high school – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 14:40:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fcacleveland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png high school – FCA Cleveland http://fcacleveland.org/ 32 32 Manning becomes a self-published author and prepares to sign a book | News https://fcacleveland.org/manning-becomes-a-self-published-author-and-prepares-to-sign-a-book-news/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 14:40:00 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/manning-becomes-a-self-published-author-and-prepares-to-sign-a-book-news/ At just 15 years old, Manning resident Miles Houston managed to become a published author and cultivate millions of streams for his music. Dually enrolled through home schooling and the IKM-Manning School District, the high school student dedicates his time to creating art through his words. His book, “The Crow’s Flight,” was published last November. […]]]>

At just 15 years old, Manning resident Miles Houston managed to become a published author and cultivate millions of streams for his music.

Dually enrolled through home schooling and the IKM-Manning School District, the high school student dedicates his time to creating art through his words.

His book, “The Crow’s Flight,” was published last November. The story centers on two brothers named Amaro and Conrad Espero, both of whom came from humble beginnings and grew up to be kings. However, darkness begins to consume their kingdoms, leading to betrayal.

The Carroll Public Library will host a book signing featuring Houston on March 22 from 10 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Houston said he classifies the book as a “weak fantasy”, incorporating magic into the story but not delving into fictional creatures.






Flight of the Raven by Miles Houston.




Houston wanted to write the book as a “comfortable classic”, a book where a reader can walk by without it feeling like a huge undertaking. The book was originally 200 pages, but after Houston went through it and cut out the “fluff”, it ended up at 147 pages.

When creating the story, Houston said, it took about six months to write. During the process, Houston said, there were instances where he “wanted to throw the book away and never see it again.”

To overcome his writer‘s block, he referenced the book “Spilling Ink: A Young Writer’s Handbook”, by Anne Mazer and Ellen Potter, where he used the advice to sit down with his characters and have a conversation with them.

“I couldn’t leave these characters hanging,” Houston said. “It was almost like you were dropping a fictional person.”

Even though the book has darker tones, Houston said, he wanted the book to appeal to a wide range of ages, so he showed his younger brother a copy. In formatting her book, Houston also consulted with her mother and friends.

Although his friends provided direct comments, Houston said he appreciated hearing them.

“There were a few times they encouraged me to break the monotony, which was helpful,” Houston said.

Lately, Houston said, he’s been busy reading Western and detective literature, hoping to try and write a mystery book in the future. Currently, he is reading “True Grit” by Charles Portis.

Outside of writing, Houston has also produced three albums, titled “Frequencies from the fallout”, “Find me @ at the BOTTOM”, and “American Dreamer”.

In order to share her music worldwide, Houston used a service called RouteNote, which publishes her music on Spotify, Apple Music and Amazon Music.

His music has garnered 11 million streams worldwide, gaining listeners from South American and Asian countries.

“It’s weird because nothing has changed,” Houston said. “I still live in the same place and do the same things every day, but all these people listen to me.”

Later, Houston says, he hopes to one day go on tour for his work, whether it’s for a book or his music.

For any young author working on their book, Houston said, he advises not to take criticism from other readers too personally. While evaluating his work, Houston said he thought comments should be critical, but not harsh.

“It’s not comments about you, it’s comments about your project,” Houston said. “If you have a boring scene, it doesn’t mean you’re boring, it means that scene can be slow, and be patient. Don’t write something you think is mediocre and just leave it.

At his book signing, copies of “The Crow’s Flight” will be available for $7, with payments accepted in cash, check and PayPal. A Kindle version is also available on Amazon for $4.

“I’m really excited for this book signing, hope it goes well,” Houston said. “If even one person shows up and gets a book, I consider that a success.”

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Iraj Pezeshkzad, author of classic Iranian novel, dies at 94 https://fcacleveland.org/iraj-pezeshkzad-author-of-classic-iranian-novel-dies-at-94/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 09:28:01 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/iraj-pezeshkzad-author-of-classic-iranian-novel-dies-at-94/ But Professor Abbas Milani, a historian and director of Iranian studies at Stanford University, said the book eclipsed Mr Pezeshkzad’s more serious writings, including his scholarly research into literature by Persian poets Hafez and Saadi. Mr Pezeshkzad, he said, wanted his literary and non-fiction work to receive equal attention. This has never been the case. […]]]>

But Professor Abbas Milani, a historian and director of Iranian studies at Stanford University, said the book eclipsed Mr Pezeshkzad’s more serious writings, including his scholarly research into literature by Persian poets Hafez and Saadi. Mr Pezeshkzad, he said, wanted his literary and non-fiction work to receive equal attention. This has never been the case.

When Stanford presented Mr. Pezeshkzad with its Bita Award for Persian Arts in 2014, around 1,200 people attended the ceremony, the most for any Iran-related event at the school.

Iraj Pezeshkzad was born on January 29, 1927 in Tehran to Hassan Pezeshkzad, a doctor, and Gohar Fekri Ershad, an aristocrat of the Qajar dynasty.

He had a sister and three half-brothers, and from the age of 9 lived in a compound surrounded by a 30,000 square foot leafy garden. Some members of his extended family also lived at the compound.

As a child, he was a keen observer of his surroundings and those who inhabited it, and he later drew inspiration from them as a writer. In an essay about his childhood, for example, he recalled the delusional uncle who held court with children, asking them to pay homage to him by kissing his hands.

