Writer – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 02:52:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Writer – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 Five Strategies for Overcoming Writer’s Block https://fcacleveland.org/five-strategies-for-overcoming-writers-block/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 20:02:30 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/five-strategies-for-overcoming-writers-block/ Writer’s block – defined by Merriam-Webster as “a psychological inhibition preventing a writer from continuing with an article” – is a serious source of anxiety that even the best writers struggle with. As a student taking classes on very different subjects, it’s normal to feel like some essays are just dripping from your fingertips on […]]]>

Writer’s block – defined by Merriam-Webster as “a psychological inhibition preventing a writer from continuing with an article” – is a serious source of anxiety that even the best writers struggle with. As a student taking classes on very different subjects, it’s normal to feel like some essays are just dripping from your fingertips on your keyboard while others seem impossible to begin with. Developing a repertoire of tools to bring to any essay can break the cycle of writer’s block and help you meet deadlines. The article presents a non-exhaustive list of strategies that may work for you.

  1. Set a timer for 20-30 minutes and write down whatever pops into your head

The fear of the blank page is real. For those with perfectionist tendencies, nothing you write in your first draft will ever be good enough for you. But it is important and healthy in the early stages of writing your essay to turn off your inner editor. An exercise like this can help you overcome the initial challenge of getting something or anything on a page without forcing yourself to write perfectly. This pre-writing may or may not end up in the essay itself, but it’s a great strategy to get your brain into essay-writing mode and start generating ideas.

  1. Take intentional breaks

Staring at a computer screen and waiting for a phrase or idea to magically appear isn’t necessarily helpful. Pausing intentionally to do a quick activity — go for a walk, listen to music, or do some housework — can rest your brain, and it can give you a better perspective on the complex issue you’re pondering.

  1. Explain your paper idea to a friend

The purpose of writing an essay is to communicate a complex idea to another person in an digestible way. The best way to see where you have gaps in your thinking or where your argument becomes dense and takes longer to explain is to talk it over with another person. This friend can help you with this process by asking clarifying questions and can also give you other types of helpful feedback.

4. Use campus resources

If you feel stuck at any stage of your writing, don’t be afraid to visit your school’s writing center or your teacher’s office hours. There is no shame in asking for help and taking advantage of the resources that are available to you. These resources are there because students need them and they can be very helpful. Attending your teacher’s office hours, if offered, is particularly beneficial. By talking directly to your professor, they can clarify the prompt or their expectations of you, and the professor often gives you specific advice on where your essay is going based on your conversation. Most professors will recognize that you took the time to meet, which demonstrates a commitment to passing the course and the assignment, and this can reflect positively in your final grade. Office hours are also an opportunity for your professor to get to know you as a person rather than just name and face in a large classroom, which can become a crucial academic and professional relationship.

5. Find a reason to write

Sometimes writer’s block stems from feeling that a particular writing task is completely unnecessary. A ten-page article on Dostoyevsky Crime and Punishment can seem tedious, but finding a reason to enjoy the writing process can help. The ability to write and communicate with strangers remotely, write in different modes, and adapt your argument to move an audience is a powerful skill. Strong writing skills can help you organize your thoughts and feelings, stand up for yourself and your community, or land and succeed in a job. Reframe your thinking about the skills you can learn by writing about topics that don’t necessarily match your interests (or, better yet, learning to write about a boring topic in a way that makes it relevant and interesting), and you may find renewed motivation.

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Local writer and artist wins Honeybee Creative Nonfiction Award / iBerkshires.com https://fcacleveland.org/local-writer-and-artist-wins-honeybee-creative-nonfiction-award-iberkshires-com/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 14:31:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/local-writer-and-artist-wins-honeybee-creative-nonfiction-award-iberkshires-com/ Suzi Banks Baum GREAT BARRINGTON, Mass. — An essay by a local writer and artist Suzi Banks Baum won The Good Life Review’s Honeybee Creative Nonfiction Award. Baum’s winning essay, “Connect: Disconnect,” was inspired by Merritt Tierce’s New York Times Magazine cover story titled “The Abortion I Didn’t Have.” Baum’s essay looks […]]]>
Suzi Banks Baum

GREAT BARRINGTON, Mass. — An essay by a local writer and artist Suzi Banks Baum won The Good Life Review’s Honeybee Creative Nonfiction Award.

Baum’s winning essay, “Connect: Disconnect,” was inspired by Merritt Tierce’s New York Times Magazine cover story titled “The Abortion I Didn’t Have.” Baum’s essay looks at teenage life, sexual exploration, gender identity, confusion, and nurturing or lack thereof in 1970s Midwestern American culture.

In addition to the Nebraska Publication Award, Baum received a Nebraska Honey Pot. However, the award-winning review says the essay is more salty than sweet. Contest judge Jessica Hendry Nelson wrote:

“‘Connect: Disconnect’ strikes me with its unapologetic exploration of the power and pleasure of female sexuality. With careful attention to language and pacing, it combs through memory to unpack a complicated legacy of desire and of wonder. This essay does not flinch, capitulate, or tone down. By tracing his voraciousness, the narrator reminds the reader of the vital power of his own.

