award winning – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 00:55:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png award winning – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 ‘Transcendent Kingdom’ author Yaa Gyasi as Schoenfeldt’s Emeritus Writer https://fcacleveland.org/transcendent-kingdom-author-yaa-gyasi-as-schoenfeldts-emeritus-writer/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 00:55:46 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/transcendent-kingdom-author-yaa-gyasi-as-schoenfeldts-emeritus-writer/ Ghanaian-American award-winning novelist Yaa Gyasi spoke to the UP community on Wednesday, March 10 at the Buckley Center Auditorium as Schoenfeldt’s Spring 2022 Writer Emeritus. This year’s ReadUP book, “Transcendent Kingdom” is Gyasi’s second novel in 2010, which explores Ghanaian immigrants struggling with tensions between science and faith, family and kinship, depression and grief. Yaa […]]]>

Ghanaian-American award-winning novelist Yaa Gyasi spoke to the UP community on Wednesday, March 10 at the Buckley Center Auditorium as Schoenfeldt’s Spring 2022 Writer Emeritus.

This year’s ReadUP book, “Transcendent Kingdom” is Gyasi’s second novel in 2010, which explores Ghanaian immigrants struggling with tensions between science and faith, family and kinship, depression and grief.

Yaa Gyasi’s latest novel, “Transcendent Kingdom”.

In a candid and heartwarming talk, Gyasi explored how her experience of becoming a writer was influenced by her culture and upbringing as she draws inspiration from Toni Morrison, Frederick Douglass, and Gabriel García Márquez.

Gyasi traveled to Ghana to do research for her novel, where she came across Cape Coast Castle. Uncovering its history – constructed by Sweden and later taken up by the Dutch and British – Gyasi was inspired by the stories told of death and crime covered within its walls.

On her travels to Ghana for her first novel

“When I first started thinking about ‘Homegoing’, my first novel, I was in my second year at university, desperate for mystery and magic. I applied and received a scholarship from the “Stanford University that would allow me to conduct research for a novel. I confess to all of you today that I had no idea what I got myself into. I was thinking, trying to find out, to put order in the meeting. From there, a world was flushed out before me.

“I saw the beginnings of what would become Homegoing, it was a seven-year journey from conception to publication, and it remains and always will be one of the most important research experiences of my life.”

“I knew that day at the castle that I wanted to write about this story. Over the seven years that I have worked, my project has grown and grown. I think partly because the more I wrote and studied the past, the more I cared about the present. The more I thought about the present, the more I began to see how tied it was to our past.

On his version of “Transcendent Kingdom” versus “Homegoing”

“My last novel, Transcendent Kingdom, was much more intimate. It’s a novel about the ghosts that haunt us and from which we inherit, those who haunt our paths. Our families. These novels are as different as two novels can be. [Homegoing] has 14 chapters about 14 different POV characters. It changes continents and centuries. By contrast, Transcendent Kingdom is a quieter, smaller book. For the most part a single continent.

Yaa Gyasi gives a Schoenfeldt Writers Series talk at Buckley Center Auditorium.

The science behind “Transcendent Kingdom”

“Years before I started working on it, I had written a short story when I was in college. I liked this story. But after posting it, I moved on. I spent years working on a book that didn’t work. Every time I sat down to write, I felt no spark, no joy. Around the same time, my childhood friend was completing a doctorate. in neuroscience.

To better understand his work, I asked if I could go watch him. She very kindly said yes. And that experience of watching her turned the wheels for me. I wondered if there was a way to relate the styles to the situation of the short story written years before.

On the power of literature

“[Toni Morrison] lives in the gift of her novels but also, just as importantly, she lives in all of us whose lives she has touched.

“It’s still the power of literature. Reading. It seems so trivial to pass your eyes over letters. They go together to form words and groups are put together to form sentences which come together to form paragraphs and so on. You finish the book, we put it away or return it to your local library. You sell it or give it away. Or London to a friend, never to see him again. And that seems to be it. A lifetime of that. But instead, a small miracle, the book ends but the words endure. Switching pages ships to you. The site of your own memories.

Janea Melido is a reporter for The Beacon. She can be reached at melido24@up.edu.