After graduating from high school in Iran, Mr. Pezeshkzad earned a law degree from the University of Dijon (now the University of Burgundy) in France. He soon began writing satirical short stories for Iranian publications and translating books by French writers like Voltaire and Molière into Persian. Back in Iran, he marries Mahin Chaybani. She died in 1979.

In Iran, he was a judge for five years, then worked for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as head of its cultural division until he was purged from his post after the revolution. Throughout, he wrote a popular satirical column for a literary magazine and produced plays, articles, research papers and books.

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Bethesda and Chevy Chase Writers Honored in Local Writers Showcase https://fcacleveland.org/bethesda-and-chevy-chase-writers-honored-in-local-writers-showcase/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 15:54:12 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/bethesda-and-chevy-chase-writers-honored-in-local-writers-showcase/ BETHESDA, MD — Residents of Bethesda are among more than 30 writers honored for their work in Bethesda’s Local Writer’s Showcase, a competition created by the Bethesda Urban Partnership. “The showcase consists of two awards ceremonies and readings, honoring the winners of the annual Bethesda Essay and Short Story Competition and the Bethesda Poetry Competition,” […]]]>

BETHESDA, MD — Residents of Bethesda are among more than 30 writers honored for their work in Bethesda’s Local Writer’s Showcase, a competition created by the Bethesda Urban Partnership.

“The showcase consists of two awards ceremonies and readings, honoring the winners of the annual Bethesda Essay and Short Story Competition and the Bethesda Poetry Competition,” the Bethesda Urban Partnership said in a press release.

Dian Seidel of Chevy Chase won first place in the essay category, Ellie Tinsky of Walt Whitman High School won second place in the high school essay contest, Allison Xu of Walter Johnson High School won third place in the contest high school essay writer, Phoebe Lewis of Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School won honorable mention in high school essay contest, Elliot Wilner of Bethesda won first place in short story contest, Jaime Banks of Bethesda won first place in in the poetry category, Raquel Vazquez of Bethesda won third place in the poetry category, Akbota Saudabayeva of Bethesda received honorable mention in the poetry category, and Sophia Hall of Bethesda Holton Arms won the poetry category.

Find out what’s going on in Bethesda – Chevy Chase with free real-time Patch updates.

The ceremonies will take place on March 10 and 11 and will be free and open to the public. The writers’ work was judged by award-winning poet Dora Malec, writer Christine Koubek, director of creative writing at George Washington University, and Lisa Page, and author, writing professor GG Renee Hill, and writers Myna Chang, Carrie Callaghan, Ofelia Montelongo, Will Pittman, Adam Schwartz and Alice Stephens, the Bethesda Urban Partnership said in a press release.

More than 450 pieces were submitted to the competition. A total of $4,500 in prizes will be distributed to the winners and all essay and short story winners will be published on the Bethesda Magazine website and the Bethesda Urban Partnership website.

Find out what’s going on in Bethesda – Chevy Chase with free real-time Patch updates.

Bethesda Magazine and The Writer‘s Center are sponsors of the showcase.

Here is the full list of winners:

Trial winners

Dian Seidel, Chevy Chase, MD, 1st place

Marla Hirsch, Potomac, MD, 2nd place

Louis Siegel, Rockville, MD, 3rd place

Jennifer Blanck, Arlington, Virginia, honorable mention

Thu Nguyen, Gaithersburg, MD, honorable mention

Emmy Song, Rockville, MD, honorable mention

High School Essay Winners

Ada Fiala, Richard Montgomery High School, 1st place

Ellie Tinsky, Walt Whitman High School, 2nd place

Allison Xu, Walter Johnson High School, 3rd place

Phoebe Lewis, Bethesda Chevy Chase High School, Honorable Mention

Short story winners

Elliot Wilner, Bethesda, MD, 1st place

Sharon Nissim, Silver Spring, MD, 2nd place

Jackie Jacobson, Rockville, MD, 3rd place

Eva Cantler, Washington, DC, Honorable Mention

Kristina Saccone, Silver Spring, MD, honorable mention

High School Short Story Winners

Cathryn Russ, Wootton High School, 1st place

Angelica Frude, Richard Montgomery High School, 2nd place

Jonah Witte, Montgomery Blair High School, 3rd place

Mikayla Bellman, Paint Branch High School, Honorable Mention

Camryn Crump, Damascus High School, honorable mention

Omotola Fadeyi, Paint Branch High School, Honorable Mention

Poetry Winners

Jaime Banks, Bethesda MD, 1st place

Frederick Zirm, Rockville, MD, 2nd place

Raquel Vazquez, Bethesda, MD, 3rd place

Akbota Saudabayeva, Bethesda, MD, honorable mention

Doug Wilkinson, Takoma Park, MD, honorable mention

Jenn Koiter, Washington, DC, Honorable Mention

High School Poetry Winners

Sophia Room, Holton Arms

Sam Melton, Rockville High School

Sophia Flyer, Georgetown Day School

Zara Okudo, Wootton High School

Joshua Phillips, Phillips Academy

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What do angels look like? A new article by best-selling author Jody Sharpe offers multiple perspectives on how angels look https://fcacleveland.org/what-do-angels-look-like-a-new-article-by-best-selling-author-jody-sharpe-offers-multiple-perspectives-on-how-angels-look/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 08:09:14 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/what-do-angels-look-like-a-new-article-by-best-selling-author-jody-sharpe-offers-multiple-perspectives-on-how-angels-look/ WILMINGTON, NC, Feb. 24, 2022 /24-7PressRelease/ — There’s no doubt that angels exist. However, the characteristics of angels are as varied as those who have encountered them in this world. Sharpe not only writes books about angels, she also collects stories about angels for the “Tuesdays with Angels” section of her website. She recently published […]]]>