This is the second award Baum has won, both for excerpts from his memoirs in progress. She is a book writer and artist, and a teacher with a distinctive female-centered focus for her signature teachings. She travels to Gyumri, Armenia, to teach book arts to women artists.

Her book “An Anthology of Babes” gives voice to 36 artist mothers. His work has been published in the literary magazine Kerning (2021), “The Collection: Flash Fiction for Flash Memory” by Anchala Studios and the Walloon Writers Review. His piece “Shoal” won third prize in Hypertext Literary Magazine’s Doro Böhme Memorial Competition in 2021. His mixed media work appears in Storey Publications’ 2022 release, “Collage Your Life!” by Melanie Mowinski. In addition to her winning essay from her ongoing memoir, her art work has been featured in The Guild of Book Workers Journal and Mingle Magazine.

For the past year, Baum has been teaching online and in person in his backyard in Great Barrington and at the Snowfarm Craft Program in Williamsburg. She will lead a two-day Book Art Workshop at the Columbia County School of Art (New York) September 17-18. The coming year includes its flagship offering of “Advent Dark Journal,” a six-week immersion in creative practice that begins in late November and ends in early January.

Berkshire residents will have the opportunity to view Suzi’s work in person at her first open studio event at her garage studio at 39 Hollenbeck Avenue in Great Barrington, MA from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on October 9th. The day includes a demonstration of eco-dye paper and other art books. His artist’s books will be on display, along with a selection of hand-bound books and his own decorative papers for sale. More information about Suzi’s work, classes and workshops can be learned on her website, suzibanksbaum.com


Key words: awards, local art,

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Writer Barbara Ehrenreich served on the board of NORML, “Loved Marijuana” https://fcacleveland.org/writer-barbara-ehrenreich-served-on-the-board-of-norml-loved-marijuana/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 13:06:07 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/writer-barbara-ehrenreich-served-on-the-board-of-norml-loved-marijuana/ This Barbara Ehrenreich quote from “Nickel and Dimes” appeared on a California NORML chart in 2014. Author, essayist and social critic Barbara Ehrenreich was also a marijuana legalization advocate who remained on the NORML advisory board until she died aged 81 on September 1 in Alexandria, Virginia, after suffering a stroke. Founder and Legal Advisor […]]]>
This Barbara Ehrenreich quote from “Nickel and Dimes” appeared on a California NORML chart in 2014.

Author, essayist and social critic Barbara Ehrenreich was also a marijuana legalization advocate who remained on the NORML advisory board until she died aged 81 on September 1 in Alexandria, Virginia, after suffering a stroke.

Founder and Legal Advisor of NORML Keith Strup told CelebStoner:

“WWe all loved Barbara and enjoyed our time with her at NORML board meetings. She was a fantastic, brilliant person and one of many exceptional people who Dr Lester Grinspoon brought into the organization when he reorganized the board in 1995–96. She was without a doubt one of the most important authors and activists I have ever known, and I am honored to have spent many years with her on the NORML Board of Directors. He was an exceptional person who loved marijuana.”

Deputy Director of NORML Paul Armentano added: “At a time when few cultural influencers were willing to speak publicly about the injustices of cannabis prohibition in America, Barbara Ehrenreich was an exception.”

Born in Montana in 1941, Ehrenreich attended Reed College in Oregon before moving to New York where she met her first husband working in the anti-war movement. Ehrenreich has established herself as a feminist voice with books like Witches, Midwives and Nurses: A History of Women Healers (1972) and Women in the Global Factory (1983).

Keith Stroup on Barbara Ehrenreich: “She was an exceptional person who loved marijuana.”

For Nickel and Dimed: We (don’t) get by in America (2001), she took blue-collar jobs and concluded that the pay was not enough for many Americans. The same year his Harper article “Welcome to Cancerland“, received a National Magazine Award. She followed this with the book Bright Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America and the equally ascerbic article “Smile! you have cancer” in 2010 in which she derided ” ta cheerfulness of breast cancer culture. Ehrenreich herself was diagnosed with breast cancer In 2000.

She wrote in Nickel and Dimed: “It is disturbing on a deep personal and physical level to know that the many the engaging qualities I think I have to offer – friendliness, reliability, willingness to learn – can all be overshadowed by my pee.

California NORML Deputy Director Ellen Komp noted in a comment on facebook: “She died shortly after the California legislature voted to ban workplace discrimination based on urine testing.”

Here are some tweets:

Become a patron!

Steve Bloom

Steve Bloom

Publisher of CelebStoner.com, former editor of High Times and Freedom Leaf and co-author of Pot Culture and Reefer Movie Madness.