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Fisher family writer-in-residence Paisley Rekdal will read on March 17 https://fcacleveland.org/fisher-family-writer-in-residence-paisley-rekdal-will-read-on-march-17/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 02:16:26 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/fisher-family-writer-in-residence-paisley-rekdal-will-read-on-march-17/ UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Award-winning essayist and poet Paisley Rekdal will visit Penn State as the Fisher family’s writer-in-residence during the week of March 14-18. As part of his visit, Rekdal will give a free public reading at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 17 in the Paterno Library’s Foster Auditorium. The in-person event will also […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Award-winning essayist and poet Paisley Rekdal will visit Penn State as the Fisher family’s writer-in-residence during the week of March 14-18. As part of his visit, Rekdal will give a free public reading at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 17 in the Paterno Library’s Foster Auditorium.

The in-person event will also be available via livestream; those interested in participating virtually should register in advance.

Rekdal is the author of a book of essays, “The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee”; the hybrid genre photo-text memoir “Intimate”; the book-length essay “The Broken Country: “On Trauma, A Crime, and the Continuing Legacy of Vietnam”; and a book on cultural appropriation in literature titled “Appropriate: A Provocation” (WW Norton, 2021) also the author of six books of poetry: “A Crash of Rhinos”, “Six Girls Without Pants”, “The Invention of the Kaleidoscope”, “Animal Eye”, “Imaginary Vessels” and “Nightingale.

In “Appropriate: A Provocation,” Rekdal answers the question: “When is it culturally appropriate to creative writing? The Los Angeles Times describes the book and Rekdal’s treatment of this current and controversial issue this way: “Framed as a series of letters to a white college student, X, who wrote a poem partly in the voice of a older black person…Letters explores whether it is possible to write successfully across race, cases of racial imposters and intruders, the nature of whiteness, and much more…As a woman of mixed white and Chinese descent, Rekdal was both an outsider and an insider, knowing the other two. and privilege.

In “Nightingale”, Rekdal rewrites and modernizes many of the myths at the heart of Ovid’s epic, “The Metamorphoses”. Rekdal’s book won the Washington State Book Award and was named to the Washington Post’s “Best Poetry Collection” selection and NPR’s “Best of 2019” selection. The New York Journal of Books writes that the collection “explores what few writers since Ovid have reminded us: metamorphosis is a violent act, requiring dismemberment, silence, and fragmentation before it can become something new.”

A two-time finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Prize, her work has received the Amy Lowell Poetry Travel Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an NEA Fellowship, Pushcart Awards, the Academy of American Poets Poet Laureate Fellowship, and inclusion in five editions of the Best American Poetry Series. She edited the anthology “The Best American Poetry 2020”.

Rekdal’s poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in The New York Times Magazine, American Poetry Review, The Kenyon Review, Poetry, The New Republic, Virginia Quarterly Review, Tin House, and National Public Radio, among others. Distinguished Professor at the University of Utah, Rekdal is currently Utah Poet Laureate.

The Fisher Family Writer-in-Residence is sponsored by Steven Fisher, a 1970 English alumnus, and receives generous support from the Joseph L. Grucci Poetry Endowment, University Libraries, the English Department, and the College of Liberal Arts.

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Ledbury crime writer Sarah Hilary will be on a college scholarship https://fcacleveland.org/ledbury-crime-writer-sarah-hilary-will-be-on-a-college-scholarship/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 04:52:30 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/ledbury-crime-writer-sarah-hilary-will-be-on-a-college-scholarship/ An award-winning crime perpetrator will mentor students at the University of Worcester from September. Ledbury-based Sarah Hilary, who won Theakston’s Old Peculiar Crime Novel of the Year 2015 award for her debut novel Someone Else’s Skin, is on a scholarship at the university. A former bookseller, Sarah won the Fish Criminally Short Histories award in […]]]>

An award-winning crime perpetrator will mentor students at the University of Worcester from September.

Ledbury-based Sarah Hilary, who won Theakston’s Old Peculiar Crime Novel of the Year 2015 award for her debut novel Someone Else’s Skin, is on a scholarship at the university.

A former bookseller, Sarah won the Fish Criminally Short Histories award in 2008, the Cheshire Prize for Literature in 2012 and had Someone Else’s Skin shortlisted for the Richard & Judy Book Club in 2014.

His second book, No Other Darkness, was shortlisted for a Barry Award.

She will join the University of Worcester as part of the Royal Literary Fund Fellowship scheme, which aims to place professional writers at higher education institutions to provide writing support for all students.

“The role exists to support university students who may struggle with the demands of essay writing, analytical thinking, etc.,” Sarah said.