WILMINGTON, NC, Feb. 24, 2022 /24-7PressRelease/ — There’s no doubt that angels exist. However, the characteristics of angels are as varied as those who have encountered them in this world. Sharpe not only writes books about angels, she also collects stories about angels for the “Tuesdays with Angels” section of her website. She recently published an article with a number of descriptions of angels and encounters with angels:

“To me, angels are as different as falling snowflakes,” Sharpe wrote. “They come in human form and in angel form, like we do, in different colors and shapes and sizes. I have never seen an angel with wings, but others I know have seen angels themselves. Some look like humans, some look like angels, and some are invisible.

“I’m also sure there is heaven above, I met an angel once over 25 years ago. He came in the form of a human, an older gentleman. Months after my daughter Kate, passed away suddenly. My dear friend, Nancy, invited me on a girls trip to Houston. On the first day of our trip to Houston, we went shopping at an upscale mall. There we met a man in a big store and just gave him a friendly hello to the men’s department, however the next day the man approached for us in a small store in a town an hour’s drive away. from Houston where neither of us had ever been. The tall man walked up to us and surprised us by saying “hello girls”. We chatted for a few minutes and he said, we jokingly thought, “See you at the airport.” Nancy and I laughed and turned to look at some presents. ts later, when Nancy and I turned back to him, the man was gone. Later we realized he must be an angel because it seemed like an amazing encounter. My fear of flying intensified after my daughter passed away. As we were looking down the street that day long ago, the gentleman was nowhere? We sat at a small table outside the store and thought, “Could this man be an angel sent to comfort me? My fear of flying has lessened over the years now and I have looked for him in airports but haven’t seen him, yet I know he is there. He never told us his name and we never told him ours, but to this day I call him, the man I call Angel.

“As I’ve been writing my Mystic Bay series over the past ten years, my novels have centered around angels living as humans. I’ve certainly asked a lot of people if they’ve seen angels. And to to my surprise, so many friends and strangers have had experiences. They are all first-hand from people I call friends or meet at literary events. Every encounter is comforting to me and extraordinary. A meeting is from a friend. Her husband had passed away. An angel appeared to her and identified herself as her guardian angel. She could not see his face clearly, but his wings were a beautiful gray blue color, folded at her side. She said he said comforting words to her when she felt bad that day. She said he was about 12 feet tall. She never forgot how her angel helped her with words of love and his presence that day.

The full text of the article is available on Sharpe’s website at https://jodysharpe.com.

Jody Sharpe also recently announced that two new screen treatments of her books are now available: “The Angel’s Daughter” and “Town Of Angels Christmas.” The angelic presence on earth is the central theme of all the books in his Mystic Bay series. The series is made up of four books, the first of which, “The Angel’s Daughter”, is now available on Kindle Unlimited.

Sharpe’s latest book “Town Of Angels Christmas, A Tale Of Love And Animal Rescue” was a bestseller in the Holiday Fiction category, “Town of Angels Christmas” features the same town and many characters from “Town of Angels” . In this new novel, Sharpe tackles a number of new issues his characters have to deal with, including animal rescue.

In ‘Town Of Angels Christmas’, a secret lurks in Mystic Bay, California. The angels live there like humans. Store owner Angel Ken fears the secret will be exposed when veterinarian Jordana Hart, a woman with special healing abilities, moves to town. Years before Angel Ken materializes as an old man, changing the course of his life.

Will Jordana recognize Angel Ken as the man from her past as they work together on a rescue mission to bring twenty-two horses to Mystic Bay before Christmas? Will they see what awaits them, a Christmas story that only angels could write?

Other books by Jody Sharpe include:

City of Angels – It’s angel versus bully in the town of Mystic Bay, California, where a well-kept secret lies. The angels live there like humans. After the angels appeared to three children, everything was happy in the town full of psychics and ordinary people. But as a bully, Klaus Waxman, comes to town, shop owner Angel Ken Leighton must carefully guide his herd of humans not to give in to the bully’s efforts. As Klaus opens a store mocking the sightings of resident angels, Angel Ken guides clairvoyant Justine Greer and her family to thwart her efforts. And with the help of the town’s oldest indomitable seer, Madame Norma, the bully meets his match with soft voices and intuitive wits…

The Midwest Review of “Town of Angels” said, “Those who welcome the thought, appearance, and approaches of angels into everyday life will appreciate the uplifting notes, mystery, and problem-solving attitudes of angels and humans alike. in this sweet story of kindness, hope, belief and the resolution of differences.

To Catch An Angel – Jody is also the author of ‘To Catch An Angel’, written in memory of her late husband Steve. In “To Catch An Angel”, miracles happen in Mystic Bay, California, the town with a psychic and angelic vibe. The angels are calling. Psychic Maggie Malone returns home to find she’s been swept away by the miracle of it all. She can’t imagine why her mother left or who her father might be. But these questions pale in comparison to the wonder of the angels. Maggie meets writer Noah Greenstreet. They realize they have met before, but where? Maggie and Noah embark on a journey to discover that our world is flooded with angels.