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Ashley Judd A powerful piece written by a writer. “the right to keep” Private Bread https://fcacleveland.org/ashley-judd-a-powerful-piece-written-by-a-writer-the-right-to-keep-private-bread/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 19:36:48 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/ashley-judd-a-powerful-piece-written-by-a-writer-the-right-to-keep-private-bread/ “My beloved mother, Naomi Judd, who had come to believe that her mental illness would only get worse, never better, committed suicide that day. The trauma of discovering and then holding her body in work haunts my nights,” Judd writes. “As my family and I continue to mourn our loss, the rampant and cruel misinformation […]]]>

“My beloved mother, Naomi Judd, who had come to believe that her mental illness would only get worse, never better, committed suicide that day. The trauma of discovering and then holding her body in work haunts my nights,” Judd writes. “As my family and I continue to mourn our loss, the rampant and cruel misinformation that has spread about her death and our relationship with her stalks my days.

“The horror will only get worse if the details surrounding his death are released by Tennessee law which generally permits the release of police reports, including family interviews, of closed investigations,” she continues.

Judd She She remembers being interviewed the day her mother died.

“I never thought to ask my own questions, including: Is your body camera turned on? Am I being audio recorded again? Where and how will what I share be stored, used, and updated? available to the public?” Judd writes.

“Family members who have lost a loved one are often re-victimized by laws that can expose their most private moments to the public,” she wrote. “Immediately after a heartbreaking tragedy, when we are in a state of acute shock, trauma, panic and distress, the authorities come forward to speak to us.

CNN reached out to the rep and discussed their concerns. Judd For a comment.

Representative from the Williamson County Sheriff’s Office in Tennessee Refer CNN to attorney Courtney King for comment.

“While we disagree with certain statements made in Ms. Judd’s essay, we do not discuss issues that are the subject of ongoing litigation,” the attorney for KingAn Williamson County told CNN .

Judd She She writes that her family has filed an objection to the release of her mother’s murder investigation files. “deep sympathy for Vanessa Bryant and all the families who have had to endure the anguish of a legal leak or public disclosure of the most intimate and raw details surrounding a death.

She’s We Now, they call on lawmakers to intervene.

“I hope that leaders in Washington and state capitals will provide basic protections for those involved in the police response to mental health emergencies,” she wrote. “These emergencies are tragedies, not water for public spectacle.”

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French police interrogate disgraced writer over rape allegations – Expat Guide to France https://fcacleveland.org/french-police-interrogate-disgraced-writer-over-rape-allegations-expat-guide-to-france/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 04:26:33 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/french-police-interrogate-disgraced-writer-over-rape-allegations-expat-guide-to-france/ French writer Gabriel Matzneff, accused of raping underage girls when he was one of Paris’s most acclaimed literary figures, was questioned by police on Wednesday as part of an investigation opened after the publication of an explosive book, judicial sources said. Matzneff, now 86, had made no secret of his preference for pedophilia before Vanessa […]]]>

French writer Gabriel Matzneff, accused of raping underage girls when he was one of Paris’s most acclaimed literary figures, was questioned by police on Wednesday as part of an investigation opened after the publication of an explosive book, judicial sources said.

Matzneff, now 86, had made no secret of his preference for pedophilia before Vanessa Springora, now a prominent publisher, described being groomed by him at the age of 14 in an expose believed to be a turning point in the French #MeToo movement denouncing sexual abuse by men. .

The revelations prompted two other women to come forward to say they too had been abused by him as teenagers.

Matzneff’s lawyer declined to comment on the interrogation, which was confirmed by the Paris prosecutor’s office, which opened its investigation the day after the publication of Springora’s “Consent” book in early 2020.

But sources familiar with the investigation told AFP that due to statute of limitations it is likely to be closed without charge, making it unlikely that Matzneff will stand trial.

Over the years, he has spoken extensively on TV shows and written about his predilection for teenagers. In the mid-1970s, he published a notorious essay titled “The Under Sixteen”.

But Springora was the first person to record to describe her experiences with him.

The scandal was one of the turning points of the #MeToo movement in France, after decades of people turning a blind eye to the columnist’s behavior despite his candor about his private life.

Shortly after Springora’s exposure, French publishers began pulling his books from stores, and he was deprived of thousands of euros in state writers’ aid as well as a subsidized apartment on the riverbank. chic left of the capital.

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American Poet Laureate and Sonoma Writer Ada Limón Talks Writing https://fcacleveland.org/american-poet-laureate-and-sonoma-writer-ada-limon-talks-writing/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 23:05:13 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/american-poet-laureate-and-sonoma-writer-ada-limon-talks-writing/ As the 24th Poet Laureate of the United States, Ada Limón is an ambassador in the world of beautiful words. His poems use clear, everyday language. But they have as much literary weight as accessibility. Limón has written half a dozen books of poetry, and his most recent work is “The hurtful kind.” She is […]]]>

As the 24th Poet Laureate of the United States, Ada Limón is an ambassador in the world of beautiful words. His poems use clear, everyday language. But they have as much literary weight as accessibility. Limón has written half a dozen books of poetry, and his most recent work is “The hurtful kind.” She is also the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry and numerous other accolades.