“It is a purely voluntary service with students referred by tutors or at their request. They come and spend time talking with one of the RLF Fellows, learning practical skills, building their confidence, and making progress toward their writing goals.

support system

Students are discouraged from asking fellows to edit or proofread work before it is submitted. Rather, the idea is to get feedback on a first draft or seek advice on particular aspects of style or technique.

“I wish there had been an RLF scholar at the college I graduated from many years ago now,” Sarah said. “University can be a daunting step at any age.

“Each university, such as Worcester, has a support system in place to help students cope with these new demands and challenges. RLF Fellows are part of this support system, providing fresh insight and understanding whenever needed.

“It’s my first scholarship and I’ve been told that Worcester is a wonderful university to work with. I’m happy to start.

Sarah’s latest book, Fragile, is now available.

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Crime writer Sarah Hilary to become a college scholarship holder https://fcacleveland.org/crime-writer-sarah-hilary-to-become-a-college-scholarship-holder/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/crime-writer-sarah-hilary-to-become-a-college-scholarship-holder/ An award-winning crime perpetrator will mentor students at the University of Worcester from September. Sarah Hilary, who won Theakston’s Old Peculiar Crime Novel of the Year 2015 award for her debut novel Someone Else’s Skin, has a scholarship position at the university. A former bookseller, Sarah won the Fish Criminally Short Histories award in 2008, […]]]>

An award-winning crime perpetrator will mentor students at the University of Worcester from September.

Sarah Hilary, who won Theakston’s Old Peculiar Crime Novel of the Year 2015 award for her debut novel Someone Else’s Skin, has a scholarship position at the university.

A former bookseller, Sarah won the Fish Criminally Short Histories award in 2008, the Cheshire Prize for Literature in 2012 and had Someone Else’s Skin shortlisted for the Richard & Judy Book Club in 2014.

His second book, No Other Darkness, was shortlisted for a Barry Award.

She will join the University of Worcester as part of the Royal Literary Fund Fellowship scheme, which aims to place professional writers in higher education institutions to provide writing support for all students.

“The role exists to support university students who may struggle with the demands of essay writing, analytical thinking, etc.,” Sarah said.

“It is a purely voluntary service with students referred by tutors or at their request. They come and spend time talking with one of the RLF Fellows, learning practical skills, building their confidence, and making progress toward their writing goals.

support system

Students are discouraged from asking fellows to edit or proofread work before it is submitted. Rather, the idea is to get feedback on a first draft or seek advice on particular aspects of style or technique.

“I wish there had been an RLF scholar at the college I graduated from many years ago now,” Sarah said. “University can be a daunting step at any age.

“Each university, such as Worcester, has a support system in place to help students cope with these new demands and challenges. RLF Fellows are part of this support system, providing fresh insight and understanding whenever needed.

“It’s my first scholarship and I’ve been told that Worcester is a wonderful university to work with. I’m happy to start.

Sarah’s latest book, Fragile, is now available.

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The successful author arrives at the Cd’A https://fcacleveland.org/the-successful-author-arrives-at-the-cda/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 09:08:57 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/the-successful-author-arrives-at-the-cda/ A New York Times bestselling author will speak at Coeur d’Alene as part of the Humanities Council of Idaho’s annual event. David Grann, also an award-winning editor of The New Yorker magazine, will give the 17th Annual Northern Idaho Distinguished Humanities Lecture on May 6 at 7 p.m. at the Coeur d’Alene Resort. “This is […]]]>

A New York Times bestselling author will speak at Coeur d’Alene as part of the Humanities Council of Idaho’s annual event.

David Grann, also an award-winning editor of The New Yorker magazine, will give the 17th Annual Northern Idaho Distinguished Humanities Lecture on May 6 at 7 p.m. at the Coeur d’Alene Resort.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for us to come together again,” said David Pettyjohn, executive director of the Humanities Council of Idaho. “Not only is this a great opportunity to hear from Mr. Grann, but also to ask questions and strike up a conversation with your dining companions.”

Grann will talk about his latest book, “The White Darkness”, a story of adventure and obsession in Antarctica.

“(The board) all believed this would be of great benefit to northern Idaho and its audience,” Pettyjohn said. “Stories of strength and courage definitely resonate with everyone.”

Grann was originally scheduled to speak in fall 2020, but the event was postponed due to COVID. He’ll also discuss his best-selling book, “Killers of the Flower Moon,” which is slated for a movie release in November.