The Angel’s Daughter – A Secret resides in Mystic Bay, California, and only two people know about it. First there is Hannah, a tender half-angel with curly hair. Then there’s his dad, Gabe, an effervescent teddy bear of a pureblood angel. And it’s up to Hannah to keep the secret safe, but she made a colossal mistake telling her ex-boyfriend and writing teacher, Sam Blakely. Now he has written a book exposing the secret to the world.

Readers of the Mystic Bay series who want to get started with the first book in the series can now access “The Angel’s Daughter” on Kindle Unlimited. The book is a great introduction to Jody’s concept of angels on earth.

“Children with Special Needs, Angels on My Shoulder” is a memoir based on his twenty-five years of teaching children with special needs. The book placed second in the National Federation of Women’s Press At-Large Communications Contest. The book is both entertaining and enlightening. It’s a love story about special students and others who over the years have graced his life with that, their grace.

With hearts of angels and challenges ahead, the children took Sharpe on their journeys and inspired her own life’s journey of self-discovery. When heartbreak came, their kindness got her through. The synchronicity of events from high school to retirement changed her life for the better, turning her face to the sky.

Midwest Book Review said, “Sharpe’s ability to see the good in circumstances and people identifies the ‘special’ in ‘special needs’ as she describes her journey through the educational system and these teaching encounters and social events that changed his perspective and his life.

“Teachers (especially those who work with children with special needs) will find this spiritual and social reflection easily accessible. It’s presented in vignettes that offer small, digestible bites of a glimpse into a world where angels and kindness are present in more than one form.

“Children with Special Needs” followed his recently published children’s book about angels, “When the Angel Sent Butterflies.” The new book helps children understand that the love of their parents and others surrounds them. Love conquers fear and believing that angels are near can help wash away any childhood fears. This concept is featured in the book when Angel Ken sends butterflies to Jones and Kate. The book, suitable for ages 2 to 7, is available now on Amazon and Ingram.

Additionally, in the “Tuesdays with the Angels” section of his site, Sharpe features stories of actual encounters with angels. The stories are available on Sharpe’s website at http://www.jodysharpe.com.

Sharpe hopes to create a collection of angel stories that involve sightings of angels, interactions with angels, miraculous encounters with angels, and other types of narratives or stories. Everyone is invited to submit angel stories. All submissions will be considered, but inclusion is not guaranteed. Stories can be submitted at http://bit.ly/2FV8amd.

Sharpe’s YouTube channel brings it all together, offering segments on all of these topics. Bullying is a topic of particular concern, particularly as it relates to children with special needs.

In addition to the National Federation of Women in the Press award, Jody was chosen as the winner of the annual “50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading” book awards. She was chosen from hundreds of authors through a public voting process.

Jody Sharpe is available for media interviews and can be reached using the information below, or by email at [email protected]. Angel stories can be submitted at http://bit.ly/2FV8amd. All of his books are available from online booksellers. New quotes will be added every Tuesday to the “Tuesdays with the Angels” section of her blog, which can be found on her website at http://www.JodySharpe.com.

Profile:

Jody Sharpe has had a rewarding career as a special education teacher. Writing about angels became healing after losing her daughter and then her husband. The valuable lessons she learned about moving forward and loving life in the present gave her a mission to tell the stories with love, humor and spiritual awakening. The fictional town of Mystic Bay gave him an avenue to piece together characters and themes, hopefully illuminating the reader towards contemplation of life and the precious memories given to us.


Press release service and press release distribution provided by http://www.24-7pressrelease.com

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After a suicide attempt, a stack of medical bills. Illinois Writer Takes on Healthcare Industry in ‘Cost of Living’ | app https://fcacleveland.org/after-a-suicide-attempt-a-stack-of-medical-bills-illinois-writer-takes-on-healthcare-industry-in-cost-of-living-app/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 10:41:33 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/after-a-suicide-attempt-a-stack-of-medical-bills-illinois-writer-takes-on-healthcare-industry-in-cost-of-living-app/ EVANSTON, Ill. — Months after Emily Maloney attempted suicide, she finally opened her mail. She was 19, lived in Iowa City, an undergrad at the University of Iowa. She felt she never really knew how to be a person in the world. In high school, back in Lake Forest, Illinois, she wore wedding dresses and […]]]>

EVANSTON, Ill. — Months after Emily Maloney attempted suicide, she finally opened her mail. She was 19, lived in Iowa City, an undergrad at the University of Iowa. She felt she never really knew how to be a person in the world. In high school, back in Lake Forest, Illinois, she wore wedding dresses and combat boots to class, she wore bowler hats and tuxedos. She said she never fitted in alongside the young descendants of Chicago’s business barons. She graduated early, and now, alone in Iowa City, she was depressed. She was recovering.

The mail has piled up.

We met the other day at a cafe in Evanston, down the street from her house. She’s 36 now, with big dark eyes and a pleasant, easygoing disposition. This suicide attempt – it was her first and only attempt, she explained, but she had already been hospitalized for fear of taking her own life. She spoke informally, then with the precision of the healthcare industry, which she now knows a little too intimately.

