journalist and bring your ethics as a person as a journalist. ”

Editor’s Note: Wellington has left an indelible mark on the staff of Loquitur with his wise words, amazing articles and eloquent language. We thank Elizabeth Wellington for the time and consideration she devoted to meeting with us and we wish her all the best. Over time, we anticipate his next amazing post and extol his passionate skills.


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Fronteras: South Texas writer remembers loved ones lost to COVID-19 during Día de los Muertos https://fcacleveland.org/fronteras-south-texas-writer-remembers-loved-ones-lost-to-covid-19-during-dia-de-los-muertos/ https://fcacleveland.org/fronteras-south-texas-writer-remembers-loved-ones-lost-to-covid-19-during-dia-de-los-muertos/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 10:45:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/fronteras-south-texas-writer-remembers-loved-ones-lost-to-covid-19-during-dia-de-los-muertos/ Oscar Cesares A Día de los Muertos altar assembled by the Cásares family. More than 700,000 people have died from COVID-19 in the United States Five counties in Texas are among top 20 in the country with the most virus-related deaths. The grim toll of the pandemic serves as the backdrop for Día de los […]]]>

Oscar Cesares

A Día de los Muertos altar assembled by the Cásares family.

More than 700,000 people have died from COVID-19 in the United States Five counties in Texas are among top 20 in the country with the most virus-related deaths.

The grim toll of the pandemic serves as the backdrop for Día de los Muertos, the Mexican holiday that celebrates the lives of loved ones lost. Its origins date back to the Aztecs 3,000 years ago and it has become increasingly popular in the United States, especially in Mexican-American communities.

This includes those along the Texas-Mexico border, who have experienced some of the harshest effects of the virus. A native of Brownsville and a writer, Oscar Cásares knows the heartbreak caused by the pandemic. He wrote about the loss of his cousin, Beto, in his 2020 Texas monthly article, “This year, the Día de los Muertos altar of our family will commemorate those who have died from the coronavirus”, Which also detailed how the pandemic has robbed the community comforts many seek when mourning a loss.

“This part is so consistent with the [grieving] process and ultimately healing, letting go, at least physically as much as we can, ”Cásares explained. “And that too was stolen from us with the pandemic. “

The Cásares essay will be presented in an upcoming Texas monthly collection, “Being texan”, Which explores what it means to be Texan through essays, stories and recipes.

Cásares will also make an appearance at this month’s show. Texas Book Festival, taking place virtually and in person in downtown Austin from October 23-31. He will also collaborate with the Agarita Chamber Players for an in-person performance of Border postcards October 15 at the Carver Community Cultural Center in San Antonio.


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New York Magazine Editor: Opposing Joe Biden Supports Authoritarianism https://fcacleveland.org/new-york-magazine-editor-opposing-joe-biden-supports-authoritarianism/ https://fcacleveland.org/new-york-magazine-editor-opposing-joe-biden-supports-authoritarianism/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/new-york-magazine-editor-opposing-joe-biden-supports-authoritarianism/ Media headlines October 7 In today’s media, FiveThirtyEight is sounding the alarm on Biden poll, MSNBC panel says public school protesters are influenced by ‘white supremacist ideology’ and CNN’s Brianna Keilar lectures Nikki Haley on racism in America New York Magazine writer Jonathan Chait claimed in a new essay that opposing President Joe Biden was […]]]>

New York Magazine writer Jonathan Chait claimed in a new essay that opposing President Joe Biden was essentially the same as supporting the authoritarianism that is taking hold in the United States.

In an article published Wednesday, Chait claimed that there was “no form of Republican politics” compatible with democracy, and that the party of former President Donald Trump was “an authoritarian project”.

“The Republican Party is presumably a vehicle for Trump’s authoritarian ambitions,” Chait wrote, citing an argument from a former anti-Trump Republican adviser. “Anything that moves the Republican Party forward is a vehicle for Trump’s attack on the Constitution.”

“Biden leads the ruling party,” he added. “Trump is the leader of the opposition. To oppose one is to support the other.”

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In what appeared to be a comparison of Trump to former German leader Adolf Hitler, Chait asserted that anyone who supported the normal political operations of the Republican Party, including overt criticism of Trump, “would throw lit matches around the ignition. of Trump’s next Reichstag fire ”.

The Reichstag fire refers to the alleged Nazi false flag arson of 1933, when a German legislative building was set on fire in a fire allegedly started by Communist sympathizers.

The Reichstag building in Berlin, Germany.
(REUTERS / Fabrizio Bensch)

Chait cited another writer‘s argument that Trump’s “threat” to American democracy was not so great that it required drastic action, such as the “extreme measure” of finding a way. to prevent him from taking power.

“Trump doesn’t have to be a potential Hitler, or even a Mussolini, to justify the suspension of our normal rules of political conduct,” Chait wrote.

FROM JOE ROGAN TO MIKE FLYNN, THE INCREASE IN BASHING – AND BAN – IDEOLOGICAL OPPONENTS

“Republicans want to believe that they can smooth their way to power without being complicit in their designs. But Trump’s Republican Party is an authoritarian project. As of yet, there is no form of Republican politics compatible with it. democracy, ”he added.

Chait faced extensive social media criticism of the article, with critics calling the article a case for a one-party state and essentially saying “you are with us or you are with the terrorists. “.

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Other critics called Chait’s article “state media” and “an essay on why the state must crush dissent.”

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“The demonization will get worse before it gets better. It is already brimming with ugly electoral rhetoric in public policy. It will get worse too,” wrote Wikipedia co-founder Larry Sanger, while another critic pointed out that Chait had wrote a previous article pleading for the Liberals to actually support Trump’s 2016 presidential nomination.