Limón was born in Sonoma County and now lives among the hills and horses of Kentucky. KQED forum host Alexis Madrigal spoke with Limón about his new Poet Laureate position and how to read a poem.

The following excerpts have been edited for length and clarity.

ALEXIS MADRIGAL: In a 2008 essay, you were living in New York and thinking about regional poetry and wondering if you were, in fact, a poet from Sonoma. And then you said, “I think I’d call myself a California poet. That definition is too strict and it smells like old wine.” Do you now see yourself as a Sonoma poet?

ADA LIMON: To be honest, I think the place I feel most at home is in Sonoma. It’s like a place where I belong deeply. But I also feel like there’s a part of me that now that I’ve lived in so many different places…I feel like there’s this kind of feeling that I belong to America. I think the landscape of the United States is something that I really feel connected to. And now that I’ve lived so many places there, I feel like I can talk about it. But, Sonoma still feels like home.

Do you feel that coming from these different places, living in these different places, the contrasts stand out more?

I think one of the things that I really love about being in different places, even while traveling, is this idea of ​​getting to know the natural elements of each place. When I came to Kentucky I really hoped to move back to California permanently, then I fell madly in love and married my husband and live in Kentucky and learned to love him.

But I think the way I know how to like something, or how I can understand it, is to explore the natural landscape around me. Many of the poems in the book are about me taking in the landscape around me and looking at the old barns and amazing horse pastures everywhere. It was important for me to understand – how to love a place, to name the plants and animals around me.

Let you read “A good story.” This is your most recent collection.

It’s a poem that started for me at a place where I feel like there were so many poems that dealt with trauma. And I think it’s extremely important that we write and read poems that are difficult and that deal with difficult things. But I also really wanted to write about tenderness and to be grateful for those moments when tenderness was offered to me. That’s where this poem comes from.

It reminded me of a time when my sister’s ex-husband silently made me a bowl of mac and cheese, while I cried in my sister’s lap. What is the literary infrastructure that makes this pack such a punch?

Thanks for that. The poem is in couplets and there are actually long lines in the poem that kind of allow it to move a bit faster.

The line length of a poem really determines the pace and speed of reading the poem. A shorter line is going to be a lot slower if you’re thinking of some sort of Emily Dickinson, it’s going to read a lot slower because there’s breath in it.

This slight pause after the line break will make you read more slowly, then a longer line will read a bit faster.

You can think of Whitman, then the mid-length line is more for conversation. You can think of Shakespeare. It’s supposed to be read a little fast, but at the same time it’s in couplets. So you’re going to pause after each of these verses, which gives you that little moment of pause.

It has this kind of rhythm that comes and goes.

The last line is then on its own, which kind of allows it to stand out a bit.

The other part of this poem is that it deals with time.

A student asked me, “How is it that you can jump from the present moment to the past or the future so easily in your poems?” And I said, well, this is going to sound weird, but I think time doesn’t exist. I say my stepfather told me a story. And then he does this thing. But at the same time, it feels like it’s happening in the moment because it starts with a hard day. And what does the hard day require? The tough day requires a good story and sometimes that good story isn’t something that’s happening right now. But maybe it’s a memory like you were talking about. The person who fed you macaroni and cheese.

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Legendary travel writer and editor Don George shares his secrets https://fcacleveland.org/legendary-travel-writer-and-editor-don-george-shares-his-secrets/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 11:32:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/legendary-travel-writer-and-editor-don-george-shares-his-secrets/ Many of the world’s top writers, editors, publishers and travel photographers landed at Corte Madera this week, for the annual Don George Book Passage Conference of Travel Writers and Photographers. The event was started “on a whim” in 1992: Book Passage owner Elaine Petrocelli called and said they should organize a multi-day conference for travel […]]]>

Many of the world’s top writers, editors, publishers and travel photographers landed at Corte Madera this week, for the annual Don George Book Passage Conference of Travel Writers and Photographers. The event was started “on a whim” in 1992: Book Passage owner Elaine Petrocelli called and said they should organize a multi-day conference for travel writers at the bookstore, George said yes and invited journalist and travel writer Jan Morris (“one of the greatest human beings of all time”) to be their guest of honor.

Now in its 30th year and still at the beloved Bay Area bookstore, mornings are all about workshops, with afternoon panels covering everything from social media to finding your story in the field. Basically everything you need to know to be a travel writer or photographer.

“I’m proud that the conference has continued and grown into what it is today — it’s been one of the highlights of my year,” says George, who lives just across the bay in the small town of Piedmont. During the conference, he also answers questions about how to get started, what makes a good travelogue, and working with publishers and travel industry professionals.