“I have been hospitalized several times for being actively planning potentially but not yet executing an attempt. I would go to my therapist and say everything is fine. I always wanted to be a good patient so I took whatever they prescribed, whether it was good or bad for me. I would tell them it was okay, but those are my feelings and then they would be like, ‘Whoa, no, something is seriously wrong with you.’

“In the end, there was the attempt.”

After months passed, she grabbed a mail, opened it and found a notice from a collection agency. It was a big five-figure medical bill. She remembers thinking:

“Suicide should be cheaper.”

She writes this early in “Cost of Living,” her first book, a fascinating new collection of essays about her history with therapists, the drugs they prescribed, her chaotic upbringing in Illinois, and the inevitable cost of health care. It’s a clever title. Her medical debt, she writes, “was the cost of living, and I accrued it in the telemetry unit, on the fifth floor, at a community hospital in Iowa City, hundreds of miles from my home. “. She figured she owed, “Twenty-five dollars a month multiplied by the number of years that’s a bed on a custodial floor.”

If the suicide attempt is the dramatic heart of the book, its bill becomes a seething antagonist, a catalyst for depicting how Maloney paid off a debt, month after month, for a decade. Ironically, here’s how: She worked for Chicago-area hospitals and drug companies.

Shortly after starting to work in an emergency room, she felt she had finally found her people. She felt comfortable. She tied herself to work. She just wasn’t very good at it, she laughed.

She told me that she had always had a lot of jobs but had “never been a great employee. Because I work hard and burn out quickly. There are other ways, but I don’t know them.

In the author‘s biography of her book, it is noted that she worked as a pastry chef, dog groomer, general contractor, tile setter and catalog model and sold ceramics at art fairs; if there was more room, it might have added that she also trains horses and, more relevantly, has worked as a medical publications manager for healthcare agencies, including the Danish drugmaker’s Deerfield divisions Lundbeck and Takeda Pharmaceuticals.

The juiciest material comes from her six months in what she identifies as “a Level II trauma center just outside of Chicago.” In the book, she never mentions a hospital by name or identifies where she worked; she changed the names of the colleagues. She wants the book to be read as personal experiences that could have been had in any hospital in the country. In conversation, however, she notes that among the places she worked was the emergency room of what used to be Rush North Shore Medical Center (after a change in ownership, it is now Skokie Hospital ). Her duties included administering CPR and managing the EKG. Among his secondary tasks: studying patient records and giving an estimate of care – information then translated into an invoice.

I asked her if she was good at it.

No, she wasn’t particularly good at it.

But she was observant.

There’s nothing particularly shocking or damning about the “cost of living,” but rather, it often reads like a sort of prolonged, resigned sigh at the way health care works, at professionals doing often doing their best with limited resources, to long hours that lead to glassy expressions staring daily, hourly, at concerns. A child needs staples in his head. (“How much should it cost to put staples in a child’s head?”) There’s the doctor who, Maloney describes, “orders too many tests and blood cultures for anyone who might have an infection, that is, almost everyone who comes to the hospital.” There’s the medical equipment sales rep offering a $50 gift card to any nurse who can save a patient by using a new chest compression device Everything costs something, and “suicide attempts,” she writes, “were particularly dependent on resources”.

There is a physical cost, a psychiatric cost, additional medical costs, dressings…

Although Maloney loved medical environments, she decided while at Skokie that she should become a writer. She entered the MFA program at the University of Pittsburgh, where “Cost of Living” chapters (including the title essay) were developed. She hadn’t expected to be there or to write books. She never made a career plan.

Before becoming a condo, she grew up in Lake Point Tower, overlooking Navy Pier; later lived in River Forest; then eventually, moved to Lake Forest. She describes in the book her family’s fortunes swinging back and forth, from color to “bankruptcy”. They were involved in real estate, but 2008 came along. She describes her family in the book as loving, equestrian, but unconventional, demanding the use of some toilet paper but missing utility bills. Her mother, Cynthia Maloney, who hadn’t read the book yet, told me, “I don’t think Emily fully understands everything that happened at the time, but that didn’t bother me. more importance. Because it’s her story – don’t you think she’s great? I mean, she’s a brilliant writer. She describes her daughter regularly leaving school to take the train to Chicago and visit art museums. She says her Emily rarely fits easy molds.

A chapter in her book is a sort of taxonomy of all the therapists she’s seen since she was little. Another chapter – “A Brief Inventory of My Medicines and Their Retail Prices” – is an account of the more than two dozen prescriptions she received. “At the end of the day,” she told me, “I don’t know if any of them were really a good idea.”

As she describes her work in healthcare companies, as she explains her own healthcare, you paint a disturbing picture, one that is professional, threadbare and arbitrary. She told me about a disaster drill at a job, where fake patients were treated alongside real patients, to illustrate staff flexibility. Which quickly became a sobering illustration of their meager resources. It was a decade before the pandemic.

Again, not shocking, just the cost of living.

Prior to the suicide attempt, she had been misdiagnosed with bipolar disorder. Several years after her attempt, she was diagnosed, she says, with a “non-verbal learning disability.” I learned to behave, but only later in life. I speak fast and I think slowly. It made sense to her. She was also diagnosed with thyroid problems and vitamin deficiency. She knows how mind-blowing that sounds. In fact, when she thinks back to her suicide attempt — she swallowed a bottle of lithium — she realizes that if she had been taken to another hospital, declared destitute, placed in county care, she would not have had of debts.