“It’s just a wonderful, lovely event to reconnect with everyone, learn about a fascinating part of our history, and engage in some really important discussions,” Pettyjohn said.

The event is sponsored in part by CDA Press, Idaho Forest Group, Lewis-Clark State College, University of Idaho, North Idaho College and Idaho Public Television.

Grann’s lecture is part of the Democracy and the Informed Citizen initiative, supported in part by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

General tickets are $65 and include dinner and conference seating. Doors open at 6 p.m. and dinner is served at 7 p.m.

Benefactor tickets are $130 and include admission to a private reception with Grann at a separate location from 5-6:15 p.m. before the event. Tickets include close seating for dinner and the 7 p.m. talk

A general table with seating for eight is $520 and a benefactor table with eight seats is $1,000.

It is also possible to make an additional donation to enable local students to attend.

“I love visiting Coeur d’Alene,” said Pettyjohn. “I’m just thrilled to have the opportunity to engage and converse and be a part of this wonderful event.”

Tickets: idahohumanities.org/events

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Mystery and thriller author will visit Worthington Library to talk about writing – The Globe https://fcacleveland.org/mystery-and-thriller-author-will-visit-worthington-library-to-talk-about-writing-the-globe/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/mystery-and-thriller-author-will-visit-worthington-library-to-talk-about-writing-the-globe/ WORTHINGTON — Award-winning mystery thriller author Allen Eskens will visit the Worthington branch of the Nobles County Library Thursday at 6:30 p.m. to talk about storytelling, the craft of writing and the publishing process. When he started writing, Eskens never expected to become a full-time novelist. “I really thought I was going to do this […]]]>

WORTHINGTON — Award-winning mystery thriller author Allen Eskens will visit the Worthington branch of the Nobles County Library Thursday at 6:30 p.m. to talk about storytelling, the craft of writing and the publishing process.

When he started writing, Eskens never expected to become a full-time novelist.

“I really thought I was going to do this for my own enjoyment, and when I decided to get published it was ‘let’s see’, ‘what if’, ‘let’s see if this could happen,'” Eskens said. . “And now I’m a full-time writer. My passion has become my vocation.

Eskens already has seven books to his credit since his first, ‘The Life We Bury’ was published in 2014. It was followed by ‘The Guise of Another’, ‘The Heavens May Fall’, ‘The Deep Dark Descending “, “The Shadows We Hide”, “Nothing More Dangerous” and “The Stolen Hours”. His eighth book will be released in September.

Many of Eskens’ books are set in Minnesota, with locations in Cottonwood County, Austin, and the Twin Cities, and that’s because he follows the age-old advice to write what he knows.

Eskens grew up in Missouri, but earned a journalism degree from the University of Minnesota, followed by a law degree from Hamline University. He practiced criminal law for 25 years, but also studied creative writing at Minnesota State University – Mankato, the Loft Literary Center, and the Iowa Summer Writer’s Festival.

When he finished law school, he began studying writing for his own enjoyment, intending to write stories for fun – but he wanted to write them better.

“I had a passion for writing, but I didn’t want to be known as another lawyer turned writer. My original plan was that I wanted to be a literary novelist, because I didn’t want to be that cliché,” Eskens said.

And then he kept reading books by famous and beloved authors who kept getting the legal elements of their writing wrong, and it kept bothering him. When he saw Clint Eastwood’s 2003 film Mystic River, Eskens realized that a mystery or crime drama could still be a real character story, and decided that was what he wanted. make.

“Allen Eskens is a pretty popular author in our system,” said Daniel Mick, adult duty librarian at the Nobles County Library, comparing his work to David Baldacci and James Patterson, who also write thrillers and novels. legal thrillers. “We’re really thrilled to have him here.”

In her talk on Thursday, which is free and open to the public, Eskens will talk about her writing techniques and process.

“When I write a scene, as a writer, what you normally do, you imagine what the scene is like,” Eskens said. “And I have a very vivid imagination, but when I go to a stage and walk around, I understand it better. I use more senses than my visual sense when I was dreaming.

He advised every author to learn the craft and develop the tools and techniques needed to write a better novel.

“Even a bad plot can be made interesting if you know the craft, and a great plot can be destroyed if you don’t know the craft,” Eskens said.

Funding for the author’s visit comes from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund (a branch of the Clean Waters Act), and the money is designated by Minnesota voters who fund libraries for arts and cultural heritage programming .

For more information about Eskens, visit alleneskens.com.