Travel writing was once a very different world, with hopeful queries to magazine editors typed and mailed. George’s Breakthrough, an essay on the ascent of Mount Kilimanjaro, has landed pride of place in the pages of Miss magazine thanks to such a missive. He kicked off a career that spanned four decades, including travel editor roles at San Francisco Chronicle, Salon and Lonely Planet. He has also written several books, including Lonely Planet’s no longer sold Travel Writing Guide, and has received countless literary accolades, including the Lowell Thomas Travel Journalist of the Year award from the Society of American Travel Writers.

“I feel incredibly blessed because it was such a crazy combination of serendipity that started my career,” George says. “I loved writing poetry in high school and went to Princeton where I majored in English Literature and minored in Creative Writing. After graduation I went to Europe for a year and did an internship at Paris It was there that I fell in love with the world and realized that the class I wanted to be in was not an ivy-covered class as a tweed English teacher.

Still editor for National Geographic Travel and is currently working on a second anthology of his best travel articles, a sequel to The Way of Wanderlust: Don George’s Best TravelogueHere, “The Gift of Travel Writing” shares some industry tips and insights.

What does your pre-conference course look like, all day in the field?

“We meet at Passage of the book and taking a ferry to San Francisco, where I talk about some of the tips and secrets I’ve learned over the years, and how to improve writing as a writer and editor. As we walk from the Ferry Building to the North Beach neighborhood, I asked the writers to search for a story about the city and clues that reveal the essence of the story. They are detectives, but what mystery are they trying to solve? Another task I set for them after lunch is to locate themselves somewhere and write a description using all of their senses. People are very good at writing about what they see, but they’re usually not so good at writing about what they smell, hear, taste, or touch. We tend to forget about all those other senses, so the idea is to get people to pay attention and honor them as well.

Biggest takeaways you learned early in your career?

“Don’t compromise: follow your dream. Find a way to make that dream come true. Make your own luck. Don’t be afraid to say yes.

Common mistakes writers make and how can they successfully land assignments?

“Not studying the publication they want to write for closely enough and confusing a destination with a story. If they write me a question saying: “I’m going to Italy”. Do you want a story? My answer will be: “Italy is not a story. What about the Italy you want to write about? When I lead workshops, I present my point of view as an editor and what I’m looking for in a story. Often writers don’t understand the purpose of their stories. It’s often “this is what I did” or “this is what happened to me”. I try to get them to think about what they want the reader to take away.

How do you shape a story for maximum effect?

“Good writing should make the reader’s journey easier and not allow them to get lost along the way. Put the verbs correctly. Get rid of adjectives. If you have a noun that will do the job of an adjective, get rid of the adjectives and make every word count.

What’s the future of beautifully written travel prose in the video-dominated world of social media?

“Travel publishing has evolved so much that it was like watching an earthquake with the landscape totally rearranged afterwards. When I started, there were about 15 publications in the United States that you could write for, and you either got published there or you didn’t, and that’s how your career progressed. Now it’s exploded into this exciting but overwhelming realm where everyone can be their own editor. One thing to remember is the principle of doing justice and honoring your subject and yourself as the creator. Honor your audience and do the best you can, whatever medium you choose. Make sure you’re delivering the right message in the most effective and evocative way possible, whether that’s with a two-minute video or a 2,500-word story.

Can you sum up what it’s like to be a travel writer in ten words?

1. “Explore the world with all your heart/with your mind; share what you learned and liked.

2. “Blessed life studying/sharing in the classroom of the world.”

Is it still possible to make a living as a travel writer today?

“It has always been difficult to make a living as a travel writer, and it remains so today. The best way is to geographically and stylistically expand your professional portfolio (words, photos, video storytelling) and cultivate personal relationships with publishers and producers by attending workshops and conferences.

How do you think the pandemic has impacted travel writing and travel?

“It shattered people’s travel dreams. For two years we were all sitting rather than wandering around the world. Travel agencies, hotels and tour operators have been hit hard. Financially, it’s still something people are trying to recover from. But I think the positive is that we’ve come to appreciate the value of travel and travel in our lives. We appreciate the fragility and interconnectedness of the planet in a whole new way. Our role as stewards and what we need to do to preserve and retain all of these incredibly wonderful things that we once took for granted.

What can you share about your writers’ workshops in Paris next summer?

“Another positive aspect of the pandemic is that it taught us if we had a dream to go there. I always wanted to organize a writing workshop in Paris and said that I would organize one this summer. I just did it, and it was wonderful, so I’ll be holding two there next July. I took a big apartment on Île Saint-Louis, one of my favorite places. The workshops will take place from the apartment, but we will walk around the city and do different writing exercises. The idea is that everyone finds their point of passion in Paris, something that really speaks to them, on which they will write an essay entitled “My Personal Paris”.

Your takeaway for budding travel writers?

“Become the editor of the publication you want to write for. Understand how they choose the stories they publish. Every editor has a picture puzzle of stories in their mind; understand where your story fits into that puzzle.