Indeed, 10 years after she started paying her medical bills — at $25 a month — she called the collection agency to tell them her bank had been acquired and she had new routing numbers. It was kind of a routine, routine call. She had new checks printed. The woman who took the call looked at her account and informed her: In fact, this debt is now beyond the statute of limitations. If Maloney stopped paying now, no one would look for the remaining balance and nothing would be reported to a credit agency.

“Have a nice weekend,” the woman said and hung up.

Maloney sat in silence.

No, no, that’s not right, she thought. Someone would call back in a minute to say a mistake had been made. But no one ever called. These days she is working on her next book. “The funny thing is, if my bank had never been bought, if I didn’t have new routing numbers, I would still be paying off that suicide attempt, long into the foreseeable future, forever. “

©2022 Chicago Tribune. Visit chicagotribune.com. Distributed by Content Agency Tribune, LLC.

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“Thursday Night Lights” with author Michael Hurd https://fcacleveland.org/thursday-night-lights-with-author-michael-hurd/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 22:09:10 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/thursday-night-lights-with-author-michael-hurd/ Through hello woods | February 8, 2022 Join Village Books for an evening with author Michael Hurd on Wednesday, February 16 at 7 p.m. Join this free Facebook event here or call 281-771-8462! Michael Hurd’s “Thursday Night Lights” chronicles how African-American high school football programs produced championship teams and outstanding players in the Jim Crow […]]]>

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Join Village Books for an evening with author Michael Hurd on Wednesday, February 16 at 7 p.m. Join this free Facebook event here or call 281-771-8462!

Michael Hurd’s “Thursday Night Lights” chronicles how African-American high school football programs produced championship teams and outstanding players in the Jim Crow era. Author Michael Hurd is a resident of The Woodlands and is a writer, historian, and former director of the Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture at Prairie View A&M University. He is a Houston native, a graduate of Evan E. Worthing High School, a Vietnamese Air Force veteran, and a journalism major from the University of Texas at Austin. He is a former sports journalist for The Houston Postthe Austin American Statesmanand USA today. He is a fellow of the Texas Institute of Letters and a trustee of the Friends of the Texas Historical Commission. The event is free but registration is required and masks are required if not fully vaccinated.

Village Books is an independent, community-focused bookstore selling new books and gifts located at 9955 Woodlands Parkway in The Woodlands, TX. Learn more by visiting their website at myvillagebooks.com.

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Author and patron Chris Vick inspires Rossendale students https://fcacleveland.org/author-and-patron-chris-vick-inspires-rossendale-students/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 15:53:24 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/author-and-patron-chris-vick-inspires-rossendale-students/ An author whose novel inspired high school students during confinement is now his Patron of Reading. Yasmine Choudhry, librarian at Haslingden High School, Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire sent out a tweet asking for an author to fill the new role – and tagged her three favorite authors in the post. She was thrilled when Chris Vick […]]]>

An author whose novel inspired high school students during confinement is now his Patron of Reading.

Yasmine Choudhry, librarian at Haslingden High School, Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire sent out a tweet asking for an author to fill the new role – and tagged her three favorite authors in the post.

She was thrilled when Chris Vick responded because when they used Zoom for lessons, students responded well to an excerpt from his Girl book. Boy. Wed.

Chris was now able to make his first visit, in real time, to the school. He spoke to different age groups and led workshops to inspire and excite students in writing and reading.

He encouraged students to think about how a story is written, what might be the inspiration and how to add color and “discover their voice”.

In response to students’ questions, he explained that he had written 10 to 11 books – some incomplete – and had published five including Girl. Boy. Mer. who was shortlisted for the Carnegie Prize.

Chris said reading a good book inspired him to write and when he started writing it was like disappearing into the world of a good book but multiplied by 10.

Year 7 student Claudia Lord, 12, said: ‘It was really nice to see a real author. A few years ago I tried to write a book, but got sidetracked. I like English and my teacher is really nice. He made me want to write. »

Chris said: “I’m a writer but also an educator, and when I get real buzz, it’s seeing people go from ‘I can’t write’ to ‘Can I write?’ ” so I can’.

“Being able to work in a school in person and not just in an online workshop was great. The young people were engaged, interesting and interested.

Ms Choudhry is also planning a literary festival at the school in June.

She said: “Writers come in all shapes and sizes and writing can be a great form of therapy. It’s great that something so positive has come out of Covid and it’s been so good to get back to normality and be able to invite Chris into school and engage the students in creativity.

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Letter: West Hartford Parent Community Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Groups Strongly Support Mascot Name Change – We-Ha https://fcacleveland.org/letter-west-hartford-parent-community-equity-diversity-inclusion-groups-strongly-support-mascot-name-change-we-ha/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 18:23:18 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/letter-west-hartford-parent-community-equity-diversity-inclusion-groups-strongly-support-mascot-name-change-we-ha/ We-Ha.com welcomes letters to the editor from the public, including endorsements, but letters submitted by political candidates 60 days before an election will not be published. Please include your name and city, as well as your phone number at the end of the letter. Phone numbers will not be published but are required in case […]]]>

We-Ha.com welcomes letters to the editor from the public, including endorsements, but letters submitted by political candidates 60 days before an election will not be published. Please include your name and city, as well as your phone number at the end of the letter. Phone numbers will not be published but are required in case of verification. Please send letters to Editorial@we-ha.com.