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Bethesda and Chevy Chase Writers Honored in Local Writers Showcase https://fcacleveland.org/bethesda-and-chevy-chase-writers-honored-in-local-writers-showcase/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 15:54:12 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/bethesda-and-chevy-chase-writers-honored-in-local-writers-showcase/ BETHESDA, MD — Residents of Bethesda are among more than 30 writers honored for their work in Bethesda’s Local Writer’s Showcase, a competition created by the Bethesda Urban Partnership. “The showcase consists of two awards ceremonies and readings, honoring the winners of the annual Bethesda Essay and Short Story Competition and the Bethesda Poetry Competition,” […]]]>

BETHESDA, MD — Residents of Bethesda are among more than 30 writers honored for their work in Bethesda’s Local Writer’s Showcase, a competition created by the Bethesda Urban Partnership.

“The showcase consists of two awards ceremonies and readings, honoring the winners of the annual Bethesda Essay and Short Story Competition and the Bethesda Poetry Competition,” the Bethesda Urban Partnership said in a press release.

Dian Seidel of Chevy Chase won first place in the essay category, Ellie Tinsky of Walt Whitman High School won second place in the high school essay contest, Allison Xu of Walter Johnson High School won third place in the contest high school essay writer, Phoebe Lewis of Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School won honorable mention in high school essay contest, Elliot Wilner of Bethesda won first place in short story contest, Jaime Banks of Bethesda won first place in in the poetry category, Raquel Vazquez of Bethesda won third place in the poetry category, Akbota Saudabayeva of Bethesda received honorable mention in the poetry category, and Sophia Hall of Bethesda Holton Arms won the poetry category.

Find out what’s going on in Bethesda – Chevy Chase with free real-time Patch updates.

The ceremonies will take place on March 10 and 11 and will be free and open to the public. The writers’ work was judged by award-winning poet Dora Malec, writer Christine Koubek, director of creative writing at George Washington University, and Lisa Page, and author, writing professor GG Renee Hill, and writers Myna Chang, Carrie Callaghan, Ofelia Montelongo, Will Pittman, Adam Schwartz and Alice Stephens, the Bethesda Urban Partnership said in a press release.

More than 450 pieces were submitted to the competition. A total of $4,500 in prizes will be distributed to the winners and all essay and short story winners will be published on the Bethesda Magazine website and the Bethesda Urban Partnership website.

Find out what’s going on in Bethesda – Chevy Chase with free real-time Patch updates.

Bethesda Magazine and The Writer‘s Center are sponsors of the showcase.

Here is the full list of winners:

Trial winners

Dian Seidel, Chevy Chase, MD, 1st place

Marla Hirsch, Potomac, MD, 2nd place

Louis Siegel, Rockville, MD, 3rd place

Jennifer Blanck, Arlington, Virginia, honorable mention

Thu Nguyen, Gaithersburg, MD, honorable mention

Emmy Song, Rockville, MD, honorable mention

High School Essay Winners

Ada Fiala, Richard Montgomery High School, 1st place

Ellie Tinsky, Walt Whitman High School, 2nd place

Allison Xu, Walter Johnson High School, 3rd place

Phoebe Lewis, Bethesda Chevy Chase High School, Honorable Mention

Short story winners

Elliot Wilner, Bethesda, MD, 1st place

Sharon Nissim, Silver Spring, MD, 2nd place

Jackie Jacobson, Rockville, MD, 3rd place

Eva Cantler, Washington, DC, Honorable Mention

Kristina Saccone, Silver Spring, MD, honorable mention

High School Short Story Winners

Cathryn Russ, Wootton High School, 1st place

Angelica Frude, Richard Montgomery High School, 2nd place

Jonah Witte, Montgomery Blair High School, 3rd place

Mikayla Bellman, Paint Branch High School, Honorable Mention

Camryn Crump, Damascus High School, honorable mention

Omotola Fadeyi, Paint Branch High School, Honorable Mention

Poetry Winners

Jaime Banks, Bethesda MD, 1st place

Frederick Zirm, Rockville, MD, 2nd place

Raquel Vazquez, Bethesda, MD, 3rd place

Akbota Saudabayeva, Bethesda, MD, honorable mention

Doug Wilkinson, Takoma Park, MD, honorable mention

Jenn Koiter, Washington, DC, Honorable Mention

High School Poetry Winners

Sophia Room, Holton Arms

Sam Melton, Rockville High School

Sophia Flyer, Georgetown Day School

Zara Okudo, Wootton High School

Joshua Phillips, Phillips Academy

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Chilling Leith tram digs inspire best-selling author James Oswald’s latest supernatural Edinburgh crime novel https://fcacleveland.org/chilling-leith-tram-digs-inspire-best-selling-author-james-oswalds-latest-supernatural-edinburgh-crime-novel/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 14:20:27 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/chilling-leith-tram-digs-inspire-best-selling-author-james-oswalds-latest-supernatural-edinburgh-crime-novel/ Excavation of the medieval cemetery at South Leith Parish Church as part of the Trams to Newhaven project inspired James Oswald’s latest novel, All That Lives Let us know what you think and join the conversation at the bottom of this article The twelfth book in his award-winning Edinburgh detective series Inspector McLean finds Oswald’s […]]]>
Excavation of the medieval cemetery at South Leith Parish Church as part of the Trams to Newhaven project inspired James Oswald’s latest novel, All That Lives

Let us know what you think and join the conversation at the bottom of this article

The twelfth book in his award-winning Edinburgh detective series Inspector McLean finds Oswald’s best-selling copper investigating the discovery of human remains in the historic graveyard, unearthed during the Trams to Newhaven excavation. A case of art imitating life?

“I read the report online but I didn’t really want to know who the body was, it wasn’t really important, but finding it was the spark of an idea,” he explains, adding after a moment of thought, “That and the fact that it was found in Leith, where Madame Rose lives. Could they be connected? I wondered.”

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Author James Oswald has created a parallel Edinburgh where crime and the supernatural collide

In the latest in the ongoing series, two victims with nothing to connect them other than someone buried them in the exact same way catch Tony McLean’s eye. There’s a twist though, the bodies were buried seven centuries apart.

The mystery begins when the construction of a tramline at South Leith Cemetery unearths a hoax body – some suspect it is a gruesome sacrifice, placed for a purpose.

When a second body, that of a woman who disappeared 30 years ago, is unearthed, the similarities between her death and that of the former woman suggest something even more disturbing.

Drawn into the investigation, McLean finds himself torn between a disturbing trend of drug-related deaths in and around the capital and uncovering what really connects the bodies. When a third body is discovered, however, he begins to suspect some dark purpose at play and that whoever put them there is far from done.

everything that lives

All That Lives finds ​Oswald​, who also writes the popular DC series Constance​ ​Fairchild, once again breathing life into its present-day parallel Edinburgh, a place where crime and the supernatural not only coexist but frequently intertwine.

It is in this world, over the past decade, that regular characters like retired desk sergeant Grumpy Bob, the aforementioned mystic Madame Rose, DS Janie Harrison and her nemesis, the evil Mrs. Saifre have become de increasingly familiar to readers, often appearing at the most unexpected times to keep the action going and the pages turning.

“Characters are the most important thing and fuel serial fiction well because you have the time and space to give each one their own life,” says the writer when asked about the popularity of his creations which appear book after book, evolving and aging. as they do.

Oswald continues, “That’s what readers really like, that’s why soap operas are so popular, people like to live someone else’s life for a little while, so if you get your characters nailed, the story comes naturally from that.”

On the farm with James Oswald

Everything that lives is born from this approach. With his cast in place, all he had to do was decide what he wanted from the plot.

He recalls: “It all came out of the discovery of the body in the South Leith Kirk pit during the excavations for the tram works. It was a brilliant idea for a story. I had all my characters, developed over 11 books previous ones, just throw at them and ask them, ‘What could that mean?'”

Published Thursday, February 17, All That Lives revisits historic Leith Cemetery throughout the book, which was conceived, developed, written and will be published long before the work on the tram that inspired it was completed.

“In their defence, I write very quickly…”, laughs the author who, by day, raises Highland cows and Romney sheep on his farm near Newburgh.

Read more

Read more

Meet James Oswald, the supernatural crime writer hailed as ‘the new Ian Rankin’

Readers were first introduced to McLean’s Edinburgh and its cast of good, bad, and quirky characters in the 2012 novel Natural Causes, which was shortlisted for the prestigious CWA Debut Dagger Award, as was the second from the series, The Book of Souls.

Over 12 books, his designs have policed ​​an Edinburgh that is instantly recognizable and yet slightly out of step with the one we know.

Looking back, Oswald reflects, “I never had a big story arc in mind for the books, I don’t know what’s going to happen in Inspector McLean Volume 16, but I like to let the open things up and have possibilities that I can then pick up in a later book to run with. It’s a series, so I always think something has to happen next.