The Don George Writers’ Workshops in Paris run July 6-11 and July 16-21, 2023, with groups limited to nine writers per workshop. www.don-george.com.

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Ian Hickey and Caroline Magennis share the literary prize; writer wanted for residency in Krakow – The Irish Times https://fcacleveland.org/ian-hickey-and-caroline-magennis-share-the-literary-prize-writer-wanted-for-residency-in-krakow-the-irish-times/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 12:46:33 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/ian-hickey-and-caroline-magennis-share-the-literary-prize-writer-wanted-for-residency-in-krakow-the-irish-times/ In this Saturday’s Irish Times, Donal Ryan takes Roisin Ingle on a tour of his native Tipperarey to discuss his latest novel, The Queen of Dirt Island. Kit de Waal talks to Seamás O’Reilly about his childhood memoirs, Without Warning and Only Sometimes: Scenes from an Unpredictable Childhood. Reviews are Ian Duhig on Without Warning […]]]>

In this Saturday’s Irish Times, Donal Ryan takes Roisin Ingle on a tour of his native Tipperarey to discuss his latest novel, The Queen of Dirt Island. Kit de Waal talks to Seamás O’Reilly about his childhood memoirs, Without Warning and Only Sometimes: Scenes from an Unpredictable Childhood.

Reviews are Ian Duhig on Without Warning and Only Sometimes by Kit de Waal; John Self on The Queen of Dirt Island by Donald Ryan; Declan Hughes on Best New Crime Fiction; Una Mannion on Tess Gunty’s Hutch; Keith Duggan on Two Brothers: the Life and Times of Bobby and Jack Charlton by Jonathan Wilson; Roisin Kiberd on Anne Weber’s Epic Annette: A Heroine’s Tale, tr. Tess Lewis; NJ McGarrigle on Rich Hall’s Nailing it; Rory Kiberd on The Last White Man by Mohsin Hamid; Eilis Ni Dhuibhne on The Swimmers by Chloe Lane; and Sarah Gilmartin on Haven by Emma Donoghue.

Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney is this weekend’s Irish Times Eason deal, just €4.99, a saving of €5, when buying a newspaper.

The British Association of Contemporary Literary Studies has awarded its annual monograph prize jointly to Ian Hickey for Haunted Heaney: Specters and the Poetry (London: Routledge, 2021) and Caroline Magennis for Northern Irish Writing after the Troubles (London: Bloomsbury, 2021) .

The judges said of Haunted Heaney: “This book is rigorous, sensitive, written with clarity, and demonstrates a passion for Heaney’s work that is compelling. The readings were vigorous and revealing throughout and offer an original approach to the work.

The quote from Northern Irish Writing after the Troubles read: “It’s clear from the start that you’re in the hands of an expert reader, but also someone who loves these books and can take you deep into the emotions they convey. There’s plenty here for readers who are completely new to the authors represented here as well as those who are already familiar with some of the texts under consideration.

The BACLS Postgraduate Essay Prize was awarded to Katie Harling-Lee for Caught in the Regime: Classical Music and the Individual in the Contemporary Novel (Open Humanities Library 7:2 (2021))

The Heaney-Miłosz Residence, a new literary residency program has been launched in Krakow, Poland by the Estate of Seamus Heaney, the Irish Embassy in Poland and the Krakow Festival Office (KBF). This residency will take place for four to six weeks in the fall of 2023 in the former apartment of one of Poland’s most renowned writers and Nobel laureate, Czesław Miłosz, in Krakow.

The residency aims to celebrate the friendship between Seamus Heaney and Czesław Miłosz, providing the time and space needed for an early or mid-career writer based in Ireland to develop their writing. The call for applications and the application file are available on Literaryresidenciespoland.pl. Applications are open until On September 30, the selected author will be announced in December.

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The Kennedy Summer School will explore the life of Bridget Murphy, President John F. Kennedy’s great-grandmother and the woman behind the family’s turnaround in the United States.

Bridget emigrated from Wexford, escaping the ravages of the Famine. There she met fellow Wexfordman Patrick Kennedy. In 1849 they were married, but just nine years later he died, leaving Bridget alone to raise their four children.

In a new book, The First Kennedys, American author Neal Thompson explores Bridget’s often overlooked story. Neal says, “I consider her the forgotten hero of this family and its history. Everything about the legend of this family has been so male-centric. But when you kind of go back to where it all started, it really started with this tenacious, widowed, enterprising woman, Bridget.

Thompson will join Kennedy Summer School in New Ross Sept. 8-10. See kennedysummerschool.ie for details and tickets.

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The Most Natural Thing in the World by Hennessy Literary Prize-winning short story writer Desmond Traynor, which he describes as a meditation on childlessness and childless existence and a kind of pro vita sua apology, is launched this month by Beir Bua Presse. Éilís Ní Dhuibhne called it “a very original essay by a master stylist. With brutal honesty, Desmond Traynor weaves the gripping story of his personal experience with philosophical reflections on the ethics of reproduction. Provocative, deep and ultimately very balanced. Rob Doyle described it as “an in-depth, personal, sometimes startlingly candid examination of perhaps the most fundamental decision a human being will ever make: whether or not to beget new life”.

The Last of the Light by Marc Ó Riain is a newly published collection of short stories, memories and images, capturing the essence of Loop Head Peninsula, Co Clare. The stories capture the endless play of light on the surrounding Atlantic – its birds, its fish, its moods and its power, all made from the lived experience of the region and drawn from the shadowy areas of memory. It is also a testimony to the bond of brotherhood – beneath the writing flows a submerged narrative: the loss of an absent brother, whose light, according to the author, originally from Kilkee, still lingers. A book that strongly evokes the connection between the person and the place and the place. 30 € from bairneachpublications.com

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The Irish Writers Center will open its doors for a Fall Open Day on Saturday, August 27 to inform those interested in writing about the variety of services, courses, and resources available at the organization. Powered by a new five-year strategythe center plans to improve opportunities for people from all communities to explore and participate in creative writing.

From 10:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., the day will feature a series of events, including open invitations to join the Inkslingers and New Irish Communities writing groups, a series of free workshops, a panel discussion on how “Place shapes us as writers”, an information session on the Salon du roman writing competition and much more. There will also be plenty of opportunities to meet and chat with other like-minded people who are interested in books and writing. Register for the Fall Open House.

Books by Colomba published a new book by veteran journalist Mary Kenny. The way we were: Catholic Ireland since 1922 looks at the social and personal history of Ireland since the formation of the Irish state in 1922, with a focus on the Catholic identity of Irish culture. The book is a comprehensive social history with a perspective on the context and social changes compared elsewhere.

On September 7, Mary Kenny will be in conversation with Derek Scally, Irish Times journalist and author of The best Catholics in the worldon the theme of Catholic Ireland: A proud heritage or a shameful debacle?, hosted by RTÉ Radio 1 broadcaster Sean O’Rourke. The event will take place at Hodges Figgis on Dawson Street at 6 p.m. On September 15, Kenny will launch his book in the presence of Sabina Coyne Higgins at the United Arts Club, Fitzwilliam St. Upper at 6:30 p.m.

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Audiobooks remain the fastest growing publishing industry, with the Audio Publishers Association reporting another 25% expansion this year. Far from cannibalizing print sales, research suggests that audiobooks are contributing to the growth of the overall book market. The image, however, is not good news. Many small independent presses publishing literary fiction and non-fiction are often excluded from this growing market, given the added costs of production and marketing, and the transactional algorithm-based market style of the dominant Audible. from Amazon (which may offer you an audiobook as a reward for buying a hedge trimmer).

A new independent company, Spiracle, challenges this status quo, providing a curated platform for modern and contemporary literary titles. Far from algorithms, bestsellers and self-help titles, this platform aims to be a haven for book lovers. The curated offer is like having a trusted friend recommend surprising and inspiring audiobooks to you every month, quite different from the narrow, predictable algorithmic suggestions based on past choices.

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puzzling story of an Indian writer in Berlin https://fcacleveland.org/puzzling-story-of-an-indian-writer-in-berlin/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/puzzling-story-of-an-indian-writer-in-berlin/ The most difficult question raised by modernism is what it is to have a taste for the fabric. What are you looking for when you line up with a thousand other punters for an exhibition of doodles by Picasso or a new production by Lulu? How sincere is a person who claims to have been […]]]>

The most difficult question raised by modernism is what it is to have a taste for the fabric. What are you looking for when you line up with a thousand other punters for an exhibition of doodles by Picasso or a new production by Lulu? How sincere is a person who claims to have been amused and moved by Odysseus?

A plausible hypothesis is that to love modernism is to love being perplexed most of the time. Indian writer and musician Amit Chaudhuri is one of the most eloquent contemporary champions of modernism. In his last work of non-fiction, a refreshing and upsetting essay on Indian classical music, Finding the Raga, he offered a very illuminating and concise definition: modernism, he wrote, was “the destruction of recognizability”.

So far, much of his fiction has sought to at least maintain the illusion of recognizability. His early short stories, elegant studies of bourgeois life in Calcutta, were hailed by Hilary Mantel as “masterpieces of intimate observation.” Read in the light of his most recent writings, they turn out to be stranger and riskier than their description makes them sound. In their obsession with “moments” rather than narratives, and their renunciation of most of the characteristic pleasures of the novel (plot, event), they risked leaving most readers bored or mystified.

In Chaudhuri’s recent fiction, the experiments have become riskier. In Ulysses Abroad, a very funny book consciously playing with Homer and Joyce, a Bengali student in London walks with an eccentric uncle. Little happens, but much is observed, much felt. In his latest novel, Friend of My Youth, a character called “Amit Chaudhuri” declares himself a false novelist, a traitor to his chosen form: “when I can, [I] undermine the genre that – or for which I work”. The process continues with his new short story, Sojourn. But the new book is considerably – and most likely deliberately – more obscure than anything Chaudhuri has written before.