Editor’s note: This letter to the West Hartford Board of Education was submitted to We-Ha.com as a press release

Dear West Hartford School Board Members,

As residents of West Hartford and parents/guardians of many West Hartford public school children, we are writing to you today asking that you remove the current Hall and Conard High School team names. Over the past few years, many members of our community have been actively engaged in amplifying the voices of Native Americans in Connecticut and nationally. While the BOE removed the mascot image in 2015, it’s time to remove the Chieftain and Warrior team names and replace them with new names not associated with Indigenous peoples.

This is especially critical now given the district’s implementation of the Social-Emotional Learning Program and the recent adoption of its Education Equity Policy. In addition, the District’s funding risk and the District’s reputation and role as a leader in the state must be strongly considered.

Several groups, including local Native and Nation tribal members, have already publicly called on Connecticut high schools to stop using Native images and names. As you may recall, in 2015 the Clan Mother of the Golden Hill Tribe Paugussett of Trumbull contacted the BOE to remove native mascots from West Hartford. More recent examples can be found in Glastonbury, Manchester, Guilford, Farmington, North Haven and other local communities, all of which have indigenous tribal members and nations calling for the removal of these images and names. Additionally, the National Congress of American Indians argues that “rather than honoring Indigenous peoples, these caricatures and stereotypes are harmful, perpetuate negative stereotypes of the original peoples of America, and contribute to the disregard for the personality of Indigenous peoples. “. CHRO, the national human rights agency, has called for an end to indigenous mascot images and names following the state legislature’s decision to stop allocating tribal money to municipalities that use indigenous images or names as mascots.

Most Americans are still unaware of Native histories and cultures, viewing Native people as extinct and fixed, which amounts, as Native Echo Hawk describes it, to “a modern form of anti-Native racism.” Replacing the Chief and Warrior names is just one step toward honoring Native Americans in our community.

You’ll hear about the ‘pride’, ‘school spirit’ and ‘history’ that some associate with these team names. It ignores and whitewashes the pride, spirit and infinitely longer history of the indigenous people who lived here. These are peoples whose lands have been usurped by settlers and whose tribal members have been mistreated throughout history. While we can’t entirely right these wrongs, we can remove these disrespectful and problematic names. We can teach our children to respect cultures. We can teach them that just because something has been a certain way for a while doesn’t mean it’s right, and that we can change things for the better.

We urge you to make the right decision now. It is incumbent upon you as leaders to remove these problematic and disrespectful team names once and for all.

Thank you for your time.

Truly,

West Hartford Parent Community Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Groups

West Hartford occupies the homelands of the Siacogs, Poquonocks and Tunxis, as well as other indigenous peoples, who have ruled these lands through generations. Connecticut also occupies the homelands of the Mohegan, Mashantucket Pequot, Eastern Pequot, Schaghticoke, Golden Hill Paugussett, Nipmuc, and Lenape peoples.

With thanks to Judy Wyman of the Connecticut Human Rights Partnership Steering Committee for resources and references.

The goal of the West Hartford Parent Community EDI Groups is to create a collaborative space for parents, educators, and community members to come together to listen, learn, and act on equity initiatives for a systemic change that will ensure all children have the opportunity to succeed in school. In 2017, the first parent-led Equity, Diversity and Inclusion school group was created. Since then, other EDI groups have been created in nearly every public school in West Hartford.

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What students say about rejection, overcoming fear and their ‘word of the year’ https://fcacleveland.org/what-students-say-about-rejection-overcoming-fear-and-their-word-of-the-year/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 17:55:06 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/what-students-say-about-rejection-overcoming-fear-and-their-word-of-the-year/ My fears kept me from doing many things I wanted to do. I missed social events, school, etc. I have very bad social anxiety and I’m very afraid of people judging me. This made it very difficult for me to ask for help because I feel stupid when I do, and because of this I […]]]>

My fears kept me from doing many things I wanted to do. I missed social events, school, etc. I have very bad social anxiety and I’m very afraid of people judging me. This made it very difficult for me to ask for help because I feel stupid when I do, and because of this I had many missed assignments just because I was too nervous to ask for help. ‘aid. After reading this article I realized that a lot of people feel the same way and don’t let your fears take over because in the long run you will look back and regret the opportunities you missed.

McKenzie, Loveland, Colorado

Fear keeps people from living. It traps us and convinces us that we are not up to the task, that we are too weak to fight. But Ms. Gorman’s advice reminds us that the only possible way to truly overcome our fears is to own them and face them head-on. While it really is a struggle to muster the courage to own our fear, in the end, if we go all the way, the reward and the sense of accomplishment are worth it. Ms. Gorman’s advice reflects this idea, so in an effort to overcome my fear of public speaking, I will own her.

Pug, Glenbard West High School, Glen Ellyn

I struggle with ADHD and anxiety, both of these diagnoses sometimes try to scare me from doing even the smallest of things. The anxious voice in my head is trying to talk me out of going somewhere or doing something with the “What if?” questions: “What if you fail? » What if you get injured? “What if it doesn’t go as planned? Something that I learned, so I don’t pass things on that I would probably regret, is to silence those voices because if I didn’t, I would be like the speaker, Amanda Gorman, who has almost stopped delivering his poem during Biden’s inauguration because of the “what if.” She realized that if she missed this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity because she was afraid of the possible outcomes, she might regret it forever.