He continues, “In an individual book, I’ll remember things from previous books, usually because someone asked me a question on Twitter and I was like, ‘Oh, I remember now. That kind of sparks an idea, which is totally how I write. I’m not planning much although I like a nice fixed opening scene. I write better when I have this sorted.

That said, and without giving away any spoilers, McLean admits that All That Lives’ bluff ending left him with one worry, one he wants to rest from the get-go.

“I may have made my life a bit difficult there, it’s not Tony McLean’s last book but a lot of people are going to ask me, ‘Is this the last?’ However, this is the last book of my current contract with Wildfire.

He reassures his readers: “There will be a volume 13 and there will be a volume 14 too, because it would be bad luck to leave it on volume 13.”

That’s not to say the prolific Oswald doesn’t have other new projects in the works as well. He is considering a possible spin-off novel starring DS Janie Harrison, but he fears readers will see it as an Inspector McLean novel without McLean. He also “drafted” ideas for another Scottish crime series with all new characters.

“It would make sense in a kind of Lewis after Morse to give Janie Harrison her own book. So I could try to do that next,” he mused.

All That Lives by James Oswald​ is out​ Thursday, February 17​,​ in Hardback by Wildfire​, priced at £16.99

Meet the Author: An Evening with James Oswald, Waterstone’s West End, Princes Street, Tuesday 8 March, 6pm, tickets here

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Award-winning children’s book author Nancy Churnin named winner of the 2021 National Jewish Book Award https://fcacleveland.org/award-winning-childrens-book-author-nancy-churnin-named-winner-of-the-2021-national-jewish-book-award/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 06:05:04 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/award-winning-childrens-book-author-nancy-churnin-named-winner-of-the-2021-national-jewish-book-award/ Today the Jewish Book Council is pleased to announce that Nancy Churnin, former theater critic for the Dallas Morning News and award-winning author of children’s books, has been named the winner of the 2021 National Jewish Book Award in the Children’s category. Picture Book for “Dear Mr. Dickens” illustrated by Bethany Stancliffe (Albert Whitman & […]]]>

Today the Jewish Book Council is pleased to announce that Nancy Churnin, former theater critic for the Dallas Morning News and award-winning author of children’s books, has been named the winner of the 2021 National Jewish Book Award in the Children’s category. Picture Book for “Dear Mr. Dickens” illustrated by Bethany Stancliffe (Albert Whitman & Co).

DALLAS, January 21, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Today the Jewish Book Council is pleased to announce Nancy Churninformer theater critic for the Dallas Morning News and award-winning author of children’s books has been named the winner of the 2021 National Jewish Book Award in the Children’s Picture Book category for Dear Mr. Dickens, illustrated by Bethany Stancliffe (Albert Whitman & Co).

Nancy is the author of numerous books written to teach and educate young readers about historical figures, including Martin & Anne: The Kindred Spirits of Dr. Martin Luther King jr. and Anne Frankbeautiful shades of Brown: The art of Laura WheelerThe William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game and IrvingBerlin: The immigrant boy who made America sing. Teaching guides and school projects are available for all of his books.

With Dear Mr. Dickens, Churnin teaches young readers about the prejudices that were common against Jews. She explains that in by Eliza Davis daytime, Charles Dickens was the most famous living writer of England. But some of his books reflected a prejudice that was all too prevalent at the time: prejudice against the Jewish people. Eliza was Jewish, and her heart ached to see a Jewish character in Oliver Twist portrayed as ugly and selfish. She wanted to say how unfair it was, even if it meant exposing the great man himself. So she wrote a letter to Charles Dickens. What happened next is history.

What people say….

STARRED REVIEW! “Not only is this historical account well-written, but Stancliffe’s illustrations powerfully take readers back to the times. An important addition to libraries that fills a gap on anti-Semitism and the fight against prejudice.” ― Featured journal of School Library Journal

“Churnin presents this well-researched and little-known episode to young readers in simple, straightforward language that conveys both Eliza’s pain and her determination to right a wrong and provides them with a thoughtful comparison to their own time. A compelling piece history and lots to think about.” ―Kirkus Reviews

“Stancliffe’s engaging illustrations with a lush palette are interspersed with black-and-white drawings that evoke the Dickens era. Churnin’s language also echoes the period and includes direct quotes from the pair’s seven letters.” ―The Horn Book, Book Bundles

Chicago Public Library Best Information Books for Young Readers 2021
The Best Jewish Children’s Books of 2021, Tablet Magazine

The books are available online and in bookstores.
To learn more about Nancy Churningo to: https://www.nancychurnin.com/

ON NANCY CHURNIN
Born in New York, Nancy is a graduate of Harvard Universityholder of a master’s degree Colombia University. She lives in dallas with her husband, a dog named Dog and two cantankerous cats.