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Narrow From Writer, Director, Actor Anna Chazelle https://fcacleveland.org/narrow-from-writer-director-actor-anna-chazelle/ https://fcacleveland.org/narrow-from-writer-director-actor-anna-chazelle/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/narrow-from-writer-director-actor-anna-chazelle/ A backpack A woman trudges through what looks like a sunburnt field of grass, fiddling with a bottle of water that contains only a few drops. Things would only seem slightly serious if she hadn’t also come across another woman, lying in a heap a few yards from the path, screaming in agony for help […]]]>

A woman carrying a backpack looks distressed in front of a grassy hill in a narrow horror stock footage.

A backpack A woman trudges through what looks like a sunburnt field of grass, fiddling with a bottle of water that contains only a few drops. Things would only seem slightly serious if she hadn’t also come across another woman, lying in a heap a few yards from the path, screaming in agony for help – and with a look of steel on her face, she walked past. Then we notice the path she walks is marked with gravel and is barely a foot wide, and we can immediately guess that she has no intention of straying from it, for no reason.

But why? What’s outside? Who made the way and where does it lead? Just enough information is revealed in Narrow, A short movie by screenwriter, director and lead actress Anna Chazelle. Shared by Short of the week, it unfolds 10 incredibly tense minutes as we follow the protagonist through a landscape where a misstep is synonymous with unspeakable misfortune.

After the screaming woman at first, the cruel temptations only increase from there – oh, the box of food the makeshift juuuust lasso won’t reach – and soon turn into psychological terrors so terrible you can understand. why the hiker decides to do it. what she does. We never get the chance to find out what’s following her in her every move – or any idea what she wants, or what kind of apocalyptic event has given her so much power. But as Chazelle tells Short of the Week, that’s kind of the point: “For me, horror clarifies what is really important in our lives by removing the superfluous. I love stories with simple but imaginative premises that are approached in an authentic and grounded way. I particularly liked the idea of ​​playing with sound, I am always particularly impressed by films, especially horror, which are not afraid of silence.


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Writer Forhad Khan has passed away https://fcacleveland.org/writer-forhad-khan-has-passed-away/ https://fcacleveland.org/writer-forhad-khan-has-passed-away/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 17:17:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/writer-forhad-khan-has-passed-away/ Forhad Khan Writer and former director of Bangla Academy Forhad Khan died while undergoing treatment for Covid-19 at a hospital in the capital in the wee hours of Friday. He was 77 years old. Bangla Academy’s deputy manuscript editor Quazi Jahidul Haque told New Age that Forhad Khan died while undergoing treatment at Dhaka Medical […]]]>

Forhad Khan

Writer and former director of Bangla Academy Forhad Khan died while undergoing treatment for Covid-19 at a hospital in the capital in the wee hours of Friday. He was 77 years old.

Bangla Academy’s deputy manuscript editor Quazi Jahidul Haque told New Age that Forhad Khan died while undergoing treatment at Dhaka Medical College around 4 a.m.

“Forhad Khan was admitted to hospital after testing positive for Covid-19 a week ago. In addition, he had suffered from cancer for a long time, ”Quazi Jahidul Haque told New Age.

“His namaz-e-janaza was held at Jannatul Maowa cemetery in Mirpur 11, where he was buried at 10:30 am,” Quazi Jahidul Haque added.

Bangla Academy Director General, poet Mohammad Nurul Huda and Bangla Academy Director Jalal Ahmed, among others, attended Forhad Khan’s namaz-e-janaza.

Peers and admirers expressed deep shock at the death of Forhad Khan and recalled his contribution to Bengali language and literature.

Essayist and translator Suresh Ranjan Basak said: “The death of Forhad Khan was a big shock to me. When I think of Forhad Khan, I imagine a tall, fair-skinned, well-built man with a soft voice and a smile, with a strong personality and perfect pronunciation of Bengali.

“As my intimacy with him grew during his long days at Bangla Academy, I came to know the extent of his knowledge of language and literature, not to mention his love for them. of them. He had a spell around him; he attracted people effortlessly. Besides his long service in various capacities at Bangla Academy, he was a leading writer, a writer to be reckoned with, “added Suresh Ranjan Basak, who also mentioned:” I feel lucky that, while he was director of the manuscripts and translation division of the academy, he took the initiative to publish two of my books.

Today my heart cries for him and my soul prays for his soul. That his soul rests in peace.

Writer Abedin Quader said: “Forhad Khan’s real name was Abdur Rab Khan, but he used the writing under the pseudonym Forhad Khan. I had a good relationship with Forhad Khan in the 1970s. ‘

“I have rarely seen a person as friendly and calm as Forhad Khan. During his student life, he read the news on Rajshahi radio station. After arriving in Dhaka, he continued to host programs broadcast on radio and television. He had excellent voice, pronunciation and literary acumen. In my memoir named Adda, I wrote about it. I was deeply saddened by his death.

Forhad Khan was born in Amla in Kushtia on December 23, 1944. He studied Bangla at Rajshahi University. He started his career at Kumarkhali College in Kushtia in 1970.

He joined Bangla Academy in 1973. He retired from Bangla Academy as Director in 2002.

Besides writing, he also anchored programs on television.

Forhad Khan’s works include Pratichya Puran, Bangla Shabder Utsa Abhidhan, Chitra o Bichitra, Hariye Jaowa Harapher Kahini, Shabder Chalchitra, Nil Bidroho, Bangalir Bibidh Bilas.

For his contribution to the Bangla essay, he was awarded the Mohammad Barkatullah Prabandha Sahitya Puraskar Prize in 2019.

He is survived by his son and daughter.


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