Olivia, Block 4, Hoggard High School

Whenever my paranoid thoughts invade my mind, I mentally tell myself out loud, “Stop talking. Everything will be fine,” repeatedly. It works well when there’s something I can distract myself with (like a crowd), but when there are times when I’m alone, it doesn’t work as well. I do my best to think positively and look at the bright sides. “My parents will be proud of me. I will be proud of myself. It will be good for me.

Yang, JR Masterman Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Giving a presentation in front of the class or preparing for a presentation makes me anxious; therefore, I use several techniques that help me stay relaxed so that those nervous feelings don’t get in the way of my presentation. Like Mrs. Gorman, I recite words of confidence and encouragement. It is an effective strategy because it allows me to realize that I am ready for what awaits me. Also, I remember that the presentation will last for a short period of time. When finished, the pressure will no longer be a burden. Another effective tool I use when talking to large groups of people is to focus on a point in the crowd. This prevents me from reading files directly and forces me to face the public I am addressing. These approaches helped relieve my anxiety and allowed me to present more comfortably in front of my classes.

Javier, Maury High School, Norfolk VA

I was around 12 years old. I remember driving to the Disney parks and seeing the biggest roller coaster of my life, and saying I would never ride it. Well, I was wrong. My mother had different plans for me. As the ride approached I was waiting for my family to do their thing, I even went so far as to wait near a churro stand as they were in line. But then my mom called me to at least stand in line with them, so I was ready to go, and she asked me to go at least to the front of the line, then to wait at least on the side as they went on the ride, then by magical persuasion, I sat in the seat of my first roller coaster. I admit it was fun and I’ve never stapled my feet so hard to anything, but it was nice to let go of my fears and experience something I never would have predicted, without dying.

Beautiful, Atrisco Heritage Academy

If I am confronted with anxious thoughts and doubts at a certain moment, I say to myself, “What am I doing? and “Does it really matter?” If the answer is yes, then I try not to think about it because it would just lead to a buildup of stress or I try to relax before making a decision. I personally believe that a decision made with emotions is a very hasty and illogical decision. After all that’s done, I regroup and start thinking of a solution and if I think it won’t work, I’ll think some more. So I ask myself, “What could be worse? Then I go ahead with the decision. If I am overwhelmed with fear and severe anxious thoughts, then I take an obviously different approach. Even though it seems far-fetched, I tend to have an easier time dealing with fear when I just tell myself it’s just my head.

David, Glenbard West High School

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Before dying, the writer Roberto Calasso had the Old Testament in mind https://fcacleveland.org/before-dying-the-writer-roberto-calasso-had-the-old-testament-in-mind/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 10:00:03 +0000 https://fcacleveland.org/before-dying-the-writer-roberto-calasso-had-the-old-testament-in-mind/ But the main interest of “The Book of All Books” lies not in its fictional embellishments but in the stories themselves. Most of us have lost the practice of daily Bible reading that characterized previous generations, just as we have lost the deep dive into ancient Greece that was once an integral part of high […]]]>

But the main interest of “The Book of All Books” lies not in its fictional embellishments but in the stories themselves. Most of us have lost the practice of daily Bible reading that characterized previous generations, just as we have lost the deep dive into ancient Greece that was once an integral part of high school education. I consider myself reasonably familiar with the Bible, yet I found myself checking again and again to be sure Calasso wasn’t making it all up: Get up, bald! Get on it, baldhead! Elisha looked up, glared at them, and cursed them. Then ‘two bears came out of the forest and tore 42 of the boys to pieces’. is all there in II Kings 2:23-24.

In addition to remarking that “not everyone considered him a benefactor”, Calasso tells without comment this little story about the prophet Elisha. It seems, along with other anecdotes, to convey both the power and the strangeness of the Hebrew prophets. “These men,” he remarks, “shared a certain wickedness, spoke with great vehemence and deployed on principle only two registers: condemnation and consolation, vast deserts of condemnation, that is to say relieved by rare oases of inconceivable sweetness”. Their character traits culminate in the strangest of all prophets, Ezekiel, and it is with Ezekiel’s supremely bizarre visions that Calasso’s book comes to a close.

Ezekiel brings into sharp relief the key principles which Calasso believes weave together all the diverse stories he tells and which define the destiny and identity of the Jews. (Notably, it is as Jews—and not as Hebrews or Israelites in their historical and geographic particularity—that he identifies the characters in his book.) The first of these principles is separation. Yahweh insists that his people be different, and zealously maintain that difference, from all surrounding peoples, just as he insists that he, Yahweh, be their only god. All manifestations of the desire to be like the others—for example, to have kings, as the surrounding peoples do—arouse his blinding anger.

In a one-chapter digression, Calasso accounts for Freud’s late essay “Moses and Monotheism” as a tormented attempt to undo this foundational separation, Freud argued that Moses was himself a foreigner, an Egyptian marked in the ancient custom of Egypt by circumcision. . What had appeared to be the Abrahamic sign defining tribal distinction for all males was actually a sign of assimilation. “Assimilation has come before separation”, as Calasso summarizes Freud’s argument, “and this separation had been introduced by an Egyptian, therefore the Jew had no real self-nature”. But try telling that to Ezekiel.

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