A middle-aged Indian writer arrived in Berlin in the fall of 2005 to take up a visiting professorship. He hardly speaks German. The city, loaded with a history that he only half understands, disconcerts him. It is taken up by a poet, an atheist in exile from the Islamists in his native Bangladesh. He begins something that isn’t quite an affair with a breathless indophile, Birgit, despite her neurotic distrust of “Europeans who ‘love’ India.”

Chaudhuri’s narrator is obsessed with his apartment’s toilet, “mostly a slab, like a dissecting table”, on which the apartment’s previous occupant, Japanese Nobel laureate Kenzaburo Oe, had to sit. He is on the lookout, vigilant: he perceives the “fineness” of Pakistani migrants, the “stealth” of the women who solicit at the entrances of the U-Bahn, and the “pain” emanating from the local trains. He tries out new identities, eating Turkish rice pudding despite not liking it: “Berlin gives me the right to experiment.” The German words – “’schön’, ‘ach so’, ‘danke’” begin to sound to him “exactly like Bengali”.

Chaudhuri has written in the past about his admiration for Christopher Isherwood’s style Goodbye to Berlin, “its deceptive transparency, its constant and discreet melody”. Isherwood achieves its effect, Chaudhuri surmises, by never once explaining the reason his narrator is in Berlin: his sexual interest in working-class men. What is left out – what must be left out – makes what remains urgent, tense, alive.

I suspect Chaudhuri is striving for something similar here. There’s something just a tiny bit weird, or quirky, about its narrator, but I had a hard time figuring out what. Little about his quirk is recognizable.

His narrator has a family, possibly in India, but they are not with him, a fact he describes, in a peculiar turn of phrase, as “a godsend”. But the absence of a family never pushes him to productivity. Any human contact only seems to lead him deeper into his own increasingly fragmented mind, a fragmentation that reflects the characteristics of the ever-divided city whose streets he wanders.

I found the effect of all the obliquity and suggestion disconcerting, as Chaudhuri no doubt intended. The elegant suggestiveness of the writing, its intelligence and perspicacity, encourage you to turn the pages. But a reader will have to enjoy, or at least be comfortable with, being perplexed.


Stay is published by at £14.99. To order your copy for £12.99, call 0844 871 1514 or visit Telegraph Books

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Who is Salman Rushdie and what did he write about BiH? https://fcacleveland.org/who-is-salman-rushdie-and-what-did-he-write-about-bih/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 07:30:35 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/who-is-salman-rushdie-and-what-did-he-write-about-bih/ Indian-born writer Ahmed Salman Rushdie was injured in the attack 2 days ago in New York and is in extremely serious condition health. Who is Salman Rushdie Indian writer Salman Rushdie was born in 1947 in Bombay, when India was ruled by the British. crown. As the child of a lawyer and a teacher, Rushdie […]]]>

Indian-born writer Ahmed Salman Rushdie was injured in the attack 2 days ago in New York and is in extremely serious condition health.

Who is Salman Rushdie

Indian writer Salman Rushdie was born in 1947 in Bombay, when India was ruled by the British. crown. As the child of a lawyer and a teacher, Rushdie was educated in elite institutions before enrolling at King’s College, Cambridge, where he earned a degree in art history.

Rushdie published his first novel “Grimus” in 1975, but he wrote one of his most popular books a few years later, more precisely in 1981, when he presented himself to the public with the novel “Midnight’s Children “, for which he also won the Booker Prize.

However, none of Rushdie’s works has caused as much controversy as the one he wrote in 1988. During this period, Rushdie published “The Satanic Verses”, a work that many Muslims considered blasphemous and offensive. .

Bosnia in my head

While the story of Salman Rushdie gained global popularity through his controversial book, this Indian writer has become even closer to the people of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) through his 1994 essay entitled “Bosnia on my mind”. .

For me, the truth lies in the nature and significance of Sarajevo, where, as Susan Sontag said, the 20th century began and where it ends. I have never been to Sarajevo, but I feel like I belong there. I am proud to be an honorary member of the PEN club of the former Yugoslavia and I hope that I will not be considered presumptuous if I say that as a result of this new relationship, I am also in some way in exile of Sarajevo, even though it’s a city I don’t know,” he said.

At the end of his essay, Rushdie wrote that he watched a strange short film in which a man drives through the streets of Sarajevo and repeats the name “Salman Rushdie” like a mantra.

Does he sing it to remind him of danger, or as some kind of amulet to protect him? I hope it’s the latter. In the spirit of this beautiful magic, I also began to mumble the name of a city unknown to me, of which I declare myself a citizen. Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Sarajevo…”, is the conclusion of Rushdie’s essay, Klix.ba writing.

E.Dz

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