Media Contact

Cindy BirneCindy Birne Public Relations, 214-405-8047, cindy.birne@cindybirnepr.com

Twitter

THE SOURCE Nancy Churnin

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Minnesota author Tessa Bridal on “Uruguay’s Missing Children” – Twin Cities https://fcacleveland.org/minnesota-author-tessa-bridal-on-uruguays-missing-children-twin-cities/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:12:25 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/minnesota-author-tessa-bridal-on-uruguays-missing-children-twin-cities/ TESSA BRIDE: An author from Minnesota, originally from Uruguay, presents “The Dark Side of Memory: Uruguay’s Missing Children and the Families Who Never Ceased to Search,” in a conversation with Ry Siggelkow. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 11, in-store, Magers & Quinn, 3038 Hennepin Ave. S., Mpls. DEEP MEDICINE: East Side Freedom Library welcomes Rupa Marya […]]]>


TESSA BRIDE: An author from Minnesota, originally from Uruguay, presents “The Dark Side of Memory: Uruguay’s Missing Children and the Families Who Never Ceased to Search,” in a conversation with Ry Siggelkow. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 11, in-store, Magers & Quinn, 3038 Hennepin Ave. S., Mpls.

DEEP MEDICINE: East Side Freedom Library welcomes Rupa Marya and Ray Patel discussing their book “Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice”, which takes readers on a medical examination through the human body and the hidden relationships between our biological systems and injustices of our politics and economic systems. Their solution: the deep medicine of decolonization. Patel is a renowned political economist and best-selling author of The Value of Nothing. Rupa Marya is a physician who works with patients in marginalized communities. Virtual event. 7:30 p.m., Tuesday January 11. To register, go to: Eastsidefreedomlibrary.org or watch live on the ESFL Facebook page.

ALLISON EPSTEIN: Presents his novel “A Tip for the Hangman”. 7 p.m. Thursday, January 13. Virtual event, presented by Magers & Quinn. Information on : magersandquinn.com/events.

LITERARY BRIDGES: The reading series which is the result of a merger between Literary Lights by Donna Isaac and the Bridges series by Stan Kusunoki welcomes David Mura, whose latest book is “A Stranger’s Journey: Race, Identity & Narrative Craft in Writing”; award-winning poets Michael Torres and Caitlin Bailey; Lillian Hewitt, second year student at Shakopee High School; and Ojibwa writer Morgan Kerber-Folstrom from Shakopee. At the store. 2:00 p.m. Sunday January 16, Next Chapter Booksellers, 38 S. Snelling Ave., St. Paul.

WHAT ELSE HAPPENS

RockPaperPoem, a new online poetry review founded by a group of Minnesota poets, published its first issue. In preparation for two years, this first issue brings together poets from New York to California whose words combine with art. There is no requirement for submissions, which are open to anyone. No fees to submit, and poets retain copyright in their work. Any poem written in English is welcome. The online newspaper reading period began on January 5 and continues until February 15. RockPaperPoem.com.

The Shelf Awareness website lists Top 10 Book Club titles for 2021. How many of these books has your club read? Do you agree with the choices? Did you like the books you read? The Top 10: “The Four Winds” by Kristin Hannah; “The Vanishing Half”, Brit Bennett; “Anxious People,” Frederik Backman; “American Dirt”, Jeannine Cummins; “The Guest List,” Lucy Foley; “The Midnight Library,” Matt Haig; “The last thing he said to me; Laura Dave; “The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue”, VE Schwab; “The Silent Patient”, Alex Michaelides and “The Star Giver”, Jojo Moyes.

If you’ve heard good things about by Tara Westover successful memory “Educated” and has never had a copy, his book will be released in paperback on February 8. The story of the author’s journey from his childhood in a family of survivors in the mountains of Idaho to Harvard and Cambridge spent 135 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. , including 14 weeks at number 1. It was named one of the best books of the year by over 20 publications, was named Book of the Year by the American Booksellers Association and won the Goodreads Choice Award for memoirs / autobiographies